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By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
BOWIE -- As a free-agent outfielder playing in Venezuela last winter, Adam Loewen hoped to show enough to earn a chance in spring training. And then he realized that his best shot to get back to the major leagues might be what originally got him there: his prized left arm. Now with the Reading Fightin Phils, the Philadelphia Phillies' Double-A affiliate, Loewen came with his team to Double-A Bowie this week. "It's like I'm starting over every five years at something different," Loewen said Tuesday.
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By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
BOWIE -- As a free-agent outfielder playing in Venezuela last winter, Adam Loewen hoped to show enough to earn a chance in spring training. And then he realized that his best shot to get back to the major leagues might be what originally got him there: his prized left arm. Now with the Reading Fightin Phils, the Philadelphia Phillies' Double-A affiliate, Loewen came with his team to Double-A Bowie this week. "It's like I'm starting over every five years at something different," Loewen said Tuesday.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | March 18, 2007
The Orioles picked Adam Loewen with the fourth overall selection in the 2002 draft. After starting the 2006 season at Double-A Bowie, the 22-year-old left-hander went 6-6 with a 5.37 ERA for the Orioles. He is a native of Surrey, British Columbia. How much have things changed for you since last spring? -- It's been a lot more comfortable for me. There are a lot of new faces, but I feel like everyone knows that we have a chance this year. So, it's a lot more fun. What is it like working with pitching coach Leo Mazzone?
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The Orioles have lost so often and in so many ways in recent years at Rogers Centre that squandering myriad offensive opportunities and blowing a late lead like they did to the Toronto Blue Jays in Sunday's 6-5 defeat seem rather pedestrian. These Orioles, though, are seemingly a creative bunch, and they added a new wrinkle Sunday afternoon: Allowing their former top pitching prospect to hit the first homer of his big league career in a game-changing moment. With the Orioles clinging to a one-run lead in the seventh, starter Tommy Hunter served up a 400-foot-plus shot to Adam Loewen, the Orioles' first-rounder in 2002 who is making his comeback as an outfielder after elbow injuries derailed his mound career.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | April 17, 2008
Barely five minutes into the first inning last night Chicago White Sox slugger Jim Thome launched a towering three-run homer to center field and signaled that this was not going to be the night Adam Loewen chased away the concern that has been growing up around him for the past two months. Loewen worked to a full count against leadoff man Nick Swisher and gave up a sharp single to right. He walked Orlando Cabrera on four pitches. And Thome did what Thome does to inexperienced pitchers with shaky command.
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By ROCK KUBATKO | May 1, 2008
Orioles pitcher Adam Loewen had a magnetic resonance imaging on his left elbow after leaving his most recent start in the third inning because of persistent soreness. He also had a CT scan. And while the Orioles prepared to take batting practice Tuesday, Loewen underwent a bone scan on the same arm that came back clear. Are there any more tests out there? Just wait until tomorrow, when the Orioles purchase a home pregnancy kit. If the stick turns blue, Loewen won't return to the rotation for nine months.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun reporter | February 22, 2008
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- He threw his 25th pitch and then quickly campaigned minor league pitching instructor Dave Schmidt for permission to throw a couple of more. His request was denied, so left-hander Adam Loewen walked slowly off the mound before settling into the first row of bleachers. After having this feeling wrested away from him for nearly 10 months, Loewen wanted to cherish the moment. He faced hitters at the Orioles' workout yesterday, another important step in his recovery from surgery to repair a stress fracture in his left elbow.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | April 26, 2008
The Orioles placed prized left-hander Adam Loewen on the 15-day disabled list yesterday, and I'm guessing everybody is thinking pretty much the same thing I am right now: "I knew there had to be something physically wrong with him." We all suspected it, and there was plenty of evidence, but the kid is a gamer and he told us he was OK and we believed him instead of our eyes. There wasn't much else to do. His velocity was OK, so it was easy enough to chalk up his control problems to the normal post-injury process during which the injured appendage gets gradually stronger and the injured pitcher gradually regains confidence in his ability to do the same things he did before he got hurt.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2007
Not long after receiving the best news of his young professional career, Adam Loewen sat alone on a bus. Leaving his Bowie Baysox uniform behind, the 22-year-old pitcher boarded a bus in Altoona, Pa., to catch a flight in Pittsburgh the next morning. He was headed to Seattle, where he would make his major league debut for the Orioles the next night against the Mariners. The two-hour ride would give Loewen time to notify family and friends that he had finally gotten the call. But the driver got lost trying to navigate through the Pennsylvania night, leaving Loewen four hours to wrestle with his emotions.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2007
NEW YORK -- He had never felt this way. Not as a kid representing Canada in the pressure-filled Little League World Series. Not in his first professional start. Not even when he faced the powerful U.S. team in the World Baseball Classic. Adam Loewen's hands shook, making it impossible to grip the baseball. That explained the errant fastball that hit Adrian Beltre in the helmet. His legs felt numb, his 6-foot-5, 235-pound frame wobbly. Orioles @Yankees Tonight, 7:05, Ch. 13, MASN, 105.7 FM Starters: Adam Loewen (6-6, 5.37 in 2006)
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By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Adam Loewen said he's not as emotional this weekend as he was Wednesday, when he made his debut as an outfielder for the Toronto Blue Jays — more than three years after he pitched his final game for the Orioles. But he's not acting like facing his old club is routine. "I came up with the Orioles. I still watch a lot of their games because I am pretty much a fan of the Orioles. I was drafted by them, I know all the guys. I know the awesome people in the organization that are running it now," Loewen, the fourth overall pick in the 2002 draft who never realized his pitching potential because of injuries, said Friday.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
This was Zach Britton's organization before it was Brian Matusz's or Chris Tillman's or Jake Arrieta's. The Orioles' "Big Three" didn't join the franchise until after Britton was picked in the third round (85th overall) of the 2006 amateur draft out of Weatherford (Texas) High. In the club's past nine drafts, the only high school pitchers the Orioles have selected higher than Britton were this year's top pick Matt Hobgood (fifth overall) and Adam Loewen (fourth overall) in 2002. Now that Britton, a 21-year-old left-hander, is establishing himself as one of the organization's best, the man who signed him for $435,000 isn't surprised.
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By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | November 18, 2008
The Orioles have taken the first step in their pursuit of Maryland-born first baseman Mark Teixeira. "We have had discussions with his representative," club president Andy MacPhail said yesterday. The Orioles contacted Teixeira's agent, Scott Boras, on Friday, the first day clubs were allowed to officially court free agents, MacPhail said. There were no offers; Boras indicated he would get back to the Orioles when he wanted to talk specifics. It was simply an initial conversation between two deliberate, thorough men in a process that will take weeks, maybe months before resolution.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | October 25, 2008
The news that Adam Loewen has signed with the Blue Jays is a little bit of a shock - and it probably could be interpreted by the Orioles' front office as a slap in the face - but it's not exactly a setback for the organization. In fact, you can make the case that Loewen did the O's a favor by jumping ship, since the odds of his actually becoming a serviceable position player at the major league level remain quite long. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
If Adam Loewen is going to make a successful transition into a power-hitting outfielder or first baseman, it won't be in an Orioles uniform. In a surprising development, Loewen confirmed yesterday that he has signed a minor league contract with the Toronto Blue Jays, turning down an offer from the Orioles, who were confident they would be able to retain their 2002 first-round draft pick. "It was a lot tougher decision than when I decided to hang up pitching for my career," Loewen said.
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By DAN CONNOLLY | October 1, 2008
On Monday, we looked at whether the Orioles are better off now than they were in April. I'd say they are, but barely. There are more bright spots, but the starting pitching is so much worse than expected. Based on 2008 performances, only Jeremy Guthrie can be counted on for 2009. And it's possible Adam Loewen and Daniel Cabrera will never pitch for the Orioles again. Ouch. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
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By KATIE CARRERA and KATIE CARRERA,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
In the winter meetings leading up to the 2006 season, one of the Orioles' top priorities was finding a closer. "It seemed like all we wanted to do," manager Sam Perlozzo recalled. Orioles@Red Sox Tonight, 7:05, Comcast SportsNet, 1090 AM Starters: O's Adam Loewen (2-3, 5.72) vs. Red Sox's David Wells (0-2, 8.05)
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By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
You've got to appreciate living in a country with a government as benevolent as it is merciful. Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and AIG all had checkbooks with more red scribbled in them than your kid's first spelling test. But in swooped the government with a charitable bailout. Well, why should such generosity be limited to failing private companies? Here in the sports world, there are plenty of organizations, teams and athletes in need - believe me - and plenty could benefit from a similar government bailout.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | September 9, 2008
Adam Loewen took the next step in his daunting transition from pitcher to hitter yesterday, spending an hour in the Camden Yards inside cage with hitting coach Terry Crowley. "It's weird, but I think the challenging part is going to be when I face live pitching and that's going to be a strain for me," said Loewen, who hasn't hit regularly since playing junior college ball in 2002. "But I'm not expecting anything significant. From the start, I know I'm not going to be that great. Crow just told me to work on the same swing and eventually, I'll develop my own swing and my own style."
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