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By Art Buchwald | August 5, 1993
MOST writers have to be grateful to Joe McGinniss, author of "The Last Brother," the story of Edward Kennedy. Mr. McGinniss has declared that it is perfectly OK to lift other historians' work without due credit.He has also written that it is perfectly all right when writing nonfiction to put words in somebody else's mouth. In his bTC Kennedy biography, without footnotes or an index, Mr. McGinniss has declared it is up to the author to make the person come to life by inventing things that did not necessarily happen.
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October 11, 2012
Regarding Todd Reitzel's recent letter (Sept. 27), one must realize that the interpretation of Holy Scripture is not based on politically correct consensus. Neither is it open to personal interpretation (cf. 2 Peter 1:20). The establishment of marriage is seen from the first couple, Adam and Eve, a man and a woman. Genesis 2:24 is clear and should be pondered. God did not create other sets of couples alongside Adam and Eve. We come from God and the reality is he loves everyone: both those with opposite sex attraction and same sex attraction.
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NEWS
By Don Spatz | August 24, 1994
Nuptials No marriage is perfect -- That's right as rain You will remember, folks: Adam and Eve raised Cain. Don Spatz writes from Baltimore.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
According to the book of Genesis, the core of the devil's temptation of Adam and Eve was the suggestion that they would become like gods, knowing good and evil. Last Friday's decision by the Maryland House of Delegates is only one of several recent attempts by legislatures, courts and government executives to act like gods, redefining good and evil. How much longer will it be before they start acting like Roman emperors, demanding that we worship them as gods? Charles Roswell, Columbia
NEWS
February 24, 2012
According to the book of Genesis, the core of the devil's temptation of Adam and Eve was the suggestion that they would become like gods, knowing good and evil. Last Friday's decision by the Maryland House of Delegates is only one of several recent attempts by legislatures, courts and government executives to act like gods, redefining good and evil. How much longer will it be before they start acting like Roman emperors, demanding that we worship them as gods? Charles Roswell, Columbia
NEWS
February 20, 2012
The Sun has a lot of gall to emphatically state in its editorial that "legalization of same sex marriage is inevitable " or that "it's the direction in which the country is moving" ("Marriage, equality and Maryland," Feb. 16). The last time I checked there were 50 states in this country and those that prohibit same-sex marriage are far more numerous than paltry handful of states that allow it. Benefits such as health care decisions, inheritance taxes, etc. can be addressed without allowing people of the same sex to marry.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2012
Regarding Todd Reitzel's recent letter (Sept. 27), one must realize that the interpretation of Holy Scripture is not based on politically correct consensus. Neither is it open to personal interpretation (cf. 2 Peter 1:20). The establishment of marriage is seen from the first couple, Adam and Eve, a man and a woman. Genesis 2:24 is clear and should be pondered. God did not create other sets of couples alongside Adam and Eve. We come from God and the reality is he loves everyone: both those with opposite sex attraction and same sex attraction.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | June 12, 1994
Sculptors, Incorporated sculpts out exhibitions celebrating 0) its membersSculptors, Incorporated is a 10-year-old nonprofit organization sculptors and sculpture enthusiasts devoted to promoting sculpture through exhibitions and other public programming. Currently, members of the group are involved in two local exhibitions. At the City Hall Courtyard Galleries is "Decade," a show in celebration of the organization's 10th anniversary and including one work each by 39 members, selected by a Sculptors, Inc. panel.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | November 13, 1991
The great American humorist's spirit and style take center stage this weekend, as the North Carroll High School Thespians perform "An Evening With Mark Twain."Nearly two dozen students will perform in teacher Roberta Rooney's adaptation of material drawn from Twain's classic novel "Huckleberry Finn" as well as "The Apple Tree," "The Diaryof Adam and Eve," "Noah and the Bureaucrat" and other stories."This is different from anything we have ever done, since we usually do two-act plays," said Rooney, who has taught drama at the school for 10 years.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | August 1, 1991
One of the pleasures of looking at illuminated manuscripts is to turn your attention to the margins. Although the text and its accompanying illustrations are the main attraction, the decorative flourishes in the margins are often even more delightful.The current manuscript show at the Walters Art Gallery, which deals with the role played by plants and flowers in illuminated manuscripts, is like a compact garden in which even the margins have been intensively cultivated.Sometimes these floral decorations are merely pleasing visual accents, but as often they have symbolic significance.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
The Sun has a lot of gall to emphatically state in its editorial that "legalization of same sex marriage is inevitable " or that "it's the direction in which the country is moving" ("Marriage, equality and Maryland," Feb. 16). The last time I checked there were 50 states in this country and those that prohibit same-sex marriage are far more numerous than paltry handful of states that allow it. Benefits such as health care decisions, inheritance taxes, etc. can be addressed without allowing people of the same sex to marry.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
SOMETHING'S in the air, and it's got people taking their clothes off. A National Public Radio reporter confesses that she did her broadcasts from Baghdad in the altogether. Two Southwest Airlines pilots are fired for flying a plane in their birthday suits. A photographer fills a shopping mall escalator in the Midwest with naked people. The annual report of the Progressive insurance company features nude photos - of an 82-year-old man. In Dayton, Ohio, a younger man spends two days stuck in the air-conditioning duct of a clothing store, wearing only his socks.
NEWS
By David T. Z. Mindich | July 25, 2000
BURLINGTON, Vt. -- This morning, I found my wife of 10 years packing her valise. "What are you doing," I asked. "I'm leaving you, David," she told me. "Is it because Vermont's civil union law, guaranteeing full benefits for committed same-sex partners, makes our traditional marriage completely meaningless?" I asked. "Precisely," she said. Vermont's civil union law took effect July 1, and within days there is plenty of evidence that the bill's more strident opponents were correct in their dire predictions.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2000
The real star of Saturday night's Haydn "Creation," performed by the Annapolis Chorale, wasn't conductor Ernest Green, his choir, or even his gorgeously adept solo soprano and bass. No, the true hero of the evening was Franz Joseph Haydn. And that's as it should be, for what a majestic, affirming, surpassingly tuneful account of the Book of Genesis he left us. Nearly all of what transpired under Green's baton proved admirable at the service of Haydn's greatest oratorio. His singers were nicely prepared, so that magnificent choruses such as "Awake the Harp," "Fulfilled at Last the Glorious Work" and the concluding "The Lord Is Great" rang out with authority and verve.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
The last concert composer Franz Joseph Haydn attended before his death took place in Vienna on March 27, 1808. The program consisted of a single work, Haydn's own oratorio, "The Creation," an extraordinary musical account he'd composed more than a decade earlier of the Book of Genesis. When conductor Antonio Salieri's chorus blazed in with that thumping C major chord at "And there was light" near the beginning of the piece, the enthusiastic audience immediately burst into applause. Haydn, a feeble 76-year-old with only a few months to live, pointed heavenward and said, "Not from me -- from there above comes everything."
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 1998
MENTION MARK Twain, and people instantly visualize a mustached man in white, making witty remarks and clever observations about people and life situations.We all know him for the characters of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, but he also wrote many not-so-famous stories that reflect values important in our modern lives.Such a story is the "Diary of Adam and Eve." At 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Sunday and Sept. 18-20 at Firehouse Pub and Grill, Mount Airy Players will present an original adaptation of this comedy, which gives us a tongue-in-cheek look at what life might have been like for the First Man and Woman.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2000
The real star of Saturday night's Haydn "Creation," performed by the Annapolis Chorale, wasn't conductor Ernest Green, his choir, or even his gorgeously adept solo soprano and bass. No, the true hero of the evening was Franz Joseph Haydn. And that's as it should be, for what a majestic, affirming, surpassingly tuneful account of the Book of Genesis he left us. Nearly all of what transpired under Green's baton proved admirable at the service of Haydn's greatest oratorio. His singers were nicely prepared, so that magnificent choruses such as "Awake the Harp," "Fulfilled at Last the Glorious Work" and the concluding "The Lord Is Great" rang out with authority and verve.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
The last concert composer Franz Joseph Haydn attended before his death took place in Vienna on March 27, 1808. The program consisted of a single work, Haydn's own oratorio, "The Creation," an extraordinary musical account he'd composed more than a decade earlier of the Book of Genesis. When conductor Antonio Salieri's chorus blazed in with that thumping C major chord at "And there was light" near the beginning of the piece, the enthusiastic audience immediately burst into applause. Haydn, a feeble 76-year-old with only a few months to live, pointed heavenward and said, "Not from me -- from there above comes everything."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Midway between the White House and the Washington Monument, a line of tubby sculptures newly plumped down along Constitution Avenue seems as happily inflated as the cartoon balloons in Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade -- every bit as charming, just as much fun, but a whole lot more ironic, puncturing people puffed up with inert gases and hot air.Strolling among them at the entrance to the Ellipse, Jean Talbert, 39, looks up. Twelve feet of bloated bronze manhood...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 13, 1994
Think of Raoul Middleman and inevitably you think of landscape paintings, then of portraits. He's not as known for his narrative paintings. But the five narrative paintings on view at Maryland Art Place will change that. They are a revelation -- not only different, but also his best work.They are monumental in scale (up to 10-by-16-feet) and baroque in concept: dynamic and dramatic, with intensity of color and emotion. The paintings, crowded with figures, are characterized by Middleman's active brush stroke, so that at first 5l glance they may look casually executed.
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