Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAd Nauseam
IN THE NEWS

Ad Nauseam

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 17, 2014
We've heard about Ray Rice, the NFL and the Ravens ad nauseam. Enough already! Yvonne Wenger and Aaron Wilson's article about Ray and his wife going to a high school football game is still front page news in the Sports section ( "Ray Rice, wife make first public appearance since release of elevator video," Sept. 13), but is there anything that could be less important? Marvin Oed, Cockeysville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2014
We've heard about Ray Rice, the NFL and the Ravens ad nauseam. Enough already! Yvonne Wenger and Aaron Wilson's article about Ray and his wife going to a high school football game is still front page news in the Sports section ( "Ray Rice, wife make first public appearance since release of elevator video," Sept. 13), but is there anything that could be less important? Marvin Oed, Cockeysville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Hampton Thompson "Red" Davey Jr., a history and social science professor at St. Mary's College of Maryland, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in California, Md. He was 61. Dr. Davey had been on a leave of absence for about a year because of illness. In the early 1990s, Dr. Davey, a popular professor with an encyclopedic memory, helped transform St. Mary's from a "party school" to a college known for its academics, said Marc Apter, spokesman for the college. "Red was critical during the college's rise from a regular college known for being scholarly and fun to one that was notably scholarly," said Jane Margaret O'Brien, president of St. Mary's since 1996.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Now do you get it? When President Barack Obama promised to redistribute the wealth, people didn't think he meant their meager savings. When he promised health care for everyone, they didn't think it would change theirs. When he bowed to foreign kings, people thought he was being polite. When he apologized for America's behavior they got a little uneasy, and when he said America wasn't a Christian nation, people said any religion was accepted here. I could go on ad nauseam, but the most sickening was leaving God out of his rendition of the Gettysburg Address, a sacred American document.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Now do you get it? When President Barack Obama promised to redistribute the wealth, people didn't think he meant their meager savings. When he promised health care for everyone, they didn't think it would change theirs. When he bowed to foreign kings, people thought he was being polite. When he apologized for America's behavior they got a little uneasy, and when he said America wasn't a Christian nation, people said any religion was accepted here. I could go on ad nauseam, but the most sickening was leaving God out of his rendition of the Gettysburg Address, a sacred American document.
NEWS
August 23, 1995
JUST when we need it comes a hopeful word on race relations in the United States. Writing in the New Republic, Jan Breslauer, who covers culture and the arts for the Los Angeles Times, describes how the politics of separatism is disappearing from the L.A. artistic scene. We can hope that development is a harbinger for the rest of the country. Here is an excerpt:"It was probably too much bad performance art that did it -- just about pushed me over the edge. After years of watching multicultural solos and theater pieces ad nauseam . . . I've arrived at a point of exquisite ambivalence.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 15, 2006
Let's get one thing straight right off the top. I don't like Bob Knight one bit, and it wouldn't bother me a whole lot if he announced his retirement from college basketball and entered the senior division of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. The guy is a bully and a dinosaur, which has kept him from being fully recognized as one of the greatest basketball coaches in history; and he is unrepentant, which makes it even easier to focus on all that makes him so dislikable. That's why you could find a Bob Knight historical highlight reel playing regularly on every cable sports channel yesterday, though the incident that showered all this unwanted attention on the Texas Tech basketball program would have passed right under the SportsCenter radar if it had involved any other coach.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | June 1, 2006
That sure was a stirring farewell to Mother Teresa on the Today show yesterday, although it got to be a bit much after a while, didn't it? What's that? You say that wasn't a tribute to Calcutta's beloved "saint of the gutters"? The three hours of mass veneration, the weepy goodbye videos from viewers who said she changed their lives, the gooey testimonials from adoring co-workers, the "We'll Miss You!" signs held aloft by the worshipful crowds shoe-horned into Rockefeller Plaza, the hugs, the kisses, the tears - you say all that was for who?
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | October 22, 2004
SINCLAIR BROADCAST Group's attempt to force an anti-John Kerry propaganda film onto prime time was the latest example of a disturbing trend: ideological programming that blurs the old distinction between news and opinion. Conservative Fox News Network's "Fair and Balanced" slogan, for instance, belies a news operation that many see as anything but. While Bill O'Reilly's show boasts that it is a "no spin zone," it is well within the GOP's comfort zone most of the time. For its part, Sinclair has required its 62 TV stations to run pro-Bush commentary provided by company headquarters.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | January 8, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - As the national media continue to descend upon the Ravens and star middle linebacker Ray Lewis, the story line needs to change from Lewis' having a season of vindication to Lewis' possibly being the best player in the NFL. Though St. Louis Rams running back Marshall Faulk has already received the league's Most Valuable Player award, there is only one player in the class of Lewis, and that's Minnesota Vikings receiver Randy Moss....
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 15, 2006
Let's get one thing straight right off the top. I don't like Bob Knight one bit, and it wouldn't bother me a whole lot if he announced his retirement from college basketball and entered the senior division of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. The guy is a bully and a dinosaur, which has kept him from being fully recognized as one of the greatest basketball coaches in history; and he is unrepentant, which makes it even easier to focus on all that makes him so dislikable. That's why you could find a Bob Knight historical highlight reel playing regularly on every cable sports channel yesterday, though the incident that showered all this unwanted attention on the Texas Tech basketball program would have passed right under the SportsCenter radar if it had involved any other coach.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | June 1, 2006
That sure was a stirring farewell to Mother Teresa on the Today show yesterday, although it got to be a bit much after a while, didn't it? What's that? You say that wasn't a tribute to Calcutta's beloved "saint of the gutters"? The three hours of mass veneration, the weepy goodbye videos from viewers who said she changed their lives, the gooey testimonials from adoring co-workers, the "We'll Miss You!" signs held aloft by the worshipful crowds shoe-horned into Rockefeller Plaza, the hugs, the kisses, the tears - you say all that was for who?
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | October 22, 2004
SINCLAIR BROADCAST Group's attempt to force an anti-John Kerry propaganda film onto prime time was the latest example of a disturbing trend: ideological programming that blurs the old distinction between news and opinion. Conservative Fox News Network's "Fair and Balanced" slogan, for instance, belies a news operation that many see as anything but. While Bill O'Reilly's show boasts that it is a "no spin zone," it is well within the GOP's comfort zone most of the time. For its part, Sinclair has required its 62 TV stations to run pro-Bush commentary provided by company headquarters.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | January 8, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - As the national media continue to descend upon the Ravens and star middle linebacker Ray Lewis, the story line needs to change from Lewis' having a season of vindication to Lewis' possibly being the best player in the NFL. Though St. Louis Rams running back Marshall Faulk has already received the league's Most Valuable Player award, there is only one player in the class of Lewis, and that's Minnesota Vikings receiver Randy Moss....
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Hampton Thompson "Red" Davey Jr., a history and social science professor at St. Mary's College of Maryland, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in California, Md. He was 61. Dr. Davey had been on a leave of absence for about a year because of illness. In the early 1990s, Dr. Davey, a popular professor with an encyclopedic memory, helped transform St. Mary's from a "party school" to a college known for its academics, said Marc Apter, spokesman for the college. "Red was critical during the college's rise from a regular college known for being scholarly and fun to one that was notably scholarly," said Jane Margaret O'Brien, president of St. Mary's since 1996.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
When is a novelty no longer a novelty?Consider the case of the animated Rock Santa Collectible, last holiday season's sleeper, this year's emblem of X-mas excess.Before the seasonal hype began in earnest, the Santa quartet -- a cowboy Holly Jolly Santa, a Coca Cola-toting Santa and two traditional Santas, one black, one white, that groove to "Jingle Bell Rock" or "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" -- seemed the ideal gift item for your cynical brother-in-law. Plug Santa in, his bells jingle and belly jiggles in synergistic schmaltz and irony.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 3, 1992
Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, the Motown song said. There's something in the air, Thunderclap Newman warned. Here, there and everywhere, the Beatles sang.Those lyrics could have been telling us about Olympics-related advertising. Of course, they also could have been telling us about global warming. Or McDonald's franchises. Or stories about Princess Diana. Which reminds me: Don't Prince Charles and Ross Perot have the same kind of ears?But I digress.The Games afford companies the opportunity to plaster the Olympic rings on any product.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
When is a novelty no longer a novelty?Consider the case of the animated Rock Santa Collectible, last holiday season's sleeper, this year's emblem of X-mas excess.Before the seasonal hype began in earnest, the Santa quartet -- a cowboy Holly Jolly Santa, a Coca Cola-toting Santa and two traditional Santas, one black, one white, that groove to "Jingle Bell Rock" or "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" -- seemed the ideal gift item for your cynical brother-in-law. Plug Santa in, his bells jingle and belly jiggles in synergistic schmaltz and irony.
NEWS
August 23, 1995
JUST when we need it comes a hopeful word on race relations in the United States. Writing in the New Republic, Jan Breslauer, who covers culture and the arts for the Los Angeles Times, describes how the politics of separatism is disappearing from the L.A. artistic scene. We can hope that development is a harbinger for the rest of the country. Here is an excerpt:"It was probably too much bad performance art that did it -- just about pushed me over the edge. After years of watching multicultural solos and theater pieces ad nauseam . . . I've arrived at a point of exquisite ambivalence.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 3, 1992
Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, the Motown song said. There's something in the air, Thunderclap Newman warned. Here, there and everywhere, the Beatles sang.Those lyrics could have been telling us about Olympics-related advertising. Of course, they also could have been telling us about global warming. Or McDonald's franchises. Or stories about Princess Diana. Which reminds me: Don't Prince Charles and Ross Perot have the same kind of ears?But I digress.The Games afford companies the opportunity to plaster the Olympic rings on any product.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.