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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
If you've seen people wearing gold ribbons recently, it means they are showing support for National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The medical community, survivors and families are trying to bring attention to the cause and raise money to support children with cancer. Cancer is the leading cause of disease related to death among children, according to Dr. Joseph Wiley, chairman of the department of pediatrics at the Herman & Walter Samuelson Children's Hospital at Sinai Hospital.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 6, 2012
  At the ungodly hour of 5:30 this morning, they step off the Walt Disney World Half Marathon in Orlando: the lean, serious speedsters and the dedicated plodders and the fat guys in Mickey Mouse ears just hoping to make it to the first water stop. Among them will be 28-year-old Georgia Cleland, a small woman from Ruxton with a ready smile. And you can bet she'll be smiling today, because hers might be the best story in the entire field, a three-hankie tale of a family's love and a father's crazy idea that raised millions for cancer research and spawned the whole running-for-a-cause movement.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Sandy Banisky, Dan Fesperman, Peter Jensen, C. Fraser Smith and Scott Wilson contributed to this article | September 19, 1996
In an article in yesterday's editions of The Sun on Spiro Agnew's death, a statement on the many forms of leukemia -- saying that leukemia is "sort of like a last name. It has many first names" -- should have been attributed to Dr. Charles Schiffer, a hematologist and oncologist at the University of Maryland's Greenebaum Cancer Center.The Sun regrets the errors.Former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's death was caused by acute leukemia, a cancer of the blood and blood-making organs that apparently went undiagnosed until the end, his doctors said yesterday.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
If you've seen people wearing gold ribbons recently, it means they are showing support for National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The medical community, survivors and families are trying to bring attention to the cause and raise money to support children with cancer. Cancer is the leading cause of disease related to death among children, according to Dr. Joseph Wiley, chairman of the department of pediatrics at the Herman & Walter Samuelson Children's Hospital at Sinai Hospital.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 6, 2012
  At the ungodly hour of 5:30 this morning, they step off the Walt Disney World Half Marathon in Orlando: the lean, serious speedsters and the dedicated plodders and the fat guys in Mickey Mouse ears just hoping to make it to the first water stop. Among them will be 28-year-old Georgia Cleland, a small woman from Ruxton with a ready smile. And you can bet she'll be smiling today, because hers might be the best story in the entire field, a three-hankie tale of a family's love and a father's crazy idea that raised millions for cancer research and spawned the whole running-for-a-cause movement.
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Howard "Hap" Paul, 44, a veterinarian who helped develop a surgical robot being tested for use in human hip replacement surgery, died Wednesday from complications of acute leukemiain Sacramento, Calif.@
NEWS
October 8, 1991
Dorothea Matthews Dooling, founder and editorial director of Parabola, The Magazine of Myth and Tradition, died on Friday at her ranch in Jackson, Mont. She was 80 and had acute leukemia.
NEWS
September 1, 1997
Stanley Grover, 71, known for his soaring voice on the Broadway stage and his acting in TV shows including "L.A. Law," died Aug. 24 of acute leukemia in Los Angeles.With an unusually powerful bari-tenor voice, he was featured on Broadway in "Candide," "Time Remembered," and "Company" and he toured the nation in productions of many top musicals.Pub Date: 9/01/97
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Morris H. Wolf, an award-winning real estate developer, died Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care from complications from acute leukemia. He was 71. In 1997, Mr. Wolf, principal of Morris H. Wolf Enterprises of Towson, was named Land Developer of the Year by the Home Builders Association of Maryland. His projects include The Club at Patriot's Glen, Vineyard Oak, Country Walk, Woodbridge Center, Harford Town and Laurel Valley in Harford County, and Parkview Trail, Chapelgate and Owings Overlook in Baltimore County.
NEWS
June 29, 2002
Josef F. Thurston, a computer engineer and former Towson resident, died June 22 of acute leukemia at New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York. He was 32 and lived in Washingtonville, N.Y. Born in Stoneham, Mass., he was raised in Framingham. He came to Baltimore about 10 years ago as a Navy courier. While here, he enrolled at Towson University, where he earned a degree in international studies. Mr. Thurston was active in the Baltimore Opera Company and appeared in nonsinging roles in several productions.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Sandy Banisky, Dan Fesperman, Peter Jensen, C. Fraser Smith and Scott Wilson contributed to this article | September 19, 1996
In an article in yesterday's editions of The Sun on Spiro Agnew's death, a statement on the many forms of leukemia -- saying that leukemia is "sort of like a last name. It has many first names" -- should have been attributed to Dr. Charles Schiffer, a hematologist and oncologist at the University of Maryland's Greenebaum Cancer Center.The Sun regrets the errors.Former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's death was caused by acute leukemia, a cancer of the blood and blood-making organs that apparently went undiagnosed until the end, his doctors said yesterday.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
John M. Venditti, a Baltimore native and cancer research scientist who headed the drug evaluation branch of the National Cancer Institute, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at his Bethesda home. He was 79. Raised on Northern Parkway, he attended St. Dominic's parochial school and was a 1945 graduate of Mount St. Joseph's High School. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Maryland, College Park. He received a doctorate in pharmacology from George Washington University's Medical Center for Biomedical Sciences.
NEWS
September 30, 1998
John Odegard, 57, aviation pioneer and founder of the University of North Dakota school that bears his name, died Sunday in Grand Forks, N.D., of kidney cancer. He joined the faculty of the University of North Dakota's business college in 1966 and proposed merging a business degree with a flight program. His proposal gave birth to UND's aviation program.Dr. John Prudden, 78, a surgeon who used medicines made from lobster shells and shark and cow cartilage to heal wounds and treat diseases, died of acute leukemia Sept.
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