Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAcupuncturist
IN THE NEWS

Acupuncturist

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
Karen Lynne Yochim, an acupuncturist who was a founder of the Columbia Center for the Healing Arts, died Tuesday of cancer at her Roland Park home. She was 40. Miss Yochim also had worked as a financial planner for Investment Management and Research Inc. since 1982. She was working part time for the Calverton firm, which is now Potomac Financial Group, at the time of her death. She became interested in acupuncture -- the ancient healing art that was developed in China more than 5,000 years ago and relies on needles to correct the imbalance of "chi," or the life force -- after suffering a spinal injury and being treated with acupuncture in her 20s. "After her first bout with cancer in 1988, she again was treated with acupuncture and eventually decided that she wanted to be an acupuncturist," said her mother, Marie Patricia Yochim of St. Petersburg, Fla. Miss Yochim graduated in 1996 with a master's degree from the Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia, and was a founder in 1997 of the Columbia Center for the Healing Arts, where she tended to patients until last month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 6, 2012
Inspired by an ancient Chinese symbol, which also serves as the logo for her practice, Jade Connelly-Duggan decided to open WisdomWell, a family acupuncture and wellness center in Columbia. “For myself and the people I work with, wellness happens in the gathering place,” she says. “I wanted to create a place where the community can come and gather and share ways of being well.” Connelly-Duggan, a second-generation acupuncturist who has been practicing for four years, founded WisdomWell in November 2011.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Towson acupuncturist Neil Garland pleaded guilty yesterday to practicing without a license and selling mislabeled medicine in a case that stemmed from complaints that he gouged and bruised patients last year.Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Grason Turnbull II handed Garland, 42, a six-month suspended sentence and five years' probation. He also was fined $1,000 and agreed not to practice acupuncture during his probation.Garland appeared in court yesterday, but said nothing in his defense.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
Constant headaches and migraines had Diana Schulin considering acupuncture, but she found herself tensing at the thought of sitting alone in a room while being poked by a dozen needles. She finally took the plunge, and she's glad she did. The needles remain. But at least now she has company. The health care information worker is among a small but growing number of people experiencing the ancient Asian treatment in a group. Some come for the lower cost, while some, like Schulin, are drawn by the camaraderie.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Towson acupuncturist Neil Garland pleaded guilty yesterday to practicing without a license and selling mislabeled medicine in a case that stemmed from complaints that he gouged and bruised patients during unorthodox treatment last year.In the state's first prosecution of an acupuncturist, Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Grason Turnbull II sentenced Garland, 42, to a six-month suspended sentence and five years' probation. He also was fined $1,000 and agreed not to practice acupuncture during his probation.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Melody Simmons and Suzanne Loudermilk contributed to this article | September 19, 1996
A 71-year-old cancer patient's plea for treatment turned into an abusive, 14-hour session at the hands of a Towson acupuncturist, authorities said yesterday, recounting allegations of burning, force-feeding and psychological torment.That treatment led to suspension this summer of Neil Garland's license to practice. Now Garland, 42, is the first acupuncturist in Maryland to be charged with practicing without a license. Yesterday, a judge set bail at $250,000."It is unusual to have bail set at $250,000 for a misdemeanor, but in this case it's warranted," said Assistant Attorney General Sidney Rocke after the bail hearing in a Baltimore County courtroom.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
The Towson acupuncturist accused of abusing a patient and practicing without a license also was the focus of court action last year -- when his parents sought an emergency psychiatric evaluation of him.Baltimore County District Court records show that Milton and Shirley Garland were granted, a court order for the evaluation of Neil Garland in January 1995.In their request, the Garlands said they feared their son and cited a 1992 incident in which he allegedly attacked his mother. The couple wrote that their son had been "calling family and friends with horrible language and spewing hatred towards us. He calls us and says we won't have him as a son anymore and he will get even with us."
NEWS
September 11, 2000
Acupuncturist named to White House panel Sister Charlotte Rose Kerr, a faculty member and acupuncturist at Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia, has been named to the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy. She has served on the Governor's Acupuncture Advisory Council for Maryland, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health Alternative Medicine Program and the board of the Center for Women's Health at Mercy Medical Center. Company founders named co-chairs for arts event Beth and Peter Horowitz, founders of the wireless technology company EVI, will serve as honorary chairs for the Celebration of Arts in Howard County.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
Beyond the iron gate, the fence and the razor wire, 10 inmates in maroon uniforms sit in stillness, listening to the serene sounds of sitar music. Eyes closed, hands folded, they await the tiny pricks of acupuncture needles being inserted delicately in their ears. Ancient Chinese medicine came to Baltimore's jail 16 years ago with the promise of curbing the cravings of drug addiction. Since then, acupuncture has been the centerpiece of a treatment program that serves nearly 700 inmates each year.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 6, 2012
Inspired by an ancient Chinese symbol, which also serves as the logo for her practice, Jade Connelly-Duggan decided to open WisdomWell, a family acupuncture and wellness center in Columbia. “For myself and the people I work with, wellness happens in the gathering place,” she says. “I wanted to create a place where the community can come and gather and share ways of being well.” Connelly-Duggan, a second-generation acupuncturist who has been practicing for four years, founded WisdomWell in November 2011.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 23, 2009
Beyond the iron gate, the fence and the razor wire, 10 inmates in maroon uniforms sit in stillness, listening to the serene sounds of sitar music. Eyes closed, hands folded, they await the tiny pricks of acupuncture needles being inserted delicately in their ears. Ancient Chinese medicine came to Baltimore's jail 16 years ago with the promise of curbing the cravings of drug addiction. Since then, acupuncture has been the centerpiece of a treatment program that serves nearly 700 inmates each year.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBEST and NANCY JONES-BONBEST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2007
Theresa Deramo Acupuncturist Essence of Wellness, Laurel Salary --$35,000 Age --34 Years on the job --Five How she got started --After working as a medical assistant for 11 years, Deramo went back to school and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology. She worked for a nonprofit that assisted chronically mentally ill adults. She then decided to go back for a master's degree and started exploring different options. After being treated for headaches with acupuncture, she fell in love with the practice.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 18, 2005
If you want to tune in to a liberal Democratic college professor, 1090 AM might not be the most obvious spot on the dial. Yet there was Tom Schaller on Fridays, mixing it up with WBAL's conservative listeners and hosts Chip Franklin and Ron Smith. It was fun while it lasted. Now the UMBC political scientist is gone, for reasons that are about as clear as radio reception in the Harbor Tunnel. Schaller says he was fired. WBAL says he's just on leave while he finishes a book and is coming back.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2002
DUKE, A 2-year-old Boston terrier, goes nuts when owner Paula Deister brings out the cleaning supplies. He rips at dusting cloths and can't stand spray bottles. Connie Gribbin of Hickory Ridge describes her 5-year-old collie, Tumble, as high-strung. Tumble barks a lot and pulls against his leash. On Sunday, Deister and Gribbin brought their pets to Columbia Animal Hospital to learn about the Tellington-TTouch method for improving the mental, emotional and physical well-being of animals.
NEWS
September 11, 2000
Acupuncturist named to White House panel Sister Charlotte Rose Kerr, a faculty member and acupuncturist at Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia, has been named to the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy. She has served on the Governor's Acupuncture Advisory Council for Maryland, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health Alternative Medicine Program and the board of the Center for Women's Health at Mercy Medical Center. Company founders named co-chairs for arts event Beth and Peter Horowitz, founders of the wireless technology company EVI, will serve as honorary chairs for the Celebration of Arts in Howard County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
Karen Lynne Yochim, an acupuncturist who was a founder of the Columbia Center for the Healing Arts, died Tuesday of cancer at her Roland Park home. She was 40. Miss Yochim also had worked as a financial planner for Investment Management and Research Inc. since 1982. She was working part time for the Calverton firm, which is now Potomac Financial Group, at the time of her death. She became interested in acupuncture -- the ancient healing art that was developed in China more than 5,000 years ago and relies on needles to correct the imbalance of "chi," or the life force -- after suffering a spinal injury and being treated with acupuncture in her 20s. "After her first bout with cancer in 1988, she again was treated with acupuncture and eventually decided that she wanted to be an acupuncturist," said her mother, Marie Patricia Yochim of St. Petersburg, Fla. Miss Yochim graduated in 1996 with a master's degree from the Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia, and was a founder in 1997 of the Columbia Center for the Healing Arts, where she tended to patients until last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999
Call her the dog whisperer. Betty Kipphut is kneeling beside a black standard poodle named Jake, clutching a handful of shiny, 1-inch-long needles. "Goooood dog," she murmurs as she inserts the needles into his skin, one by one, until he resembles a canine porcupine. Jake's response to this indignity? He licks her.Jake, like Kipphut's other clients (a third are animals; the rest are humans), has come to her Clarksville office for relief. The 8-year-old poodle is suffering from lymphoma as well as side effects of chemotherapy.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 18, 2005
If you want to tune in to a liberal Democratic college professor, 1090 AM might not be the most obvious spot on the dial. Yet there was Tom Schaller on Fridays, mixing it up with WBAL's conservative listeners and hosts Chip Franklin and Ron Smith. It was fun while it lasted. Now the UMBC political scientist is gone, for reasons that are about as clear as radio reception in the Harbor Tunnel. Schaller says he was fired. WBAL says he's just on leave while he finishes a book and is coming back.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999
Call her the dog whisperer. Betty Kipphut is kneeling beside a black standard poodle named Jake, clutching a handful of shiny, 1-inch-long needles. "Goooood dog," she murmurs as she inserts the needles into his skin, one by one, until he resembles a canine porcupine. Jake's response to this indignity? He licks her.Jake, like Kipphut's other clients (a third are animals; the rest are humans), has come to her Clarksville office for relief. The 8-year-old poodle is suffering from lymphoma as well as side effects of chemotherapy.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Towson acupuncturist Neil Garland pleaded guilty yesterday to practicing without a license and selling mislabeled medicine in a case that stemmed from complaints that he gouged and bruised patients last year.Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Grason Turnbull II handed Garland, 42, a six-month suspended sentence and five years' probation. He also was fined $1,000 and agreed not to practice acupuncture during his probation.Garland appeared in court yesterday, but said nothing in his defense.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.