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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Jean E. Hill, a Baltimore model and actress who later performed in three John Waters films, died Wednesday of renal failure at Mercy Medical Center. She was 67. "Jean Hill was my only African-American star. She was a talented comedian, a brave actress and a much valued member of the Dreamland acting gang I worked with in my movies," said Mr. Waters. "She had a personality almost too large for show business, and she startled closed-minded people in every level of society. Sometimes raunchy in her public life, Jean was always classy in her private one, and underneath it all was a real lady," he said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Binnie Ritchie Holum, a dancer, choreographer, playwright and actress who had been a co-founder of the Baltimore Women's Theatre Project , died Sept. 21 at her parents' home near Saranac Lake, N.Y., of a gioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. She was 64. "Her talent was just endless and she had more energy than three people combined," said Harvey M. Doster, her collaborator, who is director of the International Baccalaureate Theater Program at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.
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FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 20, 2006
From cheesecake pinups to unrepentant harpies to zaftig grandmothers, Shelley Winters played them all, in a career that spanned more than a half century. In her later years, Winters, who died Saturday at 85, had become more of a personality than an actress: better known for pouring ice on an unrepentantly chauvinistic Oliver Reed during a 1972 Tonight Show appearance than for winning two Oscars or for teaching at the famed Actor's Studio. Two tell-all autobiographies, published in 1980 (Shelley)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Vivienne Shub, who played eccentric personalities as she delighted Baltimore theater audiences during a long and lauded run here, died of heart failure Thursday morning at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former Liberty Heights resident was 95. "Vivienne was one of the most talented actresses on the Baltimore scene," said Rhea Feiken, the television personality who performed with her. "You learned a lesson every time you watched her. Her dedication to the theater was enormous.
FEATURES
March 24, 1992
Best actress is another of those Oscar categories with two nominees from one picture competing, meaning that as with best supporting actor, the five nominees come from four 1991 movies. The two-fer in the actress competition is for the female buddy picture, "Thelma & Louise." Oscar winners will be announced at the annual televised Academy Awards ceremony March 30.The Evening Sun would like to know which actress you feel should win: Geena Davis, "Thelma & Louise"; Susan Sarandon, "Thelma & Louise"; Laura Dern, "Rambling Rose"; Jodie Foster, "The Silence of the Lambs," or Bette Midler, "For the Boys."
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 9, 1991
Mildred Dunnock, the actress who pleaded that "attention must be paid" to the downtrodden Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman," died at age 90 Friday in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.Best known for creating the role of Linda Loman opposite Lee J. Cobb in the 1949 Broadway production of the Arthur Miller play, the Baltimore-born actress reprised the part on television and in the 1951 film, for which she received an Academy Award nomination.Four months ago she was honored here by her alma mater, Goucher College, which named the two-story teaching theater in the new Meyerhoff Arts Center the Mildred Dunnock Theatre.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
ACTRESS Elizabeth Van Dyke, who earlier this year portrayed a vengeful mother determined to kill the murderer of her 3-year-old son on "L.A. Law," says she is taking on an even greater creative challenge in the Center Stage production of "The Queen and the Rebels" by Ugo Betti.Cast in the title role of the elusive Queen, Van Dyke describes her character as "the once-proud wife of the deposed dictator of a European country whose life was miraculously spared in a mass execution of the old regime's leaders."
FEATURES
March 13, 1991
The Academy Awards will be announced March 25, but movie critic Lou Cedrone wants to know who your favorites are. This week we are asking you to call SUNDIAL to tell him your choices for best director, best picture, best actor and best actress. The results will be published next week in Accent.Today, tell Lou your choice for best actress: Kathy Bates, "Misery"; Anjelica Huston, "The Grifters"; Julia Roberts, "Pretty Woman"; Meryl Streep, "Postcards From the Edge"; Joanne Woodward, "Mr. & Mrs. Bridge."
NEWS
By N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
Greer Garson, the actress who epitomized a noble, wise and courageous wife in some of the most sentimental American movies of the 1940s, died yesterday at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. She was 92.Miss Garson had a history of heart problems.She became an instant success as a captivating young wife in the sentimental 1939 film "Goodbye, Mr. Chips." She was nominated for an Academy Award and quickly became one of the 10 most popular Hollywood stars.She received five more Oscar nominations in five years for her roles in "Blossoms in the Dust" (1941)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | November 9, 2008
Jennifer L. Johnson, an aspiring actress who had performed in college and community theatrical productions, died of a brain aneurysm Oct. 29 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Hamilton resident was 27. Jennifer Lee Johnson was born in Elkins, W.Va., and raised in Cockeysville and Parkton. Ms. Johnson was a 1999 graduate of Hereford High School, where she was a volleyball player and actress. "Since she was 8 years old, she planned to be an actress," said her father, John J. Johnson of Parkton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Tana Hicken, a Baltimore actress and teacher who deftly portrayed a wide variety of characters on stage during a professional career that spanned more than four decades, died Aug. 17 at her home in Sparks of myositis, an autoimmune disorder. She was 70. "I think she was the finest stage actress I've ever witnessed in my life. She was just riveting," said Vince Lancisi, founder of Everyman Theatre , who first saw Ms. Hicken at Washington's Arena Stage when he was a student at the Catholic University of America.
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | July 4, 2014
When I spoke to Liz Cassedy during the height of our freezing polar vortex this winter, it was like twisting the cap off a bottle of sparkling Champagne. Her effervescent, adventurous spirit was the balm I needed for my annual unwanted visitor: Seasonal Affective Disorder. Liz helps you see in the dark. Liz, 25, a Reservoir High grad, took the plunge a while back and moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of being in show business. During our talk, she was blunt about her travails.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Marlo Thomas is an actress, an activist, an author and most recognizable as the face of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., founded by her father, comedian Danny Thomas. She is also the editor of a new collection of women's stories, "It Ain't Over … Reinventing Your Life and Realizing Your Dreams — Anytime, at Any Age. " Thomas, who lives in New York and Connecticut with her husband of more than 30 years, pioneering talk-show host Phil Donahue, will be at The Baltimore Sun Book Club on Wednesday to talk to readers about her new book.
NEWS
December 15, 2013
Here at the editorial board of The Sun, we like to give Columbia a little good-natured ribbing from time to time. James Rouse's planned community has gotten enough critical accolades in the national press since its opening in 1967 - for its efforts at integration of races and classes, suburban amenities like pools and paths and even its stab at interdenominational harmony with shared "interfaith centers" - that we assumed it could handle a few laughs...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Another bright star of old Hollywood is gone. Eleanor Parker, who received three Academy Award nominations, including for her inspired portrayal of soprano Marjorie Lawrence in the 1955 film "Interrupted Melody," died Monday in Palm Springs. She was 91 .  She did memorable work over a long career, spanning such diverse fare as the edgy (now a bit campy) "Caged" and "The Sound of Music" (playing the baroness). I have a particular affection for her work in "Interrupted Melody," where Ms. Parker displayed not just an impressive level of acting, but also an ability to handle the vocal scenes convincingly.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Ellen Irene Rhudy, a writer and activist for Patapsco Valley environmental causes who also performed in community theater productions, died of complications from leukemia Nov. 24 at Howard County General Hospital. The Marriottsville resident was 69. Born Ellen Strauss in Baltimore and raised on Greystone Road in Arbutus, she was the daughter of Charles F. Strauss, a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory model builder, and his wife, the former Irene Stephan, a homemaker. She was a 1962 graduate of Catonsville High School.
NEWS
By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 1993
Claudia McNeil, a character actress best known for her stage and screen role as the Sidney Poitier character's mother in "Raisin in the Sun," died Nov. 25 at the Actors Fund Nursing Home in Englewood, N.J., of complications to diabetes.Miss McNeil, who was born in Baltimore, was 77 and had lived in the home for nine years."When I saw that face, I knew that we'd found the mother for my play," playwright Lorraine Hansberry said after she cast Miss McNeil for "Raisin in the Sun," which is about a struggling black family on Chicago's South Side.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | June 2, 1993
Basically, talk shows give Kathryn Harrold the creeps."I want everyone to stay home and live their lives, instead of being interviewed about them," says the actress -- which may explain why she's delighted to star as Garry Shandling's new love interest (and first ex-wife) on HBO's talk-show parody, "The Larry Sanders Show," which begins its second season tonight at 10.Praised by critics and funny people everywhere, the show chronicles the insecurity behind the glib polish of most talk shows.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Jean E. Hill, a Baltimore model and actress who later performed in three John Waters films, died Wednesday of renal failure at Mercy Medical Center. She was 67. "Jean Hill was my only African-American star. She was a talented comedian, a brave actress and a much valued member of the Dreamland acting gang I worked with in my movies," said Mr. Waters. "She had a personality almost too large for show business, and she startled closed-minded people in every level of society. Sometimes raunchy in her public life, Jean was always classy in her private one, and underneath it all was a real lady," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2013
It's difficult to imagine what Laura Moriarty's four novels would have been like if she had chosen a place to live other than Kansas, with its endless wheat fields and abundance of ordinary light. Moriarty, 42, focuses her gaze on the most common, everyday things in the world - a single mom cooking a grilled cheese sandwich, a visit to the convenience store - and finds in them characters and events of remarkable depth, complexity and variety. Though the author is a Marine's daughter who was born in Hawaii and spent her childhood in places renowned for their physical beauty, she decided as an adult to settle in Kansas.
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