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By Reed Hellman | October 30, 2013
For Catonsville Children's Theatre founder and executive director, Nick Gough, and his wife, Barbara, enabling children to act is the goal, not memorizing lines or rote repetition of a script. Nick said the young actors are considered "partners" and encouraged to take ownership in each production. While the group does perform some scripted shows, most are what the Goughs call original productions in which the young actors create and develop their own characters. "It's a process-oriented, child-driven philosophy that encourages confidence and self esteem and erases fear," Nick said.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" opens the 55th season for Prince George's Little Theatre, and the production at Bowie Playhouse qualifies as the troupe's strongest start in recent memory. This is inspired theater by every measure, starting with the choice of the largely autobiographical 1968 work by Simon, which traces his adolescent years, to begin what became known as his Eugene Trilogy. Perhaps because of frequent stagings of "The Odd Couple" and other favorites at regional theaters, Simon is sometimes dismissed as a master of the one-liner but lacking in substance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
"Stones in His Pockets," a play about an American film company invading a community in rural Ireland, has more than a dozen characters, but only two actors. That means a lot of quick switches between genders, ages and, above all, accents. For its production of this work by Irish playwright Marie Jones, Center Stage started with a pair of versatile performers - Clinton Brandhagen, an Everyman Theatre resident member; and New York-based Todd Lawson. Then the company brought in a dialect expert to help those disparate voices ring true.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will host a former North Korean detainee, the hiker whose accident was adapted into the movie "127 Hours," and actors from "Breaking Bad" and "The Office," among several other speakers this fall. The university's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium will feature journalist Laura Ling, who was detained in North Korea in 2009; former National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon; hiker Aron Ralston; RJ Mitte, who played Flynn on "Breaking Bad"; and B.J. Novak, who played Ryan on "The Office.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1995
When Manchester Volunteer Fire Company puts on its annual spring comedy, the laughs that the play elicits are as much from the actors as from the characters they portray and the script.A seemingly natural group of clowns, these firefighters and their friends make themselves laugh so much that it is sometimes a wonder they get through the production.For instance, at Tuesday's rehearsal, Janet Bangert, playing the lead role in "The Eager Miss Beaver," had the cast laughing so hard at her exaggerated country "hick" drawl that practice momentarily halted.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2000
The big revelation of "The Big Kahuna" is that we're all salesmen, whether we're selling our products or ourselves. Forgive me for being underwhelmed. Unimaginatively directed and too stagebound for the big screen, "The Big Kahuna" features Kevin Spacey and Danny DeVito as industrial-lubricant salesmen determined to land a big client. They'd also like to break in their new partner, who has the peculiar notion there are more important things in life than the hard sell. Spacey is Larry, a smooth talker who, when he's not pitching a product, is being brutally honest with anyone unfortunate enough to be within earshot.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck | July 13, 2004
Broadway producers and actors reached a tentative agreement on a four-year contract yesterday, narrowly averting what would have been the second strike in less than 18 months. "The contract will serve our industry and theatergoers well, keeping Broadway strong in New York and creating more opportunities on the road," said a joint statement released by the Actors' Equity Association and the League of American Theatres and Producers. Details of the tentative agreement were not immediately available.
FEATURES
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2008
HOLLYWOOD -- Heightening fears of an actors' strike this summer, one of Hollywood's two major performers unions voted Saturday to break off its 27-year joint bargaining relationship with the Screen Actors Guild, leaving each to negotiate separate new contracts with the major studios. The 11th-hour move by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists is the latest thunderclap in Hollywood's winter of discontent, which has seen the television industry upended by a 100-day strike by screenwriters.
NEWS
By JOHN HORN and JOHN HORN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Like any unknown actor looking for his big break, Khalid Abdalla was eager to be cast in a movie, especially a studio production. Yet when the 25-year-old performer heard about a possible lead part in a forthcoming Universal Studios film, Abdalla considered turning it down. The hesitation was understandable: The acting job was playing Ziad Jarrah, the hijacker at the controls of the Sept. 11 jetliner that crashed into a Pennsylvania field, killing all 40 passengers and crew on board, in United 93. As filmmakers tell a number of stories about Sept.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
Whether Bill Largess is teaching grown-ups or kids, he finds that the basic misconception about acting is the same. "They think it's learning the lines and getting up on a stage and saying them with everybody looking at you," Largess says. Playing a character who really wants something - someone who is strongly "motivated," to use the actors' term - "is really a new idea for a lot of them." That is one of the fundamentals taught by Largess, Bruce Nelson and Peggy Yates at Rep Stage's Actors' Summer Institute at Howard Community College, where Shakespeare is the theme this summer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
We knew Frank Underwood could cheat, connive, even murder. But sing? Apparently so. Actor Kevin Spacey, whose malevolent "House of Cards" character has schemed his way to the U.S. presidency, will be showcasing (we hope) an entirely different side of his talents when he takes to the concert stage at D.C.'s Shakespeare Theatre on Sept. 29. The Oscar-winning actor, whose "House of Cards" is currently filming its third season here in Baltimore, told the Associated Press his show will feature some Billy Joel, some Simon & Garfunkel and some Frank Sinatra, along with some storytelling and "a surprise guest or two. " He'll be backed by a 40-piece orchestra.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
I love the Entertainment Weekly covers this week that show Kevin Spacey and Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the shoes, shirt, blouse and suits of each other's presidential character. It reminded me how lucky Baltimore is to have these remarkable actors making two of the best series ever on television here in Baltimore in 2014. One of the reasons they are so great is because they are so fearless as actors. Dressing up as each other's presidential TV character (Frank Underwood and Selina Meyer)
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Anwan Glover, who appeared in three seasons of "The Wire," was stabbed inside a Washington D.C. nightclub early Sunday, police said. About 2 a.m. Sunday, a man approached Glover inside the Cafe Asia nightclub in the 1700 block of I Street in Northwest Washington and struck him several times, according to the police report. As the assault escalated, Glover fell to the floor and was stabbed once in the torso, the report said. He was treated at George Washington University Hospital and later released.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
NEWS
By Pat Farmer | July 1, 2014
Looking for something different to write about, I decided to attend an event June 26 at the Bain Center, in Columbia, sponsored by Karen Hull, the mental health coordinator for the Howard County Department on Aging. The Mental Health Players' performance "Keys on the Road to Better Aging" highlighted conflicts between individuals and used a narrator to facilitate audience responses. The volunteer actors, part of the Mental Health Association of Maryland, have provided presentations to audiences for over 20 years.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
The drug dealers at the town meeting yesterday shooting at each other while a 7-year-old boy was caught in the middle of the fracas were actors -- their weapons cap guns. But the audience members knew the act well."This is very, very close to what is real," said Baltimore Police Maj. Ronald Collins after actors from Morgan State University played out a scene in which one dealer brags that he doesn't need to go to college because he makes plenty of money selling drugs.The Monumental City Bar Association, a group of 400 black attorneys, sponsored the town meeting at Calvary Baptist Church at 3911 Garrison Blvd.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 1993
NEW YORK -- If the charges against James Powers are true, he must be quite an actor because most of the people he is said to have fooled are actors. Over several years he won their confidence, became their friend, took over their financial affairs and, prosecutors say, took their money.He is charged with stealing more than $50,000 from an actress on "L.A. Law" and more than $150,000 from a star of "The Guiding Light." In perhaps the greatest testament to his skill at illusion, he is accused of successfully impersonating actress Jane Alexander over the telephone while bilking her and her husband of more than $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2014
Ever wonder what the circus was like 70 years ago? Ask the performers of the Happenstance Theater. The visual, poetic theater company will be putting on its own version of what goes down under the big top with "Impossible! A Happenstance Circus," opening Friday and running through June 1 at Theatre Project . "The show is a theatrical collage of circus in the '30s and '40s. It's a bright and colorful evening, full of music, movement, humor, and wonder," said Gwen Grastorf, 32, of Takoma Park.
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