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By Sarah Lindenfeld and Sarah Lindenfeld,Contributing Writer Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | June 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Kweisi Mfume warned the White House and the Republican Party yesterday that supporters of affirmative action might stage protests if the government scales back such programs.The Baltimore Democrat, speaking as chairman of a Congressional Black Caucus task force on affirmative action, called on lawmakers to consult with leaders of minority groups and women's groups before making any changes to affirmative action programs.Wading into an issue that could become a divisive one in next year's presidential election, Mr. Mfume also urged President Clinton to act cautiously on affirmative action or risk alienating minority voters who could be critical to his chances for re-election.
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NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Until she attended a Head Start preschool program, 3-year-old Jazmine Moore used to pull her mother toward the kitchen to signal she wanted something to drink. "If I gave her milk instead of juice, she would fall out," or have a temper tantrum, recalled Tenesha Moore, a Govans resident. But after the little girl began spending her days in a program that helps children develop verbal and social skills, her mother said, Jazmine learned to speak in complete sentences -- and is likely to be ready for school by the time she turns 5. Stories like Jazmine's are the exception, however, mainly because of insufficient outreach to Baltimore families and lack of coordination among agencies that provide early-childhood services, according to a coalition of 50 community leaders and groups that has studied school readiness.
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NEWS
By Steven Lubet | June 25, 2003
SUPPORTERS OF affirmative action are cheering the Supreme Court's set of decisions in two cases from the University of Michigan on Monday that seem to endorse the limited use of racial preferences in university admissions. Unfortunately, the practical result may be nearly the opposite as the court's ruling contains a virtual road map for years of continuing litigation in which many affirmative action programs are very likely to lose. In Grutter vs. Bollinger, the court approved the University of Michigan law school's "holistic" use of racial preferences because they guaranteed each applicant a "highly individualized" review.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2003
Balancing a dessert tray while she walked among packed tables, Caroline Gould stopped at each one to offer an assortment of cakes, pies, cookies, doughnuts and pastries to homeless men, women and children seated in the Beans and Bread Outreach Center in Baltimore's Fells Point. "One man asked for a cinnamon bun," Gould said after her 2 1/2 -hour shift. "I didn't have any and told him I was sorry." But she later found one of the pastries in the kitchen, and delivered it to his table. "He was happy when I brought it out."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich said yesterday that racial prejudice continues to limit opportunities for black Americans, but added that he thinks it is possible for everyone to succeed without affirmative action programs that require federal government or legal assistance."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 17, 1995
Despite almost three decades of affirmative action, the glass ceiling is still an impenetrable barrier to the advancement of women and minorities, a Labor Department report says.Although women and minorities make up two-thirds of the nation's working population, the corporate hierarchy is overwhelmingly male and white, according to a federal Glass Ceiling Commission report released Wednesday.The bipartisan commission reported that 97 percent of the senior managers at 1,500 industrial Fortune 1000 and Fortune 500 corporations are white and almost all of them are men. Only 5 percent of all Fortune 2000 industrial and service company managers are women, and virtually all are white, the report said.
NEWS
October 17, 1995
CITIES SUCH as Baltimore with affirmative action programs that guarantee African-American and woman-owned companies a share of city business know such plans are endangered. The U.S. Supreme Court in its last term took away a portion of the federal government's power to use affirmative action programs. And several Republican presidential contenders plan to make affirmative action a whipping boy. Given this mood, either Congress or the Supreme Court could defuse Baltimore's MBE/WBE program.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The chairwoman of the Senate committee that will hold hearings on affirmative action says that she expects Congress to make major changes in policies aimed at increasing the number of women and minorities in the workplace.Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, R-Kan., said yesterday she opposes government-set goals, quotas and contract set-asides -- three central parts of the affirmative action programs that have been established by the federal government over the last few decades.Ms. Kassebaum, chairman of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, said she supports outreach programs to improve access to jobs for women and minorities, but objects to numerical preferences.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Plunging into a contentious legal and political arena, the White House announced yesterday that the administration had decided to join a challenge to the constitutionality of a successful California ballot initiative that bans affirmative action programs by the state and its local governments.The Justice Department had recommended the administration's intervention after concluding that the ballot initiative, Proposition 209, approved by California's voters last month, violated the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment.
NEWS
By Steven A. Holmes and Steven A. Holmes,New York Times News Service | November 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is expected to direct all federal agencies today to phase out regulations authorizing the use of racial preferences and quotas in hiring and promotions when he signs the recently passed civil rights bill. The regulations affect all companies as well as federal agencies.A senior administration official said yesterday evening that the president's action, which is spelled out in a statement prepared for release today, is intended to underscore his continuing opposition to affirmative action programs that give "unfair preferences" to minorities or women.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | June 25, 2003
SUPPORTERS OF affirmative action are cheering the Supreme Court's set of decisions in two cases from the University of Michigan on Monday that seem to endorse the limited use of racial preferences in university admissions. Unfortunately, the practical result may be nearly the opposite as the court's ruling contains a virtual road map for years of continuing litigation in which many affirmative action programs are very likely to lose. In Grutter vs. Bollinger, the court approved the University of Michigan law school's "holistic" use of racial preferences because they guaranteed each applicant a "highly individualized" review.
TOPIC
By Lynne K. Varner and Tom Brune | August 1, 1999
CYNTHIA Hamilton, an African-American automotive-factory worker in Toledo, Ohio, agrees with many whites that a colorblind America would be wonderful. But that's an impossible dream, Hamilton says. And, she adds, "because there are so many prejudices against us because of the color of our skin, there has to be something there to make up for that." That "something," in her view: affirmative action. A recent Seattle Times national poll explored Americans' feelings about discrimination, opportunity and affirmative action.
NEWS
May 23, 1997
BY SPEAKING at Morgan State University's commencement program last Sunday, President Clinton provided a powerful symbolic message about the importance of higher education to African Americans. Historically black colleges and universities such as Morgan attract students on their own merit. For too long, though, they also have provided recourse for African Americans denied entrance into white institutions.Court decisions have made it harder to use race as a criteria to recruit students. As a result, predominantly black schools still offer the best chance for an affordable college education for many African Americans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Plunging into a contentious legal and political arena, the White House announced yesterday that the administration had decided to join a challenge to the constitutionality of a successful California ballot initiative that bans affirmative action programs by the state and its local governments.The Justice Department had recommended the administration's intervention after concluding that the ballot initiative, Proposition 209, approved by California's voters last month, violated the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
Sobered by a surge in drug crimes, assault and malicious destruction last year, Taneytown residents are looking to forge tighter links with city police and have begun exploring the possibility of an organized neighborhood watch program.Although serious crime remains relatively rare in the community of about 5,000, the annual crime statistics issued late last month confirm a significant rise in several categories, among them:* Narcotics violations, which rose to 70 cases from 30 the year before, an increase of 133 percent.
NEWS
October 17, 1995
CITIES SUCH as Baltimore with affirmative action programs that guarantee African-American and woman-owned companies a share of city business know such plans are endangered. The U.S. Supreme Court in its last term took away a portion of the federal government's power to use affirmative action programs. And several Republican presidential contenders plan to make affirmative action a whipping boy. Given this mood, either Congress or the Supreme Court could defuse Baltimore's MBE/WBE program.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Carl M. Cannon and Sarah Lindenfeld of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | June 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, saying it has let the federal government go too far with affirmative action, ruled 5-4 yesterday that national programs based on race must satisfy the toughest constitutional test or be struck down.In one of its most important decisions on the issue since it first allowed a racial preference 17 years ago, the court declared that Congress and federal agencies may use race-based benefits only as a last resort, and only when needed to meet "compelling" policy needs.
NEWS
March 26, 1995
When a forest fire is headed your way, that is not the time to be planting more trees. It's the time to protect what you have.A forest fire of public opposition is headed toward Maryland's -- ,, and everybody else's -- affirmative action programs. Yet Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Democrats in the General Assembly are not only working to save affirmative action in its present form, they are trying to expand it. This is bad politics.It is true that candidate Glendening campaigned on the promise to do more for minority businesses, and he owes his election to the fact that blacks responded and voted solidly for him. Would he be guilty of bad faith if he reneged?
NEWS
July 17, 1995
The Northeast Social Action Program's Community Clothing Store is open for business from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays in the building behind St. John's United Methodist Church at 1205 N. Main St., Hampstead.Men's, women's and children's clothing and accessories are available at nominal prices. The store also has a costume rack and new/nearly new racks.Information: 239-6216.FIRE* Manchester: Manchester and Hampstead responded for a fire alarm in the 2400 block of Cape Horn Road at 1:05 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, in a long-awaited statement on affirmative action next week, is expected to offer a spirited defense of granting preferences by race and gender in such areas as hiring, promotions and college admissions.The speech, scheduled for next Wednesday, will offer a clear contrast on this emotional subject between the president and the Republicans vying for the right to challenge him next year, according to White House aides, members of Congress who spoke to Mr. Clinton yesterday and civil rights activists.
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