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By Matt Vensel | February 14, 2011
A few months removed from his popular appearances in those amazing Old Spice commercials, Ravens linebacker and action hero Ray Lewis is at it again. This time, Lewis has teamed up with Saints quarterback Drew Brees for a Pepsi Maxx commercial in the form of a two-minute movie trailer for a fictional movie entitled "The Bottle Attacks!" Well, at least I think it's fictional. I really wish it wasn't, though. While blowing up Saturn for Old Spice , Lewis showed America his sense of humor and that he doesn't take himself too seriously.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 14, 2011
A few months removed from his popular appearances in those amazing Old Spice commercials, Ravens linebacker and action hero Ray Lewis is at it again. This time, Lewis has teamed up with Saints quarterback Drew Brees for a Pepsi Maxx commercial in the form of a two-minute movie trailer for a fictional movie entitled "The Bottle Attacks!" Well, at least I think it's fictional. I really wish it wasn't, though. While blowing up Saturn for Old Spice , Lewis showed America his sense of humor and that he doesn't take himself too seriously.
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NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
If you saw Vin Diesel on Late Night with Conan O'Brien last week, you had to feel for the guy. There he was on a hip talk show, trying to spin a funny-scary anecdote about a snowmobile nearly crushing him during a stunt for Babylon A.D., his DOA action film, and no one was laughing or applauding. The chuckles only came when O'Brien compared him to Wile E. Coyote. Then Diesel showed a clip from the movie, and you could see why he had the audience confused. The clip had nothing to do with that stunt: It was full of post-Matrix, follow-the-flying-projectile effects that had no payoff except a major explosion.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
If you saw Vin Diesel on Late Night with Conan O'Brien last week, you had to feel for the guy. There he was on a hip talk show, trying to spin a funny-scary anecdote about a snowmobile nearly crushing him during a stunt for Babylon A.D., his DOA action film, and no one was laughing or applauding. The chuckles only came when O'Brien compared him to Wile E. Coyote. Then Diesel showed a clip from the movie, and you could see why he had the audience confused. The clip had nothing to do with that stunt: It was full of post-Matrix, follow-the-flying-projectile effects that had no payoff except a major explosion.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- In his first days out of prison on charges he'd rather not talk about, the new Muslim television character Darwyn Al-Hakim barges into a Southern California synagogue during prayers, tails a teenager targeted for a grisly death and joins in the stoning murder of a fellow terrorist accused of betraying the cause. He also reports back on his activities to his colleagues in the FBI. In Al-Hakim, played by University of Maryland graduate Michael Ealy, the creators of the new Showtime series Sleeper Cell say they have developed America's first Muslim action hero: an undercover anti-terror agent who infiltrates a band of bad guys bent on destruction in the name of Islam.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 18, 1993
"Last Action Hero" turns out to be just what we needed least: an $80 million Pirandello play.The latest romp through testosteroneland under the sponsorship and guidance of Arnold Schwarzenegger, "Last Action Hero" is at least suffused with enough self-deprecating wit to keep it from becoming truly annoying. Yet it remains more remote than it should be because of the disease of gargantuanism: It seems bloated on steroids, a blubbery mass of protoplasm whose lard almost obscures its meager strand of meaning.
FEATURES
By David J. Fox and David J. Fox,Los Angeles Times | June 21, 1993
HollywoodIf Columbia Pictures hadn't spent some $80 million to produce "Last Action Hero," and if the fantasy-action film didn't star the world's biggest box-office attraction, then a $15.2 million opening weekend might look good.But those are big ifs.The reality is that "Last Action Hero" had an opening that, by industry standards, was a disappointment, considering its budget, its star Arnold Schwarzenegger and the promotion that surrounded it.The $15.2 million in ticket sales fell short of the $20 million that Columbia Pictures projected last week for the first weekend.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 13, 1993
You always have to wonder why they do it.A film star may be a great actor or a lousy actor, but his talent is pretty much irrelevant, as witness Clint Eastwood or Arnold Schwarzenegger, who have never demonstrated gobs of it. What counts is that he builds a screen identity that becomes his persona, that is consistent picture to picture, that represents something in which a significant portion of the public can emotionally invest, that represents, in short,...
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher | August 23, 2007
Jason Statham's acting career began on the sidewalks of Argyle Street in London. Sitting on a milk crate with a suitcase of bogus jewelry, the young street hustler said whatever it took to persuade tourists to buy gold chains that would turn green by the time they flew home. "That was street theater. It was called fly pitching. You work with a team - some people in the crowd, some guys who stand lookout for the police. Those were the most lucrative days of my youth," Statham says. Later, Statham would be introduced to a young filmmaker named Guy Ritchie who was looking to pepper the cast of his new crime film with nonactors whose faces evoked London's seedier pubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel Fienberg and Daniel Fienberg,ZAP2IT.COM | September 8, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Indiana Jones hasn't cracked his bullwhip in more than 15 years. John McClane hasn't helped anybody die with any difficulty in 10. The Terminator is the governor of California and James Bond is a mystery man. Where are the action heroes of yesteryear? Jason Statham is not one to shy away from the "action hero" label. "There's nothing wrong with it," he says. "It's nice. It's a funny title to wear, actually. Once you start doing stuff and doing your own stunts you are considered an action hero.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher | August 23, 2007
Jason Statham's acting career began on the sidewalks of Argyle Street in London. Sitting on a milk crate with a suitcase of bogus jewelry, the young street hustler said whatever it took to persuade tourists to buy gold chains that would turn green by the time they flew home. "That was street theater. It was called fly pitching. You work with a team - some people in the crowd, some guys who stand lookout for the police. Those were the most lucrative days of my youth," Statham says. Later, Statham would be introduced to a young filmmaker named Guy Ritchie who was looking to pepper the cast of his new crime film with nonactors whose faces evoked London's seedier pubs.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2007
Hollywood has done what the biggest and baddest professional wrestlers never could. It got a hold on "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and wouldn't let go until he gave in. The former World Wrestling Entertainment competitor, who said in a 2003 interview that if a good acting role "got dumped in my lap, I'm cool with that, but it's not something I care to pursue," now hopes to pin down a career as an action star. Austin, who was at the forefront of the wrestling boom in the late 1990s before neck injuries forced him out of the ring four years ago, makes his debut as a lead actor in the action thriller The Condemned, which opens today.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- In his first days out of prison on charges he'd rather not talk about, the new Muslim television character Darwyn Al-Hakim barges into a Southern California synagogue during prayers, tails a teenager targeted for a grisly death and joins in the stoning murder of a fellow terrorist accused of betraying the cause. He also reports back on his activities to his colleagues in the FBI. In Al-Hakim, played by University of Maryland graduate Michael Ealy, the creators of the new Showtime series Sleeper Cell say they have developed America's first Muslim action hero: an undercover anti-terror agent who infiltrates a band of bad guys bent on destruction in the name of Islam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel Fienberg and Daniel Fienberg,ZAP2IT.COM | September 8, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Indiana Jones hasn't cracked his bullwhip in more than 15 years. John McClane hasn't helped anybody die with any difficulty in 10. The Terminator is the governor of California and James Bond is a mystery man. Where are the action heroes of yesteryear? Jason Statham is not one to shy away from the "action hero" label. "There's nothing wrong with it," he says. "It's nice. It's a funny title to wear, actually. Once you start doing stuff and doing your own stunts you are considered an action hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 21, 2004
There are at least two Nicolas Cage personae. One is the wildly eccentric, Oscar-winning character of Leaving Las Vegas, as well as similar loose cannons in Adaptation, Raising Arizona and Wild at Heart. The other is the action hero of The Rock, Con Air and Gone in 60 Seconds. National Treasure, which opened Friday, combines both of them. Cage plays an eccentric, scholarly treasure hunter who seeks riches possibly buried by our Founding Fathers, who wanted to prevent the booty from falling into British hands.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
She's neither faster than a speeding bullet, nor able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Yet the Librarian Action Figure could become a 21st-century superhero. Her mission: to promote the written word and celebrate the work that librarians do every day. Just how does a 5-inch-tall plastic doll achieve that? With her own baseball-style trading card, library facts, a check-out card -- and what the package calls her "amazing push-button shushing action." That blend of education and kitsch has helped sales boom at toy stores, booksellers and library gift shops across the country, including Baltimore.
NEWS
By Stephen Kinzer and Stephen Kinzer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 15, 2002
MOUNT VERNON, Va. - Say goodbye to the stern and remote George Washington, the boring one who wore a powdered wig, had wooden teeth and always told the truth. Embrace instead the action hero of the 18th century, a swashbuckling warrior who survived wild adventures, led brilliant military campaigns, directed spy rings and fell in love with his best friend's wife. That is the new message from the people who run Mount Vernon, the estate where Washington spent much of his life and where more than 1 million people go each year to learn about him. Stirred to action by what they say is an appalling decline in what visitors know about Washington, they have embarked on a radical course.
FEATURES
By Rick Lyman and Rick Lyman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES - The tag line for Revolution Studios' stunt-packed action flick, XXX refers to its tattooed, thrill-addicted hero, played by Vin Diesel, as "a new breed of secret agent." In ads for this summer's successful thriller The Bourne Identity, Universal Pictures alerts audiences that in Matt Damon, the film's star, "a new action hero is Bourne!" And there is a lot of Hollywood gossip these days about just who the director Wolfgang Petersen will choose to play his battling heroes in Batman vs. Superman, Warner Brothers' attempt to breathe life into two dormant film franchises by peopling them with action stars of a more contemporary hue. Here's the deal: Charles Bronson is out of the game.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 26, 2003
Can a movie starring an inanimate object really move? It can if that object is a rock - or, to be more precise, The Rock, a professional wrestler whose surprisingly adroit acting muscles are on full display in The Rundown, an action-adventure flick that could turn into this generation's Raiders of the Lost Ark. Like Raiders, this movie flatly refuses to take itself seriously. It also exists as a series of chases and pitched battles strung together under the guise of a quest for some precious object (in this case, an idol revered by a town of South American slave laborers)
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 2003
CANNES, France - Arnold Schwarzenegger worked the crowd outside the Carlton hotel as if it were a dumbbell rising and falling to the demands of his bread-loaf biceps. He introduced the machines of Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, and fans spilling over onto the Croisette cheered every promotion-packed word. The recent Cannes Film Festival served as the launch pad for Schwarzenegger's first go-round as the cyborg since 1991's T2. "I look out there, and I say, `My dear messengers, go home, spread the good word,'" Schwarzenegger says later inside the hotel.
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