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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- GI Joe has gotten huge. Impossibly, seam-splittingly, unattainably huge. And that could mean big trouble for little boys.A new analysis of the changing physiques of action figures, by Harvard psychiatrist Dr. Harrison G. Pope, shows that today's figures -- from Joe to Batman to Luke Skywalker -- are rippling with huge pecs, delts and triceps they didn't have decades ago.Scaled to human size, the biceps of a GI Joe Extreme measure 26 inches around....
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Tonight is Crush Davis Action Figure night at Camden Yards, with the first 10,000 fans 14 and under getting a plastic action figure of Chris Davis as a caped crusader. The real Davis will begin the game on the bench. Last year's Most Valuable Oriole is hitting just .196 with 125 strikeouts in 321 at-bats this year. With Seattle's tough, young left-hander James Paxton on the mound, the left-handed-hitting Davis wasn't in the starting lineup. The first baseman also has been dealing with a flu virus that caused him to miss two full games earlier this week.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 30, 2002
With the recent warnings of possible future terrorist attacks, the whole subject of America's relationship to Islamic fundamentalism has become extremely touchy, and certainly no laughing matter. Yet artists can be notoriously irreverent, even to the point of making us chuckle at our own worst fears. The group show at St. Paul Art & Design Gallery brings together four young artists who all used to be roommates: painters Alex Kondner and William Marshall, sculptor Joshua Hershkovitz and photographer Paul Stoppi.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Once in a while, I'm reminded at how my younger son really is a tween - that awkward age between a child and a teenager. Not quite 12, he is just a bit shorter than I am. His voice is growing deeper and his shoulders broader. He used to want me to leave the hall light on until he fell asleep. Now he goes to bed and shuts the door. On the shelf where he used to have action figures, he now has cologne and deodorant. He tries on different hats, shirts and jeans, trying to get the right look.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | January 11, 1993
If your children really loved "Aladdin" and if you're really tired of repeat trips to the neighborhood movie house, you might curb their appetites for the animated Arabian romance by buying toy figures of the characters.Don't be surprised, though, if the action figures aren't exact replicas of Princess Jasmine, Abu, Iago, Jafar and Aladdin -- the protagonist hailed by Newsweek as Disney's "first nonwhite human hero since Mowgli of the 'Jungle Book.' "Margaret Freeman of Dallas, who is white, makes a point of buying ethnically diverse books and toys for her nephew, Travis.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Once in a while, I'm reminded at how my younger son really is a tween - that awkward age between a child and a teenager. Not quite 12, he is just a bit shorter than I am. His voice is growing deeper and his shoulders broader. He used to want me to leave the hall light on until he fell asleep. Now he goes to bed and shuts the door. On the shelf where he used to have action figures, he now has cologne and deodorant. He tries on different hats, shirts and jeans, trying to get the right look.
FEATURES
By Rachel Leibrock and Rachel Leibrock,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2005
SACRAMENTO - When it comes to Star Wars and toys, it's not just child's play. With Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith set to open in theaters May 19, fans are already feeling the force from a new batch of movie-related merchandise. But with everything from action figures to video games beckoning from the store shelf, where to begin? Since the 1977 release of the original Star Wars film, toys and other items have been hot property - for both kids and adult collectors. In fact, Star Wars toys are a rare when-worlds-collide example of a product line equally popular among mainstream shoppers and hobbyists, says James Bullock, who runs the Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Michael Horn likes playing with dolls, but he's not alone. The 32-year-old president and chief executive officer of Palisades Marketing LLC has built a nearly $3 million company making and selling action figure collectibles for kids and adults. Even with a slow economy this year, the 8-year-old company has continued to grow by 20 percent, Horn said, and is moving into new territory. As Horn looks for a space in Howard County to move Palisades Marketing out of Oella Mill in Ellicott City, he also is seeking to make products for a broader audience.
NEWS
By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2004
When Michael Horn graduated from what was then Towson State University in 1991 with a degree in English, he had no thought of starting a business, let alone one that would become an award-winning, multimillion-dollar company. In fact, he had no interest in studying business at all. "Everybody is surprised when they hear that," said Horn, 34, of Clarksville. "I did not take a single business course, except for business law, with the thought of maybe going into law. Everything I learned about business I learned from experience."
NEWS
January 3, 1994
THE FOLLOWING comes from our correspondent in Toyland:Now that the world has discovered the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, we figure the next news to come down the pike will be this: They're one of the worst-made toys you'll find.Our son got three "rangers" for the holidays from relatives. (No mean feat considering that Bandai Co. of Japan was able to produce only 600,000 of the action figures before Christmas against an estimated demand of 12 million pieces, according to the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | December 28, 2007
Some of the kids participating in Baltimore's 67th annual doll show yesterday were mostly just interested in the free ice skating planned after the judging. Not Destiny Cooke. The 10-year-old left no detail unattended as she dressed her My Twinn doll - named It's-A-Me - as herself. The girl and her inanimate companion wore matching white ribbons around their pigtails, matching wire-rimmed glasses, matching magenta V-neck sweaters, gray plaid kilts and black patent leather shoes. "I really think we may win this competition if we just hold our strength together," said Destiny, a fifth-grader at Dr. Nathan A. Pitts-Ashburton Elementary/Middle School.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
Mark Wahlberg proved himself a dynamo as a motormouth in The Departed, so it's disappointing to see him play the strong silent type in Shooter. Who ever thought that type was so American, anyway? From Davy Crockett to Crockett and Tubbs it's been hard to get American heroes to shut up. What was funny and charming about Gary Cooper in his early Western roles was that you could see his mind searching for more words than he knew how to pronounce and more thoughts than he could articulate. But Bob Lee Swagger is a man of no adjectives and few verbs or nouns.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | January 27, 2007
The good news is Maryland's long-term liability for retiree health benefits might not be nearly so big as the $20 billion lawmakers thought last year. The bad news, actuaries told legislators yesterday, is the state is still on the hook for about $14.5 billion in benefits. The change isn't because of any action the state has taken since a first set of consultants estimated a $20 billion liability last year, but rather because a new set of actuaries from Buck Consultants made different assumptions about how many retirees will be enrolled in the plans.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | January 1, 2007
He led his people out of slavery in Egypt, parted the Red Sea and received the Ten Commandments. Now, cast in plastic, he's poised to do battle in playrooms across the country. Meet the new Moses. His pecs ripple, his biceps bulge and his waist is narrow - just the right size to fit in a 5-year-old's sticky grip. The thick Charlton Heston beard is gone, and so is the wooden staff. This Moses is an action figure, armed with a tiny sword and shield. Teamed with an equally muscle-bound Samson, David and Noah, he's prepared to conquer the Christian toy market.
FEATURES
By BRENT HOPKINS and BRENT HOPKINS,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | February 20, 2006
MALIBU, Calif. -- In the black-and-gold plastic trunks, weighing in at 3 ounces, standing nearly 7 inches tall, hailing from a factory in China, the Italian Stallion: Rocky Balboa! The meat-punching, steps-sprinting, "Yo, Adrian!"-screaming boxer will live again, as toy manufacturer Jakks Pacific Inc. announced a licensing deal with MGM Consumer Products on Friday. Playing off the 30th anniversary of the original Rocky film and the expected-December release of the franchise's sixth installment, Rocky Balboa, Jakks will release a line of action figures and play sets tied to the series this fall.
FEATURES
By Rachel Leibrock and Rachel Leibrock,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2005
SACRAMENTO - When it comes to Star Wars and toys, it's not just child's play. With Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith set to open in theaters May 19, fans are already feeling the force from a new batch of movie-related merchandise. But with everything from action figures to video games beckoning from the store shelf, where to begin? Since the 1977 release of the original Star Wars film, toys and other items have been hot property - for both kids and adult collectors. In fact, Star Wars toys are a rare when-worlds-collide example of a product line equally popular among mainstream shoppers and hobbyists, says James Bullock, who runs the Pasadena, Calif.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | December 2, 1991
With the 1991 holiday season upon us, the jolly old sleigh driver, once again, has his job cut out for him.The North Pole elves have churned out a blizzard of products, and what kids will be clamoring for, according to retailers, runs the gamut. There's everything from remote controlled cars and Barbies that bathe to movie-inspired action figures such as Robin Hood -- and nearly anything mermaid.And, they say, as the craze for video games wanes somewhat, parents are returning tried-and-true favorites -- Lego, dolls, puzzles and games -- as gifts for their kids.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 1, 1998
IF YOU'RE A MAN, AT some point a woman will ask you how she looks."How do I look?" she'll ask.You must be careful how you answer this question. The best technique is to form an honest yet sensitive opinion, then collapse on the floor with some kind of fatal seizure. Trust me, this is the easiest way out. Because you will never come up with the right answer.The problem is that women generally do not think of their looks in the same way that men do. Most men form an opinion of how they look in seventh grade, and they stick to it for the rest of their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2004
Computer geeks can no longer be shoved into a locker and left to plead hopelessly through sixth period. They hold the keys. They are the masters of the deadly arts of the Internet. And often, they can buy you and sell you, and even create the Web site for your auction. In fact, they're becoming altogether hip. The revolution may not have been televised - though it has gotten some screen time, in the new film Napoleon Dynamite - but geek chic is on the rise. And now the once-derided have their unofficial poster boy: GeekMan.
NEWS
By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2004
When Michael Horn graduated from what was then Towson State University in 1991 with a degree in English, he had no thought of starting a business, let alone one that would become an award-winning, multimillion-dollar company. In fact, he had no interest in studying business at all. "Everybody is surprised when they hear that," said Horn, 34, of Clarksville. "I did not take a single business course, except for business law, with the thought of maybe going into law. Everything I learned about business I learned from experience."
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