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By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Less accessible to tourists than Little Italy, Greektown has experienced more ups and downs but has been steadily resurgent of late, and even with the arrival of places like the Habanero Grill, it still feels like a family affair here. After more than 20 years, the Acropolis remains something of the eternal middle child in the neighborhood. It might never attain the elder status of an Ikaros, the Greek restaurant that most defines Greektown to outsiders. But neither was it ever a bargain-dining find like Samos or a foodie darling like Zorba's, two of its younger neighbors.
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By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick , Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Less accessible to tourists than Little Italy, Greektown has experienced more ups and downs but has been steadily resurgent of late, and even with the arrival of places like the Habanero Grill, it still feels like a family affair here. After more than 20 years, the Acropolis remains something of the eternal middle child in the neighborhood. It might never attain the elder status of an Ikaros, the Greek restaurant that most defines Greektown to outsiders. But neither was it ever a bargain-dining find like Samos or a foodie darling like Zorba's, two of its younger neighbors.
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FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | December 27, 1990
The Acropolis is a good Greek restaurant. But not a great one. In other cities, this might be the standard for Greek fare, but in Baltimore, with its sizable Greek community and multiplicity of choice when it comes to eating Greek food, Acropolis comes up half a notch short -- both in what it serves and in the setting.Granted, it does have some very positive attributes, such as prices. For $6.95, you can have baked chicken with roasted potatoes. For $12.95, flounder stuffed with crab imperial.
TRAVEL
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 19, 2009
Easter has come and gone for some, but Athens marks the celebration of Pascha, Easter in the Greek Orthodox Church, Sunday. One of Greece's most important holidays, the event is celebrated with lamb markets, red-dyed eggs, flowers, candle lighting and church services. Visitors to Greece during this time will find a festive atmosphere, but large cities like Athens may be deserted as people return to villages to celebrate with family. Here are five things to do in and around Athens any time.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 29, 1998
The Acropolis is one of those Greektown restaurants that have been around forever but you never hear much about. Over the years it's been overshadowed by other Greek eateries, starting with Ikaros, the legendary restaurant known for its ethnic atmosphere, cheap but decent food and big portions.And then there was Taverna Athena, which opened in Harborplace and therefore had the distinction of being Baltimore's only Greek restaurant directly on the water. People flocked there to eat traditional Greek fare at one of the outdoor tables.
TRAVEL
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 19, 2009
Easter has come and gone for some, but Athens marks the celebration of Pascha, Easter in the Greek Orthodox Church, Sunday. One of Greece's most important holidays, the event is celebrated with lamb markets, red-dyed eggs, flowers, candle lighting and church services. Visitors to Greece during this time will find a festive atmosphere, but large cities like Athens may be deserted as people return to villages to celebrate with family. Here are five things to do in and around Athens any time.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 13, 2004
ATHENS -- Now, beneath the warm winds off the Saronic Gulf and under the glowing lights from the Acropolis, it's clear why the Greeks were so indignant. They gave the 1996 Olympics to Atlanta, over us? A belated apology to Greece is due. The centennial celebration of the rebirth of the modern Olympics was, indeed, held in the wrong place. Sure, there are T-shirts on sale here. There are trinkets and souvenirs, but it is only a tiny part of the landscape. The commercialism that doomed Atlanta to Olympic irrelevance is dwarfed by the ruins, the centuries, the history and the new goals of Greece.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 1, 1994
YANNI LIVE AT THE ACROPOLISYanni (Private Music 10058 21162)Even though he's often lumped in with the likes of Ray Lynch and Kitaro, Yanni is less a new age composer than an old-fashioned "beautiful music" bandleader. Instead of wooshing synths and airy atmospherics, what "Yanni Live at the Acropolis" delivers are the sort of soothing melodies and lush orchestrations one would expect from a latter-day Mantovani. That's not to say Yanni's music is entirely sedate; there's a surprising amount of funk to the bass-and-percussion break in ,, "The Rain Must Fall," and some fairly fierce fiddling at the end of "Standing in Motion."
NEWS
August 13, 1998
Richard Bilby, 67, a U.S. District judge who presided over such cases as the Charles Keating civil trial, collapsed and died Tuesday while walking his dog in Tucson, Ariz.Anna Harrison, 85, who in 1978 became the first woman elected president of the American Chemical Society, died Saturday of a stroke in South Hadley, Mass.Michael Kitson, 72, a leading art historian and professor in Britain and the United States, died Friday in London.Alvin R. Luedecke, 87, a retired Air Force major general who once headed the federal Atomic Energy Commission, died Sunday in San Antonio.
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | December 12, 1999
THE Greeks want to pick up their marbles and go home. These marbles are the famed Elgin ones on display in London since the 7th Earl of Elgin picked them up at bargain Acropolis prices a couple of hundred years ago. The deal amounted, more or less, to theft.Lord Elgin, British ambassador in those parts, was an admirer of Greek antiquities. He visited the Parthenon, liked what he saw and decided to take the best of it home. He offered the Turkish governor a pittance and a tidy sum on the side for his trouble.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 13, 2004
ATHENS -- Now, beneath the warm winds off the Saronic Gulf and under the glowing lights from the Acropolis, it's clear why the Greeks were so indignant. They gave the 1996 Olympics to Atlanta, over us? A belated apology to Greece is due. The centennial celebration of the rebirth of the modern Olympics was, indeed, held in the wrong place. Sure, there are T-shirts on sale here. There are trinkets and souvenirs, but it is only a tiny part of the landscape. The commercialism that doomed Atlanta to Olympic irrelevance is dwarfed by the ruins, the centuries, the history and the new goals of Greece.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 29, 1998
The Acropolis is one of those Greektown restaurants that have been around forever but you never hear much about. Over the years it's been overshadowed by other Greek eateries, starting with Ikaros, the legendary restaurant known for its ethnic atmosphere, cheap but decent food and big portions.And then there was Taverna Athena, which opened in Harborplace and therefore had the distinction of being Baltimore's only Greek restaurant directly on the water. People flocked there to eat traditional Greek fare at one of the outdoor tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 1, 1994
YANNI LIVE AT THE ACROPOLISYanni (Private Music 10058 21162)Even though he's often lumped in with the likes of Ray Lynch and Kitaro, Yanni is less a new age composer than an old-fashioned "beautiful music" bandleader. Instead of wooshing synths and airy atmospherics, what "Yanni Live at the Acropolis" delivers are the sort of soothing melodies and lush orchestrations one would expect from a latter-day Mantovani. That's not to say Yanni's music is entirely sedate; there's a surprising amount of funk to the bass-and-percussion break in ,, "The Rain Must Fall," and some fairly fierce fiddling at the end of "Standing in Motion."
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | December 27, 1990
The Acropolis is a good Greek restaurant. But not a great one. In other cities, this might be the standard for Greek fare, but in Baltimore, with its sizable Greek community and multiplicity of choice when it comes to eating Greek food, Acropolis comes up half a notch short -- both in what it serves and in the setting.Granted, it does have some very positive attributes, such as prices. For $6.95, you can have baked chicken with roasted potatoes. For $12.95, flounder stuffed with crab imperial.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2009
What do you get when you combine the Walters Art Museum's new exhibition, "Heroes: Mortals and Myths in Ancient Greece," and the Baltimore-Piraeus Sister City Committee fundraiser on the night before Halloween? You get one heckuva Greek party. Guests were greeted by event co-chairs Vasi Karas and Georgia Vavas, as well as the Greek goddess Athena, aka event committee member Gayle Economos - adorned in a golden toga and face makeup. "This is a place where Greeks feel at home," event honorary chairman Aris Melissaratos said as he nodded toward guests, including: Niki Marsh, Pinewood Elementary School speech and language pathologist; Kali Maheridis, DLA Piper controller; John Diokoulos, Acropolis Construction president; and Darlene Diokoulos, community volunteer.
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