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Acrobatics

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NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
In their sport, acrobatics, they're the nation's best girls of high school age or younger who compete as a trio. Period. Ellicott City's Becky Herzfeld and Ekaterina Randazzo and Columbia's Roksana Slavinsky earned that designation as a team last month in Louisville, Ky., at USA Gymnastics' 2005 Acrobatics National Championships. Their specialty is what some call sports acrobatics, sports acro, or just acrobatics. They train in a tucked-away gym in Columbia's Guilford Industrial Center that has just the faintest of signage but has a habit of sending young athletes around the nation and to Europe to compete - and coming home with medals.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Date: Aug. 2 Her story: Catherine "Cat" Yard, 25, grew up in Ewing, N.J. She is an artist and regularly models for figure drawing and painting classes at Maryland Institute College of Art , the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and the Mitchell School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. She and her husband are ensemble cast members performing with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society in "The Electric Pharaoh," which opens Oct. 17. Her parents, Kathleen and Duane Yard, live in Ewing.
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NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | August 10, 2003
SUMMER MOVES along, and with it come dribs and drabs about county competitors doing nice things on the road. A sampling: ACROBATICS: Ellicott City's Kaitlyn Hilton, 15, who is entering her junior year at Mount Hebron High School, and her two acro teammates were named to the U.S. national elite women's acrobatic team last week. If you can't picture acrobatics as a sport, you'd recognize many of the moves from circus performers or high-level cheerleading. Hilton, who has been into acrobatics since she was 9, performs as the limber, agile top athlete in the acrobatic trio out of Emilia Acrobatics and Gymnastics in Columbia.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
If most of us consider it an accomplishment to walk and chew gum at the same time, the Peking Acrobats are way beyond the human norm when it comes to physical dexterity. They'll demonstrate their extreme feats when appearing at a Columbia Festival of the Arts event on Saturday, June 21 at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake. These jugglers, tumblers, cyclists, gymnasts and contortionists do things so difficult that you wonder how in the world they're able to do some of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 13, 2003
A SIDE FROM the software bundled with Micrsosoft Windows, the most ubiquitous program on computers today may be one you barely notice because it does its job so well. It's called Adobe Acrobat Reader. Its job is to display and print documents with the exact typefaces, graphics, photos and layout its creator intended, no matter what kind of computer or printer you're using. If you've used a PC for any length of time, you've probably viewed one of these documents - a user manual, brochure, catalog, form or report - either with Acrobat Reader or with an Acrobat plug-in for your Web browser.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | October 27, 2005
The Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats make it look so easy. The feats of daring and balance, the acrobatics and martial arts displays, it all seems effortless. A bit painful perhaps, but effortless. Ooh and aah at the acrobats' performance at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis tomorrow. The company, which performs under the direction of the Hai Family, a legendary Chinese acrobatic dynasty, will don colorful costumes and perform seemingly impossible feats, including gravity-defying stunts, amazing examples of strength and more, all with a dose of humor.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 7, 1996
The 30th season in the Shriver Hall Concert Series ended Sunday evening with a concert by the chamber music group Tashi. All the members -- clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, violinists Ida Kavafian and Theodore Arm, violist Steven Tenenbom and cellist Fred Sherry -- are distinguished musicians. But it is Stoltzman who is the brightest star in the constellation of Tashi (the word is Tibetan for "good fortune"), and the audience must have considered itself fortunate that every piece on the program featured him.Stoltzman was at his acrobatic and expressive best -- at least on the printed part of the program -- in Messiaen's "Intermede" (from "Quartet for the End of Time")
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
Daniel Heligoin and Montaine Mallet are a couple who dance closer than most others would dare. They go wingtip to wingtip in the air, in his and her stunt aircraft, while loudspeakers blare a waltz from the ground.As crowds at the Upper Chesapeake Air Show watched yesterday from the Martin State Airport, the couple flew in tandem, climbing and diving with their wings almost touching. When they parted, each did mirror image loop-the-loops, then came out of their respective circles flying low and straight at each other.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | January 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Aiming to "wow" millions of computer users, Microsoft Corp. launched its Vista operating system for consumers yesterday with a series of flashy Manhattan events and midnight sales at stores around the world. Two months after arriving for business customers, the first major Windows upgrade in more than five years promises consumers a slicker 3-D look, improved security and search tools, and a host of multimedia and entertainment features. While promoted by Microsoft executives as an enormous step forward, many reviewers have been more reserved, calling Vista better than the current XP system and full of subtle improvements, but not a revolutionary advance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tori Campion | June 13, 2002
Want to see an acrobat balance one-handed atop a stack of chairs? How about flying tumblers hurling themselves through the air? Yes, you do? Then head to Pennsylvania to see the Chinese Golden Dragon Acrobats. The troupe will be at Longwood Gardens, near Kennett Square, on Saturday. (Rain date is Sunday.) The acrobats, who have performed in more than 65 countries, will begin their show at 7 p.m. in the 1,500-seat Open Air Theatre. Wearing traditional and colorful costumes, they will incorporate balancing, juggling, dancing, contortionism, comedy and magical elements into the performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
The chances of Los - a Baltimore rapper once signed to and quietly dropped from Diddy's Bad Boy Records - being named one of XXL's 2012 Freshmen aren't good. Like most of the hip-hop-only magazines on stands, XXL's clout in rap-circles has diminished greatly over the years. Yet somehow, its annual issue of up-and-comers generates heated debates online, and thus, we still care when Baltimore rappers are included. (Congrats, also, to Mullyman, the only other Baltimore MC included on the ballot.)
TRAVEL
By Hannah Moulden, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Fairfax, Va. Direct from Beijing The National Acrobats of the People's Republic of China, one of the largest acrobatic and circus acts in the world, are making a stop at George Mason University's Center for the Arts this weekend as part of their North American tour. The company is known for displaying astounding flexibility and agility by using a variety of household objects, such as tables, ladders and plates. Sure, they want to entertain, but the acrobats also perform to honor the ancient Chinese tradition that combined deep cultural roots and dramatic folk art. The performance is in the concert hall at George Mason's Center for the Arts at 8 p.m. Friday . Tickets are $24-$48.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
A University of Maryland commission concluded that the school cannot adequately support 27 teams and recommended eliminating eight of them to create "a leaner, stronger athletic program. " The teams, which compete in six different sports, are: men's tennis, men's track and field (indoor, outdoor and cross country), men's swimming and diving, women's swimming and diving, women's water polo and women's acrobatics and tumbling, formerly called "competitive cheer. " The 17-member commission suggested Maryland has had to spread itself thin with so many teams -- five more than the average for the Atlantic Coast Conference's public universities.
EXPLORE
By Tony Glaros | September 21, 2011
Quick, how many members make up the congressional debt-reduction committee? Why did (fill in the blank) flame-out in his run for president? Where was the epicenter of the Great Earthquake of '11, which cracked nerves and the Washington Monument? As the fog of time continues to roll, eventually, we may not be able to instantly retrieve the answers. But if you dare play trivia in one of the growing number of local taverns that offer it, you had better bring your A-game. Because this is mental acrobatics at its best.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
The movies are the movies, but what the Shaolin Warriors do up there on the stage is real. And when it comes to watching the impossible - like when a guy is balanced oh-so-precariously on the tips of a bunch of swords, or when men leap unbelievably high and seem to hover in the air - real makes all the difference. "It's seems almost other-worldly," says Kendra Whitlock Ingram, vice president and general manager of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, who was key in booking the Chinese martial-arts experts into the Meyerhoff for Sunday afternoon's scheduled performance.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | August 26, 2009
He hit the first Orioles home run in Camden Yards history in 1992, but that poke is long forgotten. What Baltimore fondly recalls of Mike Devereaux is his game-winning homer in the summer of 1989 during the Orioles' improbable push for the American League East pennant. By the All-Star break, those Birds seemed a team of destiny, a ragtag bunch that could do no wrong. Devereaux proved that. On July 15, in a game fixed in the minds of Orioles fans, the rookie slammed a walk-off two-run homer that curled around the left-field foul pole at Memorial Stadium and gave the home team an 11-9 comeback victory over the California Angels.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
If most of us consider it an accomplishment to walk and chew gum at the same time, the Peking Acrobats are way beyond the human norm when it comes to physical dexterity. They'll demonstrate their extreme feats when appearing at a Columbia Festival of the Arts event on Saturday, June 21 at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake. These jugglers, tumblers, cyclists, gymnasts and contortionists do things so difficult that you wonder how in the world they're able to do some of them.
EXPLORE
By Tony Glaros | September 21, 2011
Quick, how many members make up the congressional debt-reduction committee? Why did (fill in the blank) flame-out in his run for president? Where was the epicenter of the Great Earthquake of '11, which cracked nerves and the Washington Monument? As the fog of time continues to roll, eventually, we may not be able to instantly retrieve the answers. But if you dare play trivia in one of the growing number of local taverns that offer it, you had better bring your A-game. Because this is mental acrobatics at its best.
NEWS
August 14, 2008
Much has been written about the image-conscious nature of the Chinese and how hosting the Olympics represents a coming-out party for a country that has often kept the West at an arm's distance. But if there's one theme that has emerged from the first week of athletic competition, it's the host nation's unabashed willingness to manipulate reality. While the Chinese women's gymnastic team performed impressively Tuesday night and won a gold medal over the U.S. and Russia, it strains credulity to suggest that all its athletes are at least 16 years old, as required by Olympic rules.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | January 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Aiming to "wow" millions of computer users, Microsoft Corp. launched its Vista operating system for consumers yesterday with a series of flashy Manhattan events and midnight sales at stores around the world. Two months after arriving for business customers, the first major Windows upgrade in more than five years promises consumers a slicker 3-D look, improved security and search tools, and a host of multimedia and entertainment features. While promoted by Microsoft executives as an enormous step forward, many reviewers have been more reserved, calling Vista better than the current XP system and full of subtle improvements, but not a revolutionary advance.
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