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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
- Judas 760 knew just where to swim last fall after federal trappers set him free: back to his home in the marshes of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, where other nutria lived. But true to his name, Judas betrayed members of his colony by providing a virtual road map through dense cattails and inky inlets via a tiny GPS unit on his back. Trappers followed and, in a scene played out with other Judases, exterminated a handful of the destructive rodents that have been responsible for denuding thousands of acres on the Eastern Shore.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Prime pieces of farmland like this one on the auction block in northern Baltimore County are few and far between. Ideally situated among the rolling hills of Maryland's horse country, 4101 Butler Road in Glyndon is a 189-acre, horseshoe-shaped estate adjacent to Sagamore Farm, the well-known thoroughbred horse breeding center. A completely renovated, 304-year-old farmhouse, with three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled on the property. The current owners farm out portions of the land for soybean and hay. There is also a one-bedroom cottage on a 1-plus-acre building site.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Ibbotson Associates, a Chicago-based investment consulting firm, and staff reports. Pub Date: 5/19/96CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 19, 1996
When Howard County farmland began changing hands like Monopoly properties in the 1960s, the ensuing development of the planned new town of Columbia fattened the wallets of speculators, the Rouse Co. and its partners.But the farmers who made that boom possible sold their land for an average $1,490 an acre -- triple the going rate at the time, though much lower than the $240,000 to $400,000 an acre that such choice land is worth today.As the planned community takes stock of itself in the wake of visionary founder James W. Rouse's death last month, those early-1960s land deals loom large in the story of Columbia's creation.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
During a Howard County Zoning Board hearing last night on rezoning proposals that dealt with commercial parcels exceeding 100 acres, it was a 14-acre parcel that dominated discussion.About 20 of the people who showed up at the hearing on the proposed comprehensive rezoning for the east county registered their concern about the requested rezoning to allow denser residential development on the 14-acre parcel. The land is outside the Columbia Association's jurisdiction, so is not subject to the association's fees.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1995
White Acre Road in Columbia's Oakland Mills village has a school crossing guard at each end. For Talbott Springs Elementary School students, the danger lies in the quarter-mile in between.Community leaders say the two crossing guards -- one at Thunder Hill Road, the other at Stevens Forest Road -- are not enough to provide safety for students who often cross between the two designated crossing zones, including at White Acre and Basket Ring roads.This intersection is particularly dangerous because White Acre curves as it rises over a small hill, limiting the visibility of crossing students to motorists.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 12, 2001
With wildfires in Allegany and Harford counties under control, firefighters were battling yesterday to contain a separate blaze that consumed more than 400 acres in Washington County. The wildfire was burning about three miles northeast of Clear Spring, in the Indian Springs Wildlife Management Area, a spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources said. The blaze has not caused any injuries or property damage and was 70 percent contained by sundown yesterday, said DNR spokesman Charles F. Porcari.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
Despite persistent water shortages and pressure to control growth, the Mount Airy Town Council has approved the annexation of a 152-acre farm where a developer plans to build 275 homes, stirring opposition among residents. CBI Development Group, which owns the farmland, is pursuing a plan to tap the Patapsco River as a water source and has offered to cover the $7 million capital costs of river water intake, a pipeline and a treatment plant. Its proposal is subject to approval from the Maryland Department of the Environment.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 29, 1992
It's prime residential land at Charles Street and Bellona Avenue in Towson. But the 30-acre parcel, which was to be part of a luxury town house development known as the Cloisters at Charles, is scheduled to go on the auction block Feb. 14.Signet Bank began foreclosure proceedings on the property Nov.22 after the developer, Faust Homes Inc., defaulted on a $4 million loan secured by the land.In early September, Faust lost another 10-acre parcel in the development when it defaulted on an $8 million loan from Loyola Federal Savings and Loan.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1991
Howard County is considering expanding the Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville by buying 380 acres of adjacent land.John J. O'Hara, chief of the county's Environmental Services Bureau, said the county will hire a consultant to evaluate the properties next to the landfill, a 590-acre site with a 200-acre fill area off Interstate 70, Marriottsville Road and Route 99.He said the county is eyeing the 200-acre Percon Inc. and Doll family properties west of...
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
In a clearing off of a wooded lane in Stevenson is a white stucco, Tuscan-style villa with ornate cast-iron window boxes spilling summer vines, looking like the subject of an impressionist painting. Inside, beyond the driveway and the arched, two-story center bay, the Iliev family - Martin and Jessica, their 3-year old son, Max, and a pair of toy poodles, Sophie and Tiger - welcome visitors to their newly built home. In a large, open kitchen dominated by a center island that's topped with a 9-by-6-foot slab of white quartz, the Ilievs recalled purchasing the 4-acre parcel of land.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A Dundalk man has been charged with stealing and scrapping the historic wrought-iron gates at Battle Acre Monument Park that were reported missing in June, Baltimore County Police said. Detectives have charged George Elias Sotirakis, 34, in the theft, after detectives said he was spotted on surveillance video, and identified through information from local scrap yards. As for the gates, "unfortunately the gates are gone forever," police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter said. The 100-year-old spiked gates had long adorned the park's North Point Road entrance, and were placed during a previous improvements to the park in 1914.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
With more than 2½ acres in Carroll County, Scott and Charlene Uhl faced the challenge of creating intimate gardens in an expansive space. But Charlene Uhl, the budget director at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Scott Uhl, a retired state health department official who now spends time on investments, came up with a solution. Drawing inspiration from Winterthur, Longwood Gardens and Colonial Virginia plantations, they created a formal garden next to the house and added informal plantings of trees, shrubs and perennials away from the house.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Continuing the Obama administration's effort to launch a U.S. offshore wind energy industry, federal officials announced Wednesday that they will auction off the rights next month to build huge turbines off Maryland's coast. The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management said it would take bids Aug. 19 to lease nearly 80,000 acres of Atlantic Ocean about 12 miles off Ocean City for up to two wind projects. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell called the move to lease turbine sites off Maryland "another milestone as we strengthen our nation's foothold in the new energy frontier.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Wrought-iron gates erected to preserve Battle Acre Monument Park, one of Dundalk's War of 1812 sites, have been stolen, police said, even as they were being restored in time for September's celebration of the war's bicentennial. Baltimore County police said the spiked gates on North Point Road that adorned the long-neglected park, wedged between shopping centers and brick rowhouses, were reported missing by a volunteer on Monday. "I'm a little upset about it. They are trying to get this park ready for the big celebration in September.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
At the front entrance of the house at 11743 Springhaven Court is a stone wall with the word "Haleakala" on it, which in Hawaiian means "house of the sun. " The owner of the house in Ellicott City has ties to Hawaii, according to Keller Williams agent Bob Lucido, who has listed the property for a June 21 auction. Lucido calls the Craftsman-style home "a truly one-of-a-kind masterpiece," built in 2009 by architect William Douglas Beims. A gated entrance leads to the house located on more than 7 acres in Ellicott City's Farside Community," Beims said.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
The Westminster Common Council has voted to annex an 8-acre site on Chase Street north of King Park. The parcel, known as the Arnold property, could become the site of a housing development. At a meeting last month, Hampstead-based Robin Ford Building & Remodeling Inc. expressed interest in building 15 custom-designed homes on the property. The company has not filed plans. Several residents in the neighborhood bounded by Chase and Anchor streets expressed concern over a potential increase in traffic and garbage.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Sitting on a crest overlooking the Gunpowder Falls in northern Baltimore County, 1337 Blue Mount Road in Monkton is a contemporary beauty constructed of cedar. "There's both a cleared area and woods sitting on 27 acres of land," said listing agent Lynn Plack with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. "In the winter, you can see the river sparkling through the trees. " Within almost 8,000 square feet of living space, the home - with an understated, contemporary barn feel perfect for its country setting - has two levels with seven bedrooms, five bathrooms and a powder room.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 1, 2014
A record expansion of Maryland's "wildlands" passed the General Assembly Tuesday, as the House of Delegates gave final approval to an O'Malley administration priority to designate nealry 22,000 acres of sensitive state-owned lands as legally protected wilderness areas. The measure, previously passed by the Senate, creates nine new wildlands and expands 14 existing ones in nine counties across the state.  The largest tracts are in rural western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore. But there's even one in the heavily developed Baltimore area - an addition to Soldiers Delight, an ecologically rich swath of rocky soil and grassy savanna in Owings Mills that naturalists say is the largest ecosystem of its type on the East Coast.
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