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By Michael Dresser | March 19, 2003
2002 Allan Scott Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough ($10). This bright, fresh white wine is more toned down than some of the more radically herbal New Zealand sauvignon blancs. (I like them, but they're definitely an acquired taste.) That doesn't mean it sacrifices character. It's herbal enough, and it offers a deliciously fresh, sweet pea flavor and generous fruit. This wine would be well-matched with white-fleshed fish or shellfish, and its bargain price ensures it will have broad appeal.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 10, 2009
Nobody asked me, but I'm pretty sure I saw raccoon for sale at Faidley's in Lexington Market the other day. I checked back with Bill Devine, the owner of the famous seafood stand, and he verified it: Raccoons are $19.98 each, and the marsh rabbit - muskrat - is selling for $7 each. It's the season for such victuals, and Devine still has customers for it, though not as many as he used to. "People who grew up eatin' it on the Eastern Shore," he says, describing the market for raccoon. "Or people who grew up in the Carolinas or Virginia."
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- CBS has a delicious bit of recycling in store for viewers starting tonight, as well as a new show that even its producer, Rob Reiner, calls "an acquired taste."If you are a fan of Leslie Nielsen and "Naked Gun," don't miss the return of "Police Squad!" at 8 tonight (and subsequent Wednesdays) on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)."Police Squad!" is the 1982 ABC-TV spoof of cop shows that inspired the phenomenally successful "Naked Gun" movies.The TV series was canceled after only six episodes.
NEWS
By Gail Rosenblum and Gail Rosenblum,[McClatchy-Tribune] | December 3, 2006
Five years after marrying into the Kizilos band of brothers (Peter, Paul and Mark), Rina Kizilos received the gift she'd long been waiting for: sister-in-law Nancy, who married Peter in 1995. "I liked her right away," said Rina, 38, who has been married to Paul for 16 years. "Here was a woman I could be close to." The two sisters-in-law were equally delighted when Melissa married Mark seven years ago. With seven children ages 10 and younger among them, the three women share parenting advice and recipes, take walks and throw birthday parties, and find time for girls' nights out. "I have said many times, they are like the sisters I never had," said Melissa, 38. "I trust and rely on them.
NEWS
By Ewart Rouse and Ewart Rouse,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Standing on the edge of his expansive garden, Umberto Bifulco bent over, curled his long fingers around a cluster of broad-leaved, deep-rooted dandelions, and pulled. "Look at it," he said excitedly, holding up the vegetable. "Look how beautiful it is. I want you to taste it. I'm going to eat it, too. Don't be afraid." Bifulco sliced off the roots with a pocketknife, brushed off the dirt, handed over a stalk, and bit into another. "Now, isn't that good?" Bifulco prompted.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 16, 2006
Aboard The Jil Carrie-- --In baseball and fishing, opening day is an acquired taste. While there are those who cite crowds and rank amateurs as reasons to stay away, there are thousands more who gladly put up with the little annoyances to kick off the season in style. In cities, they fill ballparks. On the Chesapeake Bay, they fill the boats that fill the water from Susquehanna Flats south to the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Calvert County and beyond. At 5 a.m. yesterday, I joined a group of men who, in good-natured fun, are called "The Legends."
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2003
A year ago, Joe Falcone didn't know how he was going to find enough shelf space for all the new "malternative" beverages that were flooding the market. This year, Falcone has solved the problem. Falcone, beer manager at Wells Discount Liquors on York Road, finally told his boss, "Enough's enough." Instead of granting valuable space to every new flavor and brand of the malt-based sweetened beverages competing for consumers in their 20s, he's decided to stick with a few that have proven themselves to be steady sellers, like Smirnoff Ice or Mike's Hard Lemonade.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1993
Judging from "Catskills on Broadway," the four-member comedy revue now at the Lyric Opera House, it seems safe to say you can take the comic out of the Catskills, but you can't take the Catskills out of the comic.Food is a major activity at the hotels in the Catskills, explains Mal Z. Lawrence, the comic who comes on last and earns some of the biggest laughs. "People eat so much food up there, they have developed a new disease -- Anorexia Ponderosa."Food is an ideal metaphor to describe the appeal of this show, which appears to be something of an acquired taste -- like gefilte fish.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
Scirocco Mediterranean Grill -- soon to be Michelangelo -- is not too shabby for a place that used to be a pizza joint next to a farm supply store on Riva Road. Indeed, it's one of Annapolis' finer restaurants.The meats are superbly grilled and the desserts sinful. Only the salads are unremarkable. Oh, and the sticky black rice, which we'll get to shortly.From the outside, Scirocco looks like the Parthenon. Inside, it has a Southern Spain or North Africa feel with faux marble walls, busts and fat candles on spiraling, wrought-iron candlesticks.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
When they break out the broccoli rape in the kitchen at Della Notte in Little Italy, they don't put up a "Bitter - Handle With Care" sign, but they might. Caution is recommended with such things as broccoli rape and arugula and fenugreek and a range of stuff falling into a "bitter family" of foods and beverages. It's probably safe to consider this an acquired taste - the sting on the tongue, the metallic slick that seems to linger on the roof of the mouth long after other tastes fade. "I find people either like it or they don't," says Della Notte executive chef John Rybock, referring to broccoli rape or rabe or rapini, a green and leafy relative of the cabbage and turnip known for its bite.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 16, 2006
Aboard The Jil Carrie-- --In baseball and fishing, opening day is an acquired taste. While there are those who cite crowds and rank amateurs as reasons to stay away, there are thousands more who gladly put up with the little annoyances to kick off the season in style. In cities, they fill ballparks. On the Chesapeake Bay, they fill the boats that fill the water from Susquehanna Flats south to the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Calvert County and beyond. At 5 a.m. yesterday, I joined a group of men who, in good-natured fun, are called "The Legends."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 12, 2005
I'm a summer baby. I was born in July during a week in 1977 when the temperature was more than a hundred degrees every day. (Mama won't let me forget how miserable she was carrying me while trying to beat that Arkansas heat.) Summer months are usually the backdrop to some of my fondest childhood memories: sitting under a big shade tree with my country cousins, eating ribs and sipping red Kool-Aid (not grape, not lemon, but any flavor that turned the sugar water a bright shade of crimson)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
When they break out the broccoli rape in the kitchen at Della Notte in Little Italy, they don't put up a "Bitter - Handle With Care" sign, but they might. Caution is recommended with such things as broccoli rape and arugula and fenugreek and a range of stuff falling into a "bitter family" of foods and beverages. It's probably safe to consider this an acquired taste - the sting on the tongue, the metallic slick that seems to linger on the roof of the mouth long after other tastes fade. "I find people either like it or they don't," says Della Notte executive chef John Rybock, referring to broccoli rape or rabe or rapini, a green and leafy relative of the cabbage and turnip known for its bite.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
Soft-shell crabs are Rick Baxter's livelihood. His family-owned company, Baxter Soft-shell Crabs, on the Eastern Shore, supplies the seasonal delicacy to restaurants in Maryland, Washington and Virginia. It follows that soft-shell crabs would be a family staple. But even in the Baxter home, soft-shell crabs were an acquired taste. "What my wife did the first time to get our kids to eat them, she cut them up in small pieces, dipped them in tempura mix. She fried them and put a plateful on the table," says Baxter, whose children are 10, 11 and 13. "In 10 minutes, they were dipping them in ketchup and eating them like french fries," he says.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2003
A year ago, Joe Falcone didn't know how he was going to find enough shelf space for all the new "malternative" beverages that were flooding the market. This year, Falcone has solved the problem. Falcone, beer manager at Wells Discount Liquors on York Road, finally told his boss, "Enough's enough." Instead of granting valuable space to every new flavor and brand of the malt-based sweetened beverages competing for consumers in their 20s, he's decided to stick with a few that have proven themselves to be steady sellers, like Smirnoff Ice or Mike's Hard Lemonade.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 19, 2003
2002 Allan Scott Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough ($10). This bright, fresh white wine is more toned down than some of the more radically herbal New Zealand sauvignon blancs. (I like them, but they're definitely an acquired taste.) That doesn't mean it sacrifices character. It's herbal enough, and it offers a deliciously fresh, sweet pea flavor and generous fruit. This wine would be well-matched with white-fleshed fish or shellfish, and its bargain price ensures it will have broad appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 12, 2005
I'm a summer baby. I was born in July during a week in 1977 when the temperature was more than a hundred degrees every day. (Mama won't let me forget how miserable she was carrying me while trying to beat that Arkansas heat.) Summer months are usually the backdrop to some of my fondest childhood memories: sitting under a big shade tree with my country cousins, eating ribs and sipping red Kool-Aid (not grape, not lemon, but any flavor that turned the sugar water a bright shade of crimson)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
Turner Classic Movies is offering definitive proof this summer that silents are golden.Not by showing silent movies, which have become something of an acquired taste (although a taste certainly worth acquiring) and demand far more attention than modern audiences are used to giving.Rather, TCM is re-releasing 1979's 13-part series about silent movies that's not only a wonderful primer on silents, but also one of the best documentaries ever."Hollywood: A Celebration of the American Silent Film" lovingly chronicles an art form that was once the most popular entertainment on the planet.
NEWS
By Ewart Rouse and Ewart Rouse,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Standing on the edge of his expansive garden, Umberto Bifulco bent over, curled his long fingers around a cluster of broad-leaved, deep-rooted dandelions, and pulled. "Look at it," he said excitedly, holding up the vegetable. "Look how beautiful it is. I want you to taste it. I'm going to eat it, too. Don't be afraid." Bifulco sliced off the roots with a pocketknife, brushed off the dirt, handed over a stalk, and bit into another. "Now, isn't that good?" Bifulco prompted.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
Scirocco Mediterranean Grill -- soon to be Michelangelo -- is not too shabby for a place that used to be a pizza joint next to a farm supply store on Riva Road. Indeed, it's one of Annapolis' finer restaurants.The meats are superbly grilled and the desserts sinful. Only the salads are unremarkable. Oh, and the sticky black rice, which we'll get to shortly.From the outside, Scirocco looks like the Parthenon. Inside, it has a Southern Spain or North Africa feel with faux marble walls, busts and fat candles on spiraling, wrought-iron candlesticks.
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