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By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
Almost two decades ago, Tashima Crudup left her grandmother's home and entered the city's foster care system, where she learned firsthand what makes a good mother. As she shuffled from family to family beginning at age 8, Crudup encountered some attentive and loving foster parents, while others were unsupportive and constraining. "I always wanted to be a foster parent," said the 26-year-old mother of five. In July, Crudup — a practicing Muslim — contacted Contemporary Family Services, a private company authorized by the state to place foster children with families.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has filed a federal employment discrimination complaint against a Maryland hair salon on behalf of an employee who says he was fired for being HIV-positive. Representatives for Ratner Cos., which owns the Hair Cuttery in Greenbelt, said in a statement he was fired for "repeated inappropriate behavior," including verbally abusing co-workers in front of clients. A company document outlining his HIV status as the cause for his termination — which the ACLU included in the complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — "inaccurately described the reason for his dismissal," they said.
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NEWS
June 2, 2010
Baltimore is so poor that it considers closing fire houses and firing firefighters and the ACLU is pushing for school construction in the billions ("ACLU criticizes lack of school construction funding in city," June 2). Classic case of stupidity par excellence. F.P. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union and some advocacy groups urged the City Council on Thursday to scrap a tough youth curfew bill and instead implement a plan that calls for more social programs for young people. But Councilman Brandon Scott, lead sponsor of the curfew bill, said the critics misunderstand the legislation and waited too long to get involved. "If they were so concerned about this, why haven't they made these suggestions before?" he asked. Scott said he expects the council to give final approval to the bill Monday.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
News flash for Robert Ehrlich: The undeserved pot shot at the ACLU in your recent op-ed speculating on life if Mitt Romney had won the presidency is, indeed, based on fantasy and delusion ("What might have been: Life under President Romney" Jan. 27). As a Ravens fan, I must set the record straight. Far from wishing to keep Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis from invoking God during post-game interviews, the ACLU would defend his right to pray any time during the game he wants. The First Amendment protects his right to pray.
NEWS
March 12, 2010
- The American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi is suing to force a school district to host a prom it canceled after a lesbian student asked to bring her girlfriend and wear a tuxedo. The lawsuit was filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Oxford on behalf of 18-year-old Constance McMillen. The Itawamba County School District said it wouldn't host the April 2 prom at Itawamba Agricultural High School after the ACLU demanded McMillen be allowed to escort her girlfriend. District officials said they hoped private citizens would sponsor a prom instead.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department on behalf of a Howard County man who says his camera was confiscated at the Preakness last year after he recorded officers arresting a woman. The ACLU had notified the department on Aug. 3 of its intent to sue but said a lawsuit could be avoided if police worked to develop clearer policies and acknowledged that the man should have been able to record the incident. The group said the Police Department did not respond.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
It was very interesting to hear today that Casa de Maryland and the ACLU have hired a big name lawyer, Joseph Sandler, to help them contest what is already uncontestable, and that is over 100,000 signatures validated by the state board of elections for the Dream Act referendum bill, which is currently slated for statewide vote in 2012. ("In-state tuition opponents have the signatures for referendum" July 8.) Isn't it worth noting that when a group wants something so badly, that they are willing to go to any lengths to protect their position?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Out of more than 120,000 documented citizen stops by Baltimore Police last year, only 494 resulted in a search and just nine guns were recovered, according to data the agency released to the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland. The data offers a snapshot of police enforcement on the city streets, though the ACLU said it raises more questions than it answers and on Tuesday called on the department to keep better track of how much officers conduct "stop and frisks. " "Everything about the BPD's response - and lack thereof - to the ACLU's request for public records demonstrates that the BPD has completely failed to supervise how officers deploy 'stop-and-frisk- tactics against Baltimore residents, despite complaints about abuse of the tactic stretching back over a decade," the ACLU said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union released an online "toolkit" on Wednesday outlining ways local advocates can improve conditions for LGBT prisoners across the country. It also provides information on how LGBT prisoners can protect themselves. In its announcement, the ACLU said lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender inmates in the United States face increased levels of sexual harassment, sexual assault and physical isolation. Transgender people often cannot live in spaces for those of their identified gender, and are forced to strip so guards can check their genitals.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Drivers suspected of causing serious accidents in Maryland while distracted by a cellphone would be required to give police certain information from that phone under a pair of bills currently filed in Annapolis. The bills also would make distracted driving resulting in a death or serious injury a misdemeanor in Maryland, punishable by up to 3 years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000. Advocates say the legislation would save lives by deterring distracted driving in an age when cellphone use is increasingly being linked to deadly car accidents, and when many in Maryland support harsher penalties for it. Civil liberty advocates have raised concerns about the proposed law's constitutionality.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union released an online "toolkit" on Wednesday outlining ways local advocates can improve conditions for LGBT prisoners across the country. It also provides information on how LGBT prisoners can protect themselves. In its announcement, the ACLU said lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender inmates in the United States face increased levels of sexual harassment, sexual assault and physical isolation. Transgender people often cannot live in spaces for those of their identified gender, and are forced to strip so guards can check their genitals.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Attorneys for Anne Arundel County and former County Executive John R. Leopold urged a judge Monday to throw out a lawsuit claiming the former executive improperly ordered police to compile "dossiers" on political rivals. Leopold, a Republican, resigned as county executive in February 2013 after he was found guilty of two counts of misconduct in office. The convictions were based on allegations that he forced police officers on his protective detail to erect campaign signs, collect campaign donations and compile the dossiers, and also required officers and other employees to drain his catheter bag. He is appealing those convictions.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
With Baltimore police taking (and accepting) flak recently for failing to track and analyze its officers' use of the controversial stop-and-frisk tactic, another agency has the data and isn't doing much with it, either. State law requires police agencies to forward a copy of every stop-and-frisk report to the Maryland State Police, which receives them at irregular intervals and does not sort them or enter them into a database. The agency keeps the reports for one year before tossing them, said spokeswoman Elena Wendell-Russo.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said Wednesday he is in "strong agreement" with concerns raised by the ACLU over how his agency tracks its officers' interactions with citizens. The civil liberties group released department data that showed officers had made 123,000 citizen stops last year, resulting in 494 searches and yielding nine guns and one knife. Police could not provide any audits or memos regarding oversight of "stop and frisk" searches, and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland said the data was so implausible that it "suggests a lack of supervision and accountability.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Out of more than 120,000 documented citizen stops by Baltimore Police last year, only 494 resulted in a search and just nine guns were recovered, according to data the agency released to the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland. The data offers a snapshot of police enforcement on the city streets, though the ACLU said it raises more questions than it answers and on Tuesday called on the department to keep better track of how much officers conduct "stop and frisks. " "Everything about the BPD's response - and lack thereof - to the ACLU's request for public records demonstrates that the BPD has completely failed to supervise how officers deploy 'stop-and-frisk- tactics against Baltimore residents, despite complaints about abuse of the tactic stretching back over a decade," the ACLU said in a statement.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 2, 2013
The ACLU of Maryland is calling for legislators to halt funding to religious and private schools, saying that taxpayer money should be put toward the state's funding obligation to public schools. In a release, the advocacy organization called a taxpayer subsidy of $500,000 slated to go to private schools next year "unfair. " The funding, included in the state's supplementary budget, was scheduled to be reviewed in the House Appropriations Committee on Tuesday.  “Taxpayer funding should not be used for textbooks and technology at private and religious schools, especially when the state's fiscal climate that is just beginning to recover,” Sara Love, public policy director for the ACLU of Maryland, said in a statement.  The organization went on to say: "Our public funds should be dedicated to public schools.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Law enforcement in Maryland is "unwittingly" being turned into a tool of federal immigration authorities by agreeing to hold people wanted by the Department of Homeland Security, the ACLU said Tuesday. A report published by the American Civil Liberties Union examined the ways in which Maryland police and jails comply with "immigration detainers" issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to ask local authorities to hold people for up to 48 hours after they would otherwise be released.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore police say they stopped residents 123,000 times last year but found only nine handguns - a figure civil rights advocates say is so implausible that it raises questions about whether the agency is actually monitoring the conduct of officers on the streets. "I think what's become apparent is that the department can make no credible assertion at this point about how they are using stop and frisk or what it accomplishes," said Sonia Kumar, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Law enforcement in Maryland is "unwittingly" being turned into a tool of federal immigration authorities by agreeing to hold people wanted by the Department of Homeland Security, the ACLU said Tuesday. A report published by the American Civil Liberties Union examined the ways in which Maryland police and jails comply with "immigration detainers" issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to ask local authorities to hold people for up to 48 hours after they would otherwise be released.
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