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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 26, 1993
Both the sculptures of Karen Acker and the paintings of Emilio Cruz are based on the human figure and use somewhat unusual combinations of materials, and that's only the beginning of what they have in common.Cruz begins with long, narrow white birch panels which he covers with a layer of gesso. On this he then draws the human figure in charcoal and covers it with a layer of beeswax, into which he cuts deep lines to create additional drawing. Finally he adds paint.Acker combines porcelain, steel and sometimes wood into sculptures which also have reference to the human body.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A Morgan State defense that finished 2013 ranked eighth in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference in average yards allowed (391.8) and ninth in average points surrendered (30.6) could be weaker after the departure of five starters. But the Bears return three of four linebackers who earned a majority of starts last season, and that group was cited by rookie head coach Lee Hull as being critical to leading the defense. “We're really counting on those guys to be the anchor of our defense,” Hull said Tuesday during the MEAC's weekly conference call.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | July 29, 1992
Karen Acker must be the "(or not)" part of Galerie Francoise's current five-sculptor show, titled "Whimsy (or not);" all the other sculptors could conceivably be thought whimsical, but Acker's work is positively scary.Her surrealist parts of bodies, made of porcelain and perched on spindly legged bases, are like nightmares of what might happen to us, physically and otherwise. Her "Trunk" is just that -- a headless and limbless trunk, wrapped as if in bandages. The mummified piece is a reminder of the endlessness of death, of all kinds of things that can befall us, and of how constricted our lives are, compared to what they might be. Looking at it, one wants to use one's arms and legs and senses more than ever before, because soon enough one won't be able to use them at all.Her "Trap" is a body with holes in it, again suggesting how the body breaks down with time, but also the kinds of "holes" or flaws that are not seen -- of character, for instance.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Acker had a dream season for the No. 6 Raiders, who finished the season 18-2 and 17-0 in Howard County in the regular season. The senior batted .541 in 61 at-bats, contributing 33 hits, 10 doubles, four home runs, two triples and nine stolen bases. He scored 36 runs, struck out only three times and was named Howard County Player of the Year by county coaches. "Brady was a leader on our team, both vocally and by example," Atholton coach Jon Dupski said. "The other players respond to him and the example he sets.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
It was the last Saturday night in a world that was about to be suddenly and irrevocably changed by the agony and death of war. Rose Acker recalls Dec. 6, 1941, as a balmy Saturday night in Hawaii, not untypical weather for that time of the year. She and her husband, James Mandris, an architect, always played bridge with several other couples on Saturday nights at tables set up in the living room of their small white cottage. They resided on Spencer Street in the Makiki neighborhood in the foothills above Honolulu, where they had a clear view of Pearl Harbor, some nine miles away, and the naval vessels that rode at anchor.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2003
SALISBURY - The pro scouts keep coming to watch him, the agents keep calling to entice him, and Kyle Acker keeps reminding himself to take it all in stride. He is happy to be playing tight end for Salisbury University, thrilled to be part of a winning program with great teammates on a campus close to home. But Acker's dream to be an accomplished football player has taken on a dimension that borders on the unreal. The Sea Gulls are a Division III school. They reside at the low end of the NCAA food chain.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | July 7, 2007
A 53-year-old Anne Arundel County man received a 10-year prison sentence in federal court in Virginia yesterday for trying to lure a federal agent posing as a 13-year-old girl into sex. U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema in Alexandria sentenced Willard Temple Acker of Edgewater to the prison term followed by 20 years' supervised release. According to court documents, Acker began an instant-messaging chat Feb. 21 with someone he believed to be a 13-year-old girl from Fairfax, Va. In fact, authorities said, Acker was chatting with an undercover FBI agent.
NEWS
By JUDY REILLY | November 17, 1994
"When I first came here from western New York a couple of years ago and learned that a community worship service was held at the church on Thanksgiving eve," says the Rev. Charles Acker, "I thought, 'You've got to be kidding -- who would come out on the night before Thanksgiving, with so many people out of town, or relatives visiting, and so many preparations to take care of on the night before a major holiday?' "Well, about 250 people, enough to fill his church, St. Paul's United Methodist, at 200 Main St. in New Windsor.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
There's no doubt about it, Harry Letaw Jr. is a class A optimist.In one breath yesterday, the chairman and chief executive of Essex Corp. told shareholders about company losses, a 50 percent drop in sales over the past three years and the fact that the company's major bank was about to fly the coop.In the next breath, he was projecting a three-fold growth in revenues by the end of 1995, accompanied by a 15 percent annual return on stockholders' equity."We have a growth plan," Mr. Letaw told the 30 or so shareholders who attended the company's annual meeting at its corporate headquarters in Columbia.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 4, 1991
Sculptor Karen Acker's shapes of delicate porcelain, with surfaces that look like skin, are put together into compelling works at the School 33 Art Center; they have the perverse fascination of something horrible that you can't takes your eyes off of.A faculty member at Goucher College, Acker showed some of her porcelain and steel sculptures there in the spring. The broken and pierced bodies of those surrealist works were a kind of physical manifestation of fears and neuroses, such as might occur in dreams.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
There was a time when Morgan State middle linebacker Cody Acker was more consumed with his tackles total. Aside from the excitement of taking down a running back or sacking a quarterback, Acker enjoyed seeing the numbers increase next to his name after each game. But with age comes maturity, and the junior now concerns himself more with team-wide success than his personal stats. "I think any football player who is a competitor wants to play at a high level," Acker said. "Before, I wanted to make a lot of tackles.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Brady Acker (Atholton) hit a grand slam in the top of the first inning Wednesday as Maryland won, 5-1, over Arkansas in the Heartland Classic baseball tournament in Norman, Okla. Ryan Selmer (Riverdale Baptist) earned the victory after allowing one run and four hits in seven innings. He struck out three batters and walked three. Andrew Yacyk (North Hagerstown) also had an RBI single in the first inning as Maryland bounced back from a 10-run loss in its first game during the second day of the tournament.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Herbert W. "Bill" Acker, a retired Price Waterhouse Coopers LLD regional managing partner, died Friday of kidney cancer at his Stone House Farm in Churchville. He was 70. Herbert William Acker — who was known as H. William "Bill" Acker — was the son of a Ford-New Holland worker and a postmistress. He was born and raised in Intercourse, Pa., where he graduated from Pequea High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1963 in accounting from Lebanon Valley College, he began his accounting career at Price Waterhouse in New York City.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | July 7, 2007
A 53-year-old Anne Arundel County man received a 10-year prison sentence in federal court in Virginia yesterday for trying to lure a federal agent posing as a 13-year-old girl into sex. U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema in Alexandria sentenced Willard Temple Acker of Edgewater to the prison term followed by 20 years' supervised release. According to court documents, Acker began an instant-messaging chat Feb. 21 with someone he believed to be a 13-year-old girl from Fairfax, Va. In fact, authorities said, Acker was chatting with an undercover FBI agent.
NEWS
September 23, 2006
Ellsworth G. Acker, a retired chemist, died of cancer Sept. 13 at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. The Taylorsville resident was 86. Born in Kokomo, Ind., and raised in Northeast Baltimore's Hamilton section, he was a 1938 graduate of City College. He earned a bachelor's degree in physical science at the University of Maryland. In 1943, Mr. Ellsworth joined the Navy and served as a captain aboard an amphibious craft in the Pacific. After the war, he earned a second bachelor's degree in chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University and became a chemist at W.R. Grace.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 25, 2005
It came as a big surprise to the real estate industry last year that second homes were accounting for more than one-third of annual sales. Before 2005, the National Association of Realtors' survey techniques failed to accurately gauge the size of this market, even though anecdotal evidence had indicated a substantial increase in second-home purchases over the previous decade. Newly accurate or not, the percentages don't tell the whole story: Though baby boomers make up a large part of the second-home market, a growing number of foreign buyers are in it, taking advantage of a weaker dollar.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuelsand Robert Hilson Jr. and Alisa Samuelsand Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | October 8, 1990
Under hazy skies, two stenciled words on the black-and-white sign at the entrance gate to the Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine today brought huge disappointment for local residents and out-of-towners alike."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1994
The Essex Corp., a Columbia-based military contractor that has been hammered by defense cutbacks, announced yesterday it would sell up to $2.5 million worth of stock in an attempt to fund its move into civilian markets.The move was praised yesterday by one of the few stock analysts still paying attention to the company's shares: Brooklyn, N.Y.-based investor Bob Acker, author of The Acker Letter.Mr. Acker, who started recommending Essex stock several years ago when he noticed insiders were buying shares while the stock price was falling, conceded that Essex has been having financial difficulties.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
The year was 1998. Johns Hopkins coach Nancy Funk was one of the hottest names in Division III women's basketball, having guided the Blue Jays to back-to-back NCAA final eight finishes and a combined 49-10 record. A Division I school in the South was interested in luring Funk away from Hopkins and wanted to schedule an interview. Funk said she was content at Hopkins and felt at home at the D-III level. However, she gave in to the urging of friends and associates who insisted she owed it to herself to talk to the school.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
It was the last Saturday night in a world that was about to be suddenly and irrevocably changed by the agony and death of war. Rose Acker recalls Dec. 6, 1941, as a balmy Saturday night in Hawaii, not untypical weather for that time of the year. She and her husband, James Mandris, an architect, always played bridge with several other couples on Saturday nights at tables set up in the living room of their small white cottage. They resided on Spencer Street in the Makiki neighborhood in the foothills above Honolulu, where they had a clear view of Pearl Harbor, some nine miles away, and the naval vessels that rode at anchor.
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