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NEWS
February 16, 2012
Thank you Marta Mossburg for having the courage to state the obvious ("A failure of values, not economics," Feb. 15). The idea that values are a significant factor in personal achievement has been sneered at by the left for over 30 years. As Ms. Mossburg points out, the facts clearly show otherwise. Unfortunately, I don't believe the current administration in Annapolis is capable of addressing the real problems in the achievement gap. That would be too difficult. It's so much easier to throw money at the problem (other people's money, I might add)
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NEWS
Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
University System of Maryland schools have had mixed success in improving the graduation rates of minority and low-income students, according to an annual progress report released this week. Some colleges, including the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, have been able to boost minority and low-income achievement. But at other schools, the gaps between those students and middle-class whites have increased in recent years. "I was shocked to see the numbers," said Frank M. Reid III, a university system regent and pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie | July 9, 2013
Getting children ready to read and do math has usually begun in pre-school, but there's a new idea that perhaps it should start in the womb. Sara Neufeld, a former Baltimore Sun education reporter, has written about one such attempt in Chicago to empower mothers with information to make good decisions about their children's futures. Her story in The Atlantic  looks at attempts to arm young mothers with a host of knowledge and skills that allows them to better nurture and advocate for their children.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Anthony Alston was appointed by Anne Arundel County Public Schools to address achievement gaps among student groups. But the executive director of the system's new Office of Equity and Accelerated Student Achievement is also well aware of gaps that exist between the school system and some Anne Arundel communities. Alston discovered some of those gaps in early June, when then-interim Superintendent Mamie Perkins created the office to monitor achievement and report to the deputy superintendent.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | March 4, 2014
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Anthony G.  Brown pledged Tuesday to adopt a variety of new educational initiatives that take aim at reducing the achievement gap by extending support to struggling families. The new Brown proposals include placing Latino liaisons in schools that have a large Hispanic population, training teachers to better understand students from diverse cultural backgrounds and expanding the school breakfast program. Several items on the list are initiatives that he has unveiled previously, such as expanding pre-kindergarten and building better school facilities for career and technology education.
NEWS
February 13, 2012
For the fourth year in a row, Maryland students have topped the nation in the proportion of high school graduates who successfully passed the rigorous Advanced Placement exams, leaping even further ahead of other top states. Twenty-nine percent of last year's class passed at least one AP test, compared to the national average of 18 percent. Maryland's pass rate is double what it was a decade ago. The results suggest that the state's commitment to investing in education over recent years is paying off in bumper crops of students with the kind of advanced, high-level academic skills the state will need to compete successfully in a 21 s t -century knowledge-based global economy, and that's all to the good.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
The Anne Arundel County branch of the NAACP has asked the County Council to put pressure on the county school system, in hopes of accelerating an agreement to close the achievement gap between white and black students. Jacqueline Allsup, president of the county National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said in testimony before the council Monday that while the school system is "moving in the right direction" progress is coming "way too slowly. " Allsup said the school system should concentrate its efforts on elementary school education.
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | February 22, 2012
Imagine a report that reached the following three conclusions: In Maryland, 35 percent of males passed Advanced Placement exams, but only 8 percent of females passed them; 70 percent of males who took the AP exams could pass them, but only 28 percent of females could; and nationally, an estimated 79 percent of females who could succeed in AP courses were not even being offered them. The outcry over such differences by gender in achievement and access to AP tests would result in a massive public outcry over obvious systemic failures to educate males and females equally.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
Here we go again: Haven't these Move to Opportunity programs destroyed enough neighborhoods ("Closing Baltimore's achievement gap with housing policy," May 30)? It's a crime what the politicians did to Dundalk, Essex and the Patterson Park area, to name just a few. If you are so for this movement of people, move them into your neighborhoods, and those of the judges, lawyers and politicians who approve of this. Stop pushing them on working people. Martin, Fallston
NEWS
May 30, 2011
A recent Abell Foundation study has confirmed what educators have long known: That where a student lives has at least as big an impact on academic achievement as such factors as family income, class size and per pupil spending. In fact, attending a school where most of one's classmates aren't poor is one of the best predictors of school success: Even poor students who attend such schools score better on standardized tests than their peers in schools with high concentrations of poverty.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
On Friday morning, in the auditorium of Loch Raven High School, more than 300 school administrators closed their eyes for 30 seconds. Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance had asked them to think about what could make schools "opportunity rich" for all students. "Those are the types of conversations we're going to have over the course of this year," Dance said in the school system's administrative and supervisory meeting to kick off the school year, which begins Aug. 25. The meeting for administrators and principals focused on equity, opportunity, engagement and relationships in county schools.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
State education officials told us that scores on this year's Maryland School Assessment exams would go down, and that they most certainly did. Schools state-wide embarked last fall on their first full year of instruction tied to the Common Core standards, but the tests this spring were still tied to the old curriculum. The mismatch was such an obvious issue that many, from parents to some candidates for governor, advocated skipping the tests altogether on the grounds that they would be a waste of time and money.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Maryland is already one of the best educated states in the nation, ranking at or near the top when it comes to the percentage of residents with college and post-graduate degrees. But state leaders, looking at an increasingly competitive, knowledge-based global economy, think that's not going to be nearly good enough. About 45 percent of the state's adults have at least an associate's degree now, but state leaders decided in 2009 that it should aim to bump that up to 55 percent by 2025.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | March 4, 2014
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Anthony G.  Brown pledged Tuesday to adopt a variety of new educational initiatives that take aim at reducing the achievement gap by extending support to struggling families. The new Brown proposals include placing Latino liaisons in schools that have a large Hispanic population, training teachers to better understand students from diverse cultural backgrounds and expanding the school breakfast program. Several items on the list are initiatives that he has unveiled previously, such as expanding pre-kindergarten and building better school facilities for career and technology education.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Breaking with his past reluctance to tailor policies to specific racial groups, President Barack Obama on Thursday launched a federal program aimed at improving the economic and educational status of young black and Hispanic men. The initiative, which does not require congressional approval, would direct $200 million in foundation money toward programs intended to close the racial achievement gap in schools and reduce the disproportionate unemployment...
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | February 6, 2014
"Maryland, No. 1 in education!" We've heard that boast ad nauseam over the last five years, every time Education Week releases its Quality Counts rankings. We hear it especially from the state's political establishment, as it takes every chance it can to claim credit for this top ranking in the nation. But what does No. 1 really mean? The actual Education Week report - which this year did not include an overall state ranking - and other data show that all that glitters is not gold when it comes to education in Maryland.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
Baltimore County school board members say they're tired of talking about the wide achievement gap between black and white students. They want to do something to narrow it. "We've moved terribly slowly," said Sanford V. Teplitzky, the senior member of the board. "I'm really tired of reading the same reports we've been reading for years. "We need to set it as a priority and that means placing dollars toward it, placing resources toward it, meaning human and others." What will be done is unclear.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
When Education Week released its latest assessment of state education systems last week, the news for Maryland was once again great. Maryland remained the only state in the nation to receive at least a "B" across all six categories. Maryland was one of only five states to narrow the achievement gap for low income students by more than five percentage points. Maryland was first in Advanced Placement success. These accomplishments resulted in the No. 1 composite state ranking in the nation for the sixth consecutive year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Baltimore County school Superintendent Dallas Dance rolled out Tuesday a $1.4 billion proposed budget for next year that would shave principals' budgets, increase seats for pre-kindergartners and add money for employee raises. The budget, which must be approved by the school board before it goes to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, is a $72.4 million, or 5 percent increase, over this year's. By reducing costs in some areas, Dance would be able to pay for his top priorities, including new programs to close the achievement gap and new technology in schools.
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