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August 1, 2004
Excerpts from Barack Obama's keynote speech to the Democratic National Convention: My parents shared not only an improbable love; they shared an abiding faith in the possibilities of this nation. They would give me an African name, Barack, or "blessed," believing that in a tolerant America your name is no barrier to success. They imagined me going to the best schools in the land, even though they weren't rich, because in a generous America you don't have to be rich to achieve your potential.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
Baltimore-based Advertising.com Inc. laid off 72 of its 287 employees yesterday, about 25 percent of its work force, most of whom worked at its Tide Point headquarters. "Our decision was based on achieving profitability sooner," said Scott Ferber, co-founder and chief executive officer of Advertising.com. "The industry is changing rapidly. We needed a skill set slightly changed from what we needed before." The staff reduction, coupled with a second year of consistent revenue growth and more than $50 million in funding secured in 2000 from strategic partners, will strengthen the company's business position for this year and beyond, company officials said.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 30, 1996
How would you feel if, after years of toil, training and suffering, you had turned yourself into the world's best, only to have the moment tainted by a sense of underachievement?If that happened, you would be in good company, since you'd be joined by Michael Johnson, whose golden moment, a win in the 400-meter run, was tarnished by the weight of NBC's expectations.Before the race, NBC hands from Bob Costas to race callers Tom Hammond and Craig Masback set the table for Johnson's certain demonstration of superiority, with Masback implying that with the Olympic Stadium track yielding world records in other sprints, Johnson would do no less.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
This is Melissa Young's resume:The Western High School graduate entered Morgan State University at age 16. She graduated at age 20 with an electrical engineering degree. By age 22, Ms. Young had her master's degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University. Now all of 23, Ms. Young lives in Los Angeles, where she works as an engineer at Hughes Space and Communications Co.She also won the 1994 Black Engineer of the Year award for "Most Promising Engineer." The award is sponsored by the Council of Engineering Deans of the historically black colleges and universities, US Black Engineer magazine and others.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 2, 2005
Nicolas Cage likes to keep his fans guessing. Take Lord of War, the recently opened action film in which he plays the proudly amoral Yuri Orlov, a second-generation Ukrainian emigre who's decided the surest way to achieve the American dream of wealth and happiness is to sell guns to anyone, be he street thug or insane African dictator. Cage plays Orlov like an old-time snake-oil salesman, all smiles and good manners and warm pats on the back, totally dismissive of his customers' plans for his merchandise.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
At Woodlawn High School, long known for overcrowding and underachievement, Principal C. Anthony Thompson recently gathered some seniors in his office and gushed about how proud he was of their leadership. This was a few days after he had talked about bolstering school pride - "The Woodlawn Way" - and honoring students for good attendance. It might seem odd that the tenor has turned warm and fuzzy at Woodlawn High, which audits by state and Baltimore County educators two years ago described as a dirty place where loud, rude students showed "disrespect for authority" and could barely be controlled in the halls by teachers who displayed "minimal effectiveness."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
It's 8:40 a.m. at Phelps Luck Elementary School in Columbia and 500-plus pupils are trying to talk themselves into greater success. I stand tall! I stand tall! they chant, punctuating each sentence with two claps. I take pride in my work, pride in my school, pride in my family, pride in myself. I will achieve! (clap, clap) I will achieve! (clap, clap) Their principal, John Morningstar, grins above his Dr. Seuss tie. "See?" he asks. "They do this and then they say the Pledge and they're ready to work."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
It's 8:40 a.m. at Phelps Luck Elementary School in Columbia and 500-plus pupils are trying to talk themselves into greater success. I stand tall! I stand tall! they chant, punctuating each sentence with two claps. I take pride in my work, pride in my school, pride in my family, pride in myself. I will achieve! (clap, clap) I will achieve! (clap, clap) Their principal, John Morningstar, grins above his Dr. Seuss tie. "See?" he asks. "They do this and then they say the Pledge and they're ready to work."
NEWS
January 15, 1996
AFTER A DOSE of Newt Gingrich negativism and Bill Clinton minimalism, American voters can write off any chance of meaningful reform this year of the nation's big entitlement programs -- Medicare, Medicaid, farm subsidies, veterans benefits and the biggest enchilada, Social Security. Budget experts have long contended that there can be no permanent cure of Washington's addiction to deficit financing so long as these programs run on automatic pilot, going up each year regardless of the budget situation.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Completing a fully leased office building project these economically distressed days is a remarkable achievement. It is all the more remarkable for a small developer who has never pulled off a project of that magnitude. The fact it was achieved by an African-American developer is simultaneously historic and irrelevant.Otis Warren Jr. had every reason to act like a proud parent at the formal opening of the $38 million City Crescent office development on Howard Street several weeks ago. The market for commercial real estate is bleak; financing for it from banks and other lenders who have been battered by its collapse is scarce indeed.
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