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NEWS
January 19, 2005
DEPUTY DEFENSE Secretary Paul Wolfowitz paid a call on Jakarta over the weekend, and in his wake, U.S. and Indonesian defense officials talked of rising prospects for renewal of military cooperation, limited for more than a decade because of murders and other abuses by Indonesian forces in now independent East Timor. Not so fast. It's hard to disagree with the argument that access to U.S. training would serve as a civilizing influence on the Indonesian army. But that sizable carrot - along with other military aid or sales - ought to be held out only once it's clear that Jakarta will sufficiently rein in its military in the tsunami-battered province of Aceh to allow badly needed foreign relief efforts to proceed effectively.
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NEWS
August 17, 2005
AN OIL-RICH jungle on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra, the Indonesian province of Aceh was the closest land mass to the epicenter of last December's Indian Ocean earthquake, and thus was the area hardest hit by the tsunami that quickly followed. An estimated 130,000 Acehnese were killed that day and at least another 400,000 left homeless. Even with international aid, the monumental task of reconstruction has been slow; some 150,000 Acehnese reportedly are still living in temporary camps and perhaps just as many simply remain homeless.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1999
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia -- It has become a hauntingly familiar drama in Indonesia: families huddling on a wind-swept pier or in a crowded bus station, fleeing a home that has become too dangerous as old grievances give rise to explosive separatist passions.Last time it was East Timor, which voted for independence from Indonesia in August only to be plunged into bloodshed that an Australian-led international military force was sent in to quell.Now it is Aceh (pronounced ah-CHAY), a lush, devoutly Islamic province that lies on the extreme western edge of the Indonesian archipelago.
NEWS
By Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock and Dinda Jouhana and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - The Indonesian government and Acehnese rebel leaders signed a landmark agreement yesterday in Helsinki, Finland, that ends one of Asia's longest-running wars and brings peace to a region devastated by conflict and the Dec. 26 tsunamis. After fighting for nearly 29 years, the rebel Free Aceh Movement agreed to drop its demand for independence for Aceh province in exchange for the chance to participate in elections. The government agreed to withdraw about half of its 30,000 troops from the province, release more than 1,400 political prisoners and grant amnesty to rebels.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The province of Aceh, where the United Nations estimates that 100,000 people have been displaced as a result of fighting, is without foreign aid workers because Indonesia has refused to give them permits, officials with the United Nations and other organizations say. A World Health Organization worker, who left Aceh on Friday because his permit was about to expire, was the last international aid worker in the province, U.N. officials...
NEWS
July 1, 2003
REPORTS FROM Aceh, the resource-rich Indonesian province on the northern tip of Sumatra, are grimmer by the day. With the only cease-fire in the 27-year war of independence between the Free Aceh Movement and Jakarta breaking down May 19 after just five months, the infamously brutal, increasingly powerful Indonesian army moved in to crush the 5,000 rebel guerillas - quickly followed by claims of executions, torture and school burnings and discoveries of...
NEWS
By Joseph Nevins | January 12, 2005
WHILE THE international spotlight focuses on the tsunami-related devastation in Indonesia's Aceh region, a deeper crisis - involving a brutal war - impacts Aceh's people while undermining the current humanitarian relief. Failure to link a just resolution of the conflict to the relief effort would severely limit attempts to redress the region's plight. The United States can and should play a key role in ensuring that such a linkage takes place. Aceh has suffered about 60 percent of the total deaths related to the tsunami.
NEWS
August 17, 2005
AN OIL-RICH jungle on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra, the Indonesian province of Aceh was the closest land mass to the epicenter of last December's Indian Ocean earthquake, and thus was the area hardest hit by the tsunami that quickly followed. An estimated 130,000 Acehnese were killed that day and at least another 400,000 left homeless. Even with international aid, the monumental task of reconstruction has been slow; some 150,000 Acehnese reportedly are still living in temporary camps and perhaps just as many simply remain homeless.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2004
LHOKSEUMAWE, Indonesia -- Mulyana, a 24-year-old housewife, had just sat down to a wedding party Sunday morning when the tsunami struck. She ran and held onto a coconut tree. Still, the water dragged her far out to sea. "I was alone in the middle of the ocean," Mulyana said yesterday from her hospital bed in this town on the northeastern coast of Aceh province, the area of Indonesia hit hardest by the disaster. "I was afraid of being pulled all the way to India." Mulyana, who cannot swim, said she clung to a coconut tree floating nearby.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Residents of the remote Indonesian island of Nias pulled hundreds of bodies from the rubble yesterday in the wake of a powerful earthquake Monday off the coast of Sumatra that flattened buildings, collapsed bridges and damaged the airport runway. The earthquake death toll has risen steadily. Officials put it at 330 yesterday. But Sumatra Gov. Rizal Nurdin estimated early today that the figure had risen to 1,000. Government officials have said it could climb as high as 2,000.
NEWS
January 29, 2005
Sprawl ruins the rolling hills of Maryland Some 50 short years ago, my brother and I would be picked up by a family friend on a July afternoon and begin an annual adventure, traveling from Towson through the Greenspring Valley out to Glyndon and Reisterstown and then onto Westminster and Taneytown, and ending up just shy of Emmitsburg at the friend's Hidden Valley Farm. At that time, Baltimore County and Carroll County were awash with greenery, canopies of trees, rolling hills and farm after farm.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 22, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - The United States Navy helicopter ferrying jugs of water and bags of jasmine rice fluttered above this village on the western coast of Sumatra. Down below, the Indian Ocean sparkled and the island's green volcanic peaks thrust up into the rain clouds. In between the mountains and the sea, a brownish smudge of toppled trees, crushed cars and rubble spread out for miles, as if leveled by a scythe. It's at this height that the scale of the destruction from the Dec. 26 earthquake and tsunami comes into focus and Indonesia's unfathomable death toll - which has now climbed to 166,320, according to the Indonesia Ministry of Health - becomes disturbingly comprehensible.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
DEPUTY DEFENSE Secretary Paul Wolfowitz paid a call on Jakarta over the weekend, and in his wake, U.S. and Indonesian defense officials talked of rising prospects for renewal of military cooperation, limited for more than a decade because of murders and other abuses by Indonesian forces in now independent East Timor. Not so fast. It's hard to disagree with the argument that access to U.S. training would serve as a civilizing influence on the Indonesian army. But that sizable carrot - along with other military aid or sales - ought to be held out only once it's clear that Jakarta will sufficiently rein in its military in the tsunami-battered province of Aceh to allow badly needed foreign relief efforts to proceed effectively.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
NEWS
January 17, 2005
Bolster the role of moderates in Indonesia What a pleasure to see The Sun's thoughtful column on the complexities of the political situation in Aceh ("From crisis, opportunity," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 12). There are forces within the Indonesian government that promote a peaceful settlement to the Aceh problem. But they are confronted by the hard-line military elements who would rather keep all foreign observers out of the province. It is particularly important that the U.S. government bolster the position of Indonesia's moderate voices by ensuring that aid delivery is not diverted and misused by the military but is delivered to its intended recipients.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono and Richard C. Paddock and Sari Sudarsono,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Residents of the remote Indonesian island of Nias pulled hundreds of bodies from the rubble yesterday in the wake of a powerful earthquake Monday off the coast of Sumatra that flattened buildings, collapsed bridges and damaged the airport runway. The earthquake death toll has risen steadily. Officials put it at 330 yesterday. But Sumatra Gov. Rizal Nurdin estimated early today that the figure had risen to 1,000. Government officials have said it could climb as high as 2,000.
NEWS
January 17, 2005
Bolster the role of moderates in Indonesia What a pleasure to see The Sun's thoughtful column on the complexities of the political situation in Aceh ("From crisis, opportunity," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 12). There are forces within the Indonesian government that promote a peaceful settlement to the Aceh problem. But they are confronted by the hard-line military elements who would rather keep all foreign observers out of the province. It is particularly important that the U.S. government bolster the position of Indonesia's moderate voices by ensuring that aid delivery is not diverted and misused by the military but is delivered to its intended recipients.
NEWS
By Joseph Nevins | January 12, 2005
WHILE THE international spotlight focuses on the tsunami-related devastation in Indonesia's Aceh region, a deeper crisis - involving a brutal war - impacts Aceh's people while undermining the current humanitarian relief. Failure to link a just resolution of the conflict to the relief effort would severely limit attempts to redress the region's plight. The United States can and should play a key role in ensuring that such a linkage takes place. Aceh has suffered about 60 percent of the total deaths related to the tsunami.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2004
LHOKSEUMAWE, Indonesia -- Mulyana, a 24-year-old housewife, had just sat down to a wedding party Sunday morning when the tsunami struck. She ran and held onto a coconut tree. Still, the water dragged her far out to sea. "I was alone in the middle of the ocean," Mulyana said yesterday from her hospital bed in this town on the northeastern coast of Aceh province, the area of Indonesia hit hardest by the disaster. "I was afraid of being pulled all the way to India." Mulyana, who cannot swim, said she clung to a coconut tree floating nearby.
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