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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The federal highway safety agency has overstated the effectiveness of state laws that lower the level of alcohol in the bloodstream needed to classify an individual as legally drunk, a government review has found. The review concluded that lowering the blood-alcohol limit alone did not demonstrably reduce the number or severity of alcohol-related car crashes.The review, by the General Accounting Office, challenged the findings of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in several published studies commissioned by the safety agency, which supports tighter restrictions on drinking and driving.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Katharine W. Dougherty, a retired University of Maryland, Baltimore County office worker, died Aug. 28 at her Millersville home of chronic myeloid leukemia. She was 77. The daughter of G. Theodore Weis, a Baltimore City psychiatric court clerk, and Gladys D. Weis, who took over her husband's job after his death, the former Katharine Amelia Weis was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. She left Eastern High School in the 11th grade and took a job in the admissions office at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 17, 1994
.TC WASHINGTON -- The government's watchdog agency, the General Accounting Office, has strayed from its original fact-finding mission and tarnished its reputation for objectivity by becoming an advocate for policy changes, an independent evaluation of the agency says.The study, in effect an audit of the government's top auditors, was issued last week by a panel of experts from the National Academy of Public Administration, a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress to increase the effectiveness of government.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
A Morgan State University employee with a previous record of theft was indicted this week, with prosecutors alleging he stole $66,000 in state funds. Robert Lee Terrell, 70, of Baltimore was arrested Tuesday and charged with five counts of felony theft and one count of felony theft scheme, according to the Maryland Attorney General's Office. The indictment did not provide details on how Terrell allegedly stole the money and prosecutors declined to elaborate on the charges. Terrell was the director of the Restricted Funds Accounting office, which oversees grants and contracts, and was hired in 2004, according to the university.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Labaton and Stephen Labaton,New York Times News Service | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The nation's senior auditor has found that the fund that protects bank deposits is in substantially worse shape than has been reported and may be worth only about half of the $8.4 billion that regulators previously calculated, a top banking official said yesterday.L. William Seidman, chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., said yesterday in an interview that the General Accounting Office's annual audit of the bank insurance fund, to be released Friday, would show that the fund might be worth only about $4 billion to $5 billion.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A senior White House official said Hillary Rodham Clinton urged him last year to replace members of the travel office with "our people," congressional investigators reported yesterday.The report by the General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, goes significantly beyond a White House review last July of the dismissal of all seven employees of the travel office on May 19. The new account depicts Mrs. Clinton as playing a more active role in the dismissals after the White House accused the workers of mismanagement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Two years ago, the problem with the Air Force's B-2 Stealth bombers, which cost $2 billion apiece, was that their radar could not tell a rain cloud from a mountainside.Now the problem is that the B-2 cannot go out in the rain.The investigative arm of Congress reported this week that the B-2, the world's most expensive aircraft, deteriorates in rain, heat and humidity. It "must be sheltered or exposed only to the most benign environments -- low humidity, no precipitation, moderate temperatures," said the report by the General Accounting Office.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - The General Accounting Office, an arm of Congress, sued Vice President Dick Cheney yesterday to try to force the White House to reveal the identities of energy industry executives who helped the administration develop a national energy policy last year. It was the first time in the GAO's 80-year history that the agency had filed suit against a member of the executive branch for failing to turn over records to Congress. The lawsuit sets up a legal showdown between the accounting office, which is the investigative agency of Congress, and the White House over access to records of the national energy task force, of which Cheney was chairman.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Labaton and Stephen Labaton,New York Times News Service | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The General Accounting Office advised Congress yesterday to reject the Bush administration's request for an immediate $55 billion to complete the savings and loan bailout, saying federal regulators were unable to keep track of the billions of dollars in assets they now oversee.Shortly before Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady conveyed the administration's request to the Senate Banking Committee, GAO officials recommended that Congress instead offer just enough to continue the bailout until spring of next year.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 16, 2009
Cash-strapped Baltimore has unearthed a nearly $40 million windfall, after auditors realized that an obscure account had been accumulating tax payments for about a decade. Finance Department employees were supposed to manually transfer money from partial tax payments into the city's operating budget. But because of staff turnover and poor communication, no transfers had taken place for years, city officials acknowledged Wednesday in disclosing the results of an annual audit. City Finance Director Edward Gallagher said he was "embarrassed" when he learned of the oversight.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | August 21, 2012
UPDATE: On Thursday Rawlings-Blake spokesman Ryan O'Doherty issued this statement: "We are communicating with the Baltimore Sun and other media outlets to provide a detailed briefing in the near future on the CitiStat program and the kinds of datasets that are available and we hope it is helpful and illuminating to the Sun's readership. In the meantime, we always encourage the public to visit our OpenBaltimore website which includes much of the same data and more public information than most local governments provide.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 16, 2009
Cash-strapped Baltimore has unearthed a nearly $40 million windfall, after auditors realized that an obscure account had been accumulating tax payments for about a decade. Finance Department employees were supposed to manually transfer money from partial tax payments into the city's operating budget. But because of staff turnover and poor communication, no transfers had taken place for years, city officials acknowledged Wednesday in disclosing the results of an annual audit. City Finance Director Edward Gallagher said he was "embarrassed" when he learned of the oversight.
BUSINESS
By Houston Chronicle | November 16, 2006
HOUSTON -- Richard Causey, Enron Corp.'s former top accountant whose affable nature earned him the nickname of "Pillsbury Doughboy" at a company known for its ruthless culture, will serve 5 1/2 years in prison for his role in perpetuating its sprawling fraud. "There were improper things done at Enron. Some of those things were done by me, and for that I am profoundly sorry," a visibly nervous Causey told U.S. District Judge Simeon Lake before learning his punishment. "However, as God is my witness, I never did anything to enrich myself," Causey said.
NEWS
August 18, 2004
PEOPLE WHO spend a lot of time in and around the Chesapeake Bay gauge the success of restoration efforts by the white bathing suit test: Does the suit stay white after it's been in the water? That may not be a scientific measure of the level of pollutants, such as phosphorus and nitrogen, but it clearly indicates whether conditions are getting better or worse. Which may be more than the complicated computer modeling of the federal-state partnership, charged with managing the bay cleanup, is able to do. Using calculations and projections, the Chesapeake Bay Program boasts that phosphorus pollution has dropped by 28 percent since 1985, while nitrogen pollution declined by 18 percent.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | February 29, 2004
The advertisements promise a hassle-free and perk-filled process for getting rid of a clunker. "Donate your vehicle to charity. Avoid the trouble of selling it yourself and get a tax break." But what they aren't telling you is how doing it the wrong way can set off sirens at the Internal Revenue Service and shortchange the charity. If you're thinking of donating a vehicle, there are a few things to keep in mind about the process. Raising red flags The IRS supports the idea of reducing your tax burden, as long as you do it legitimately.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Vice President Dick Cheney won a major victory yesterday when a federal district judge here threw out a suit, brought by the head of the General Accounting Office, to require him to release records of the Bush administration's energy task force, which Cheney led. Though the ruling made no fundamental pronouncement on the separation-of-powers issues that Cheney had insisted were at the heart of the case, it served as a judicial validation for...
NEWS
August 18, 2004
PEOPLE WHO spend a lot of time in and around the Chesapeake Bay gauge the success of restoration efforts by the white bathing suit test: Does the suit stay white after it's been in the water? That may not be a scientific measure of the level of pollutants, such as phosphorus and nitrogen, but it clearly indicates whether conditions are getting better or worse. Which may be more than the complicated computer modeling of the federal-state partnership, charged with managing the bay cleanup, is able to do. Using calculations and projections, the Chesapeake Bay Program boasts that phosphorus pollution has dropped by 28 percent since 1985, while nitrogen pollution declined by 18 percent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Katharine W. Dougherty, a retired University of Maryland, Baltimore County office worker, died Aug. 28 at her Millersville home of chronic myeloid leukemia. She was 77. The daughter of G. Theodore Weis, a Baltimore City psychiatric court clerk, and Gladys D. Weis, who took over her husband's job after his death, the former Katharine Amelia Weis was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. She left Eastern High School in the 11th grade and took a job in the admissions office at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - The General Accounting Office, an arm of Congress, sued Vice President Dick Cheney yesterday to try to force the White House to reveal the identities of energy industry executives who helped the administration develop a national energy policy last year. It was the first time in the GAO's 80-year history that the agency had filed suit against a member of the executive branch for failing to turn over records to Congress. The lawsuit sets up a legal showdown between the accounting office, which is the investigative agency of Congress, and the White House over access to records of the national energy task force, of which Cheney was chairman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 29, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush defended yesterday his refusal to turn over information to Congress about contacts between Enron and the administration's energy task force, saying the request was "an encroachment on the executive branch's ability to conduct business." "We're not going to let the ability for us to discuss matters between ourselves to become eroded," the president said at a session with reporters yesterday afternoon. "It's not only important for us, for this administration, it's an important principle for future administrations."
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