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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blaketold Baltimore lawmakers Friday morning that any shift of the state's teacher pension costs to local governments must take into account the relative wealth of the jurisdiction -- saying the failure to do so is her "biggest disappointment" with Gov.Martin O'Malley's plan for a 50-50 split. The mayor said she would prefer not to see any shift of pension costs from the state, which now pays 100 percent of the tab, to the 23 counties and Baltimore. However, she said she understood that the state faces its own budget challenges and that the change has been coming a long time.
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NEWS
By James B. Astrachan | October 2, 2014
Violations of civil rights by the Baltimore City Police Department are at best a callous disregard for the rights of citizens; at worst, they are criminal. They are also horrendously expensive for the city's taxpayers. More than $20 million has been paid out in the past decade, according to reports in The Sun and Daily Record, to resolve claims that officers used excessive force or engaged in otherwise improper conduct, such as denial of due process, unreasonable searches and seizures and other violations of civil rights.
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BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | September 20, 1992
New York -- It's time to rethink your checking account. An account that made sense when banks were paying 5 percent on daily balances may be a loser now that rates are so low. The average yield on interest-paying checking accounts has dropped to 2.25 percent, less than half what they paid a year ago, according to the Bank Rate Monitor. At commercial banks around the country, it's 2.18; at S&Ls, it's 2.33.Unable to promote high rates any more, banks are turning to ads for so-called free checking accounts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
August 15, 2011
Re: Ending Candy Thomson's outdoor column. I cannot believe how shortsighted the Baltimore Sun is to end Candy's column and blog. Her column was essential reading for those who care about our incredible natural resources. She shined light on those who broke the law and abused the bay's bounty, and held elected officials accountable for their stewardship (or lack thereof). Her column educated, inspired and amused. How could you take that away? John Surrick, Annapolis
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 14, 2009
To the chagrin of many readers, I defended the Maryland Transportation Authority's decision this year to impose a $1.50-a-month fee on E-ZPass accounts. It was a sound business move because it pushed some subscribers to drop inactive accounts that were costing the state money. But in doing so, the authority assumed the responsibility of making timely refunds of the money it held on behalf of those subscribers. And from what I'm hearing from readers such as John B. Ramsey of New Carrollton, the authority has bungled the job of giving back people's money.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Earle Palmer Brown is back in the saddle again with the Roy Rogers restaurant advertising account.The restaurant chain said yesterday that it had selected the Bethesda-based advertising agency to oversee the $20 million account. The agency had the account from 1986 until 1990, when Hardee's Food Systems Inc. acquired the chain and moved the account to Ogilvy & Mather in New York.Hardee's began converting many of the Roy Rogers restaurants to Hardee's, but consumers rebelled. In March, Hardee's began turning those restaurants back into Roy Rogers outlets.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 1990
NEW YORK -- MCI Communications Corp. pulled its $50 million account from Wells, Rich, Greene yesterday and gave it to Messner Vetere Berger Carey Schmetterer, a small New York agency.Executives at MCI would not comment on why the company had switched its account. But advertising executives familiar with MCI's plans said the company had moved its account in large part because of management changes at MCI earlier this year involving executives in charge of the company's advertising.The transfer of the MCI account comes as the long-distance telephone company finds itself under growing pressure from shareholders to improve its performance.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1996
Trahan, Burden & Charles Inc., a Baltimore advertising agency enjoying a growth spurt, has scored a national account to develop ad campaigns for a major computer company.Micron Electronics Inc., a Nampa, Idaho, company that designs and manufactures computers and has $1.8 billion in annual sales, tapped the agency to develop advertising for products including personal computers, hardware and software.The company, which sells through phone orders and the Internet, had handled advertising in-house.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
An accountant for an Eldersburg car dealership admitted in Carroll Circuit Court yesterday that he stole more than $625,000 from the business since 1988.Stephen Clifton Sheeler, 47, of Rosedale, Baltimore County, pleaded guilty to one count of felony theft. Sheeler admitted writing more than $625,000 worth of checks to himself from Jeff Barnes' Chevrolet-Geo.In exchange for Sheeler's guilty plea, prosecutors agreed to drop 12 other felony theft charges.Carroll Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. ordered a presentence investigation of Sheeler and set sentencing for March 24.Sheeler could receive up to 15 years in prison, but prosecutors said yesterday they will wait to see the presentence investigation report before they recommend a sentence to the judge.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Bethesda-based accounting, tax and consulting firm Watkins Meegan LLC will combine its practice with one of the country's leading firms, New York-based CohnReznick LLP, in an agreement expected to take effect Nov. 1. The combined firm is expected to have annual revenues of $600 million, nearly 300 partners, about 2,750 employees and 28 offices. Founded in 1975, Watkins Meegan also has offices in Annapolis and Herndon and Tysons Corner, Va. CohnReznick, the nation's 10 t h largest accounting firm, has offices in Baltimore and Bethesda.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Moving quickly to quell resident concerns about police actions during the arrest of four at Gilmor Homes on Wednesday, a top Baltimore police commander walked the housing project and assigned investigators to look into the case. Residents of the West Baltimore development said city police acted aggressively when arresting people who had flocked to intervene in a struggle between a man and officers. Some said an officer used a Taser on a woman holding a young child. Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said he personally viewed city surveillance camera footage of the incident and disputed the witness accounts, saying the woman had handed off the child before she was struck with the Taser.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Word of an attack in Federal Hill appeared Monday on a neighborhood Facebook page, warning that a man had been stabbed early Sunday after being chased for his wallet. As news spread, different accounts emerged. A posting on the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association page said that, according to Baltimore police, the victim had been seen "staggering around" the 1200 block of Wall St. and had gotten into an "altercation" with a group of people. Then another posting reported additional information — that turned out to be wrong and led some to believe another man had been stabbed Monday outside the bars on Charles Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Lester J. Bartholomew, a retired tax accountant, died Saturday at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson of complications from a fall. He was 100. Lester John Bartholomew was born in Reading, Pa., and later moved with his family to Laurel. He graduated from Laurel High School, where he had been a member of the school's tennis team. He earned a degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore and from the 1940s through the 1970s was a tax accountant and treasurer of the Cannon Shoe Co. Mr. Bartholomew later was a tax accountant for American Totalizator Co. and the Strut Group, a family-owned commercial and residential building firm, from which he retired in 1992.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 5, 1993
Freed & Associates, a small Baltimore advertising firm, has edged out two larger Baltimore firms to become the agency for the Eastern region of Domino's Pizza Inc.The contract award will mean an additional five jobs at the 22-person Freed agency, said President Gloria Freed. "This will be our biggest piece of business," she said.Wanda Newcity, regional marketing director for Domino's, estimated that the deal will mean $3 million in annual billings for Freed. In 1992, Freed had $12 million in billings and expected to grow to $18 million in 1993 without the Domino's account, Ms. Freed said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal investigators have found evidence that the former head of the White House travel office deposited money that news organizations paid for presidential trips into his own bank account and may have diverted some of it to his personal use, law-enforcement officials said yesterday.About $55,000 in news media money was deposited into the bank account of the former official, Billy R. Dale, from 1988 to 1991, the officials said, referring to a review of Mr. Dale's bank records.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
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