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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
Olga Amy, a pianist who accompanied baton twirlers and teen singers on "The Collegians" and "Candy Corner" variety shows on 1950s Baltimore television, died Tuesday in her sleep at Manor Care in Roland Park. She was 94.Known by the stage name Pat Deal, she was a well-known figure on the local amateur talent scene for 40 years. She taught voice and piano, was a house pianist for dancing schools and played organ on the television programs, which were two of Baltimore's earliest locally produced shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 17, 2004
If you didn't see the wide smile on her face, you might suspect this Polish singer of severe diva-itis. But she's just having fun, and, come to think of it, she's really not even stretching the truth too far in the process. With a 3 1/2 -octave range that stretches from baritonal depths up to a high mezzo's rarefied realm, Podles boasts one of the rarest and most visceral of voice types - the true contralto. But that's just the beginning. Add in a stunningly rich sound, agility to sail through the elaborately ornamented style of coloratura singing, and a wonderfully extroverted personality, and you've got what pianist (and occasional Podles accompanist)
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FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | October 18, 1999
F. Scott Black's Towson Dinner Theatre. "Beauty & the Beast." 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. today and tomorrow. Ages 18 and under only. Prepare a song and provide sheet music. All roles open and paid."Grease." 7: 30 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. Oct. 25-26. Prepare a song from the show or a 1950s song -- accompanist provided. Also be prepared to dance. Both auditions are at the theater, 100 E. Chesapeake Ave. Call 410-321-6595.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
The Howard County Center of African American Culture will present its sixth Talent Showcase at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Instructional Lab Building at Howard Community College. "We have over 25 students who will be performing, ages 5-12. They are featuring dancing, singing, monologues, rapping, instrumental, as well as gymnastics. And it's a glorious thing to see these students performing at such a young age," said the center's executive director, Wylene S. Burch. The showcase, "Spotlighting the Talents of Howard County," is not competitive.
FEATURES
By GLENN McNATT | January 21, 1996
YEARS OF CHILD- hood movie-watching have made me a soft touch for those show-business sagas in which a terrific young talent creates a sensation after receiving the proverbial last-minute call to fill in for some indisposed star. The story, in any of its various permutations, is one of Hollywood's most durable myths -- that talent will out regardless of the odds.Yet all myths contain at least a grain of truth, and in real life I am continually surprised by how often things actually turn out that way.For example, when soprano Jessye Norman performed at Baltimore's Meyerhoff Hall a few seasons back, a young Peabody graduate named Mark Markham counted himself lucky just to be allowed to turn pages for Phillip Moll, the veteran pianist who accompanied Ms. Norman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | September 18, 1992
No one can accuse Mark Markham of hiding his talents under a bushel.The young pianist is a gifted vocal accompanist (almost every singer in town, from the Peabody Conservatory's internationally renowned soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson on down loves to work with him); he's much in demand as a chamber-music pianist; he's a persuasive exponent of new music (he and Bryn-Julson will give the world premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Charles Wuorinen's "A Winter's Tale" in November); he's a popular vocal coach (he teaches 30 hours a week at Peabody)
NEWS
By BARBARA MALLONEE | June 7, 1991
No one recites at a spring recital. Beyond a word of welcome, concert halls are hushed as the season of the solo cycles round for children faint with fear.''But you know your piece,'' whispers the mother as she and the child approach a doorway into a hall where rows and rows of chairs are already filled with parents silently paging through programs.''But I should have brought it,'' the child whispers back. She doesn't say the unspeakable -- ''What if I forget?'' -- but, crossing the threshold, shoes polished, hair ribbons new, she feels her knees grow weak at the sight of a stage whose steps she far too soon will ascend, her accompanist (holding her music)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2001
Annaliesa Place went for broke in her violin recital for the "Music in the Great Hall" series, gambling on two virtuoso, emotion-packed works that can test the greatest of fiddlers. The young player didn't exactly hit the jackpot, but she didn't lose her shirt, either. This recent degree-earner at Peabody Conservatory, where she won the Yale Gordon Concerto Competition, demonstrated poise and preparation during Sunday's concert. Her tone, given a resonant lift by the acoustics at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church, had a burnished quality, and her technique was up to most of the challenges.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the legendary soprano who died in her adopted Baltimore 20 years ago this week, loved helping young singers get started. She probably would have enjoyed the chance to work with Stefania Dovhan, the promising University of Maryland student who won the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition. Dovhan gave a recital Sunday afternoon at the intimate and elegant Gildenhorn Recital Hall in the university's new Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, presented by the Rosa Ponselle Foundation.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
The Howard County Center of African American Culture will present its sixth Talent Showcase at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Instructional Lab Building at Howard Community College. "We have over 25 students who will be performing, ages 5-12. They are featuring dancing, singing, monologues, rapping, instrumental, as well as gymnastics. And it's a glorious thing to see these students performing at such a young age," said the center's executive director, Wylene S. Burch. The showcase, "Spotlighting the Talents of Howard County," is not competitive.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the legendary soprano who died in her adopted Baltimore 20 years ago this week, loved helping young singers get started. She probably would have enjoyed the chance to work with Stefania Dovhan, the promising University of Maryland student who won the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition. Dovhan gave a recital Sunday afternoon at the intimate and elegant Gildenhorn Recital Hall in the university's new Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, presented by the Rosa Ponselle Foundation.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2001
Annaliesa Place went for broke in her violin recital for the "Music in the Great Hall" series, gambling on two virtuoso, emotion-packed works that can test the greatest of fiddlers. The young player didn't exactly hit the jackpot, but she didn't lose her shirt, either. This recent degree-earner at Peabody Conservatory, where she won the Yale Gordon Concerto Competition, demonstrated poise and preparation during Sunday's concert. Her tone, given a resonant lift by the acoustics at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church, had a burnished quality, and her technique was up to most of the challenges.
NEWS
September 23, 2000
Helen M. Egan, who played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s in her native Pennsylvania, died Wednesday of heart failure at her Timonium home. She was 91. As a youth growing up in the coal country of northeastern Pennsylvania, Mrs. Egan, a violinist, and her pianist sister provided musical background for silent movies in theaters in the Pottsville, Pa., area, before the advent of Vitaphone talking pictures in 1927. Born Helen McCann in New Boston, Pa., she was raised in St. Clair, Pa., where she attended public schools and a business school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 9, 2000
Violinist Midori stood on the stage at Peabody's Friedberg Concert Hall, slender, youthful and completely focused on the music she was creating. Just behind her, Robert McDonald sat at a grand piano. The program the duo performed last fall included Mozart's Sonata in A Major and Franck's Sonata in A Major; the music made by each performer fit together like tightly clasped hands. Midori's playing was first fiery then serene then fiery again. McDonald's piano music filled and shaped the spaces between the violinist's notes.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | December 6, 1999
Centennial High School. Combined adult/student production of the musical "Pippin." 7 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday at Centennial High School. Student parts restricted to Centennial High School students, but adults needed to fill cast of 40. Also needed is a boy age 8-10 who can sing, dance and act, to play the part of Theo. Prepare a song and dress for movement. Accompanist provided. Call 410-313-2856.Chesapeake Music Hall. "My Fair Lady." 1 p.m. Dec. 18 and 7 p.m. Dec. 21 at the theater, 339 Busch's Frontage Road, Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
Olga Amy, a pianist who accompanied baton twirlers and teen singers on "The Collegians" and "Candy Corner" variety shows on 1950s Baltimore television, died Tuesday in her sleep at Manor Care in Roland Park. She was 94.Known by the stage name Pat Deal, she was a well-known figure on the local amateur talent scene for 40 years. She taught voice and piano, was a house pianist for dancing schools and played organ on the television programs, which were two of Baltimore's earliest locally produced shows.
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