Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAccidental Death
IN THE NEWS

Accidental Death

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Did you know?-- Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., killing nearly 5,000 people each year. - American College of Emergency Physicians
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2014
An article in the May 2, 1914 edition of The Argus reported an lawsuit after the accidental death of man. For the death of Diedrick Albers , who was killed July 30, 1913, by an electric shock while on the premises at the corner of Wilkens and Beechfield avenues, suit for $15,000 damages was brought Tuesday in the City Court by his widow and daughter. The suit is against the Consolidated Gas Electric Light and Power Company, the Patapsco Electric and Manufacturing Company and Catherine Textor and William A. Smith , trustees of the estate of the late Anton Textor , to whom the property belonged.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 16, 1994
An article in Tuesday's editions of The Sun about the indictment of a woman in the accidental death of her baby in Severn incorrectly reported the police agency that investigated the death. It was investigated by Anne Arundel County police.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was playing Jenga at his Randallstown home when he heard the rock hit his door. The officer ran out and chased the teenager he saw running away, his lawyers said, touching off an altercation that led to Christopher Brown's "completely accidental" death. The account came Tuesday during Laboard's manslaughter trial, in which the defense laid out his side of the story for the first time. His attorneys said in opening statements that Brown, 17, had punched the off-duty officer and that Laboard had used his body weight in an attempt to subdue the teen.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 24, 2005
Frederick police are investigating the death of a Hood College student whose body was discovered in her dormitory room yesterday after she failed to show up for class. Police are calling the death of Rebecca Sullivan, a senior honors student from New Jersey, "suspicious" and are looking into "every possibility," including suicide or an accidental death, said college spokesman Dave Diehl. Students - 1,900 undergraduates and graduates - were notified of the death in two e-mails yesterday, and a letter will go out to parents today, Diehl said.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | January 10, 1999
HERE'S A New Year's resolution that could save you thousands of dollars of needless home mortgage expense: Be on guard for a new wave of insurance pitches from your lender promising you low-cost life, credit, disability or accidental death benefits coverage.The odds are, say independent insurance and mortgage industry experts, that the coverage you're being offered is available elsewhere for a lot less -- if you need it at all.Consider the intriguing offer that came in the mail last month to a number of Maryland homeowners in the Washington suburbs from their mortgage company.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering requiring pool operators to keep defibrillators among their safety equipment. "The most important job of government is to protect public health and safety, and this legislation is a common-sense solution to save lives," said Country Executive John R. Leopold, at whose request "Connor's Law" was introduced Monday. The bill named for Connor John-James Freed, a 5-year-old who drowned in Crofton in 2006. A lifeguard at the Crofton Country Club can be heard on the 911 recording saying that the pool had an automatic external defibrillator but she was not allowed to use it because she was not trained in its use. The Red Cross now requires training on the devices.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A summer evening of merriment and drinking that ended with one man accidentally causing the death of an acquaintance led to a plea Tuesday to second-degree assault in an Anne Arundel County courtroom. Ryan Richard Hynson, 25, from Glen Burnie, had been charged with manslaughter in the death of Robert Raeke Jr., 23, an Iraq war veteran who lived nearby. Terms of the plea before Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Michele D. Jaklitsch give Hynson three years of supervised probation that includes psychiatric evaluation, with a five-year suspended prison sentence.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Del Shores' "Sordid Lives," a self-described "black comedy about white trash," is now in rehearsal at Bowie Playhouse for a Jan. 21 opening. The Bowie Community Theatre production is being directed by John Nunemaker. "Sordid Lives" is about a Texas family gathering for the matriarch's funeral. Characters include the matriarch's sister, adult daughters and several friends who are coping with her accidental death. Playwright Shores has cautioned directors and actors to not make caricatures of the people in this dysfunctional Texas family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
A man hangs from a rope connected to the beam of a barn, his feet smashing through a wooden crate so he looks like he's cut off at the knees. His wife explains that when he was angered or annoyed, he would go to that spot, get up on a bucket, put a noose around his neck and threaten suicide. On the fatal day, she placed the bucket elsewhere, so he grabbed the crate. Is this a picture of accidental death, as she contends? Or is it suicide — or murder? This scene doesn't belong to a forensic TV series like "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering requiring pool operators to keep defibrillators among their safety equipment. "The most important job of government is to protect public health and safety, and this legislation is a common-sense solution to save lives," said Country Executive John R. Leopold, at whose request "Connor's Law" was introduced Monday. The bill named for Connor John-James Freed, a 5-year-old who drowned in Crofton in 2006. A lifeguard at the Crofton Country Club can be heard on the 911 recording saying that the pool had an automatic external defibrillator but she was not allowed to use it because she was not trained in its use. The Red Cross now requires training on the devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
A man hangs from a rope connected to the beam of a barn, his feet smashing through a wooden crate so he looks like he's cut off at the knees. His wife explains that when he was angered or annoyed, he would go to that spot, get up on a bucket, put a noose around his neck and threaten suicide. On the fatal day, she placed the bucket elsewhere, so he grabbed the crate. Is this a picture of accidental death, as she contends? Or is it suicide — or murder? This scene doesn't belong to a forensic TV series like "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | April 27, 2011
I read the obituaries every day. They interest me in a way that the articles in the fancy architecture magazines do: I enjoy the stories and the histories of the subjects — the old, the eccentric, the beautiful, the flawed — all of them have a way of speaking to me even from a distance. I am not in the market, but three recent Baltimore deaths have made me stop and take a second look. As a law student in the early 1980s, I lived in the West Baltimore neighborhood of Ridgeley's Delight — then still pretty rough: a gun shot heard at night from time to time; a seafood warehouse stood where Camden Yards is now; Harbor East and $35 steaks were not yet a glimmer in a real-estate developer's eye. It was cheap, though, and on the weekends we could walk to Harborplace to people-watch, there was a buzz and a hum at the Cross Street Market on the weekends, and the brick facades on Federal Hill were being pointed up. At that time kids from the suburbs did not move to the city, and if they did, certainly not to stay unless there was a good reason.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A summer evening of merriment and drinking that ended with one man accidentally causing the death of an acquaintance led to a plea Tuesday to second-degree assault in an Anne Arundel County courtroom. Ryan Richard Hynson, 25, from Glen Burnie, had been charged with manslaughter in the death of Robert Raeke Jr., 23, an Iraq war veteran who lived nearby. Terms of the plea before Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Michele D. Jaklitsch give Hynson three years of supervised probation that includes psychiatric evaluation, with a five-year suspended prison sentence.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Del Shores' "Sordid Lives," a self-described "black comedy about white trash," is now in rehearsal at Bowie Playhouse for a Jan. 21 opening. The Bowie Community Theatre production is being directed by John Nunemaker. "Sordid Lives" is about a Texas family gathering for the matriarch's funeral. Characters include the matriarch's sister, adult daughters and several friends who are coping with her accidental death. Playwright Shores has cautioned directors and actors to not make caricatures of the people in this dysfunctional Texas family.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
City homicide detectives were on the scene of a death in the Tuscany- Canterbury neighborhood of North Baltimore, but police said the cause appeared to be accidental. Police said they were investigating a suspicious death Wednesday afternoon in the 3900 block of Cloverhill Road, just north of the Johns Hopkins University. A short time later, a police spokesman said officials believed the victim had fallen from a ladder. Additional details were not immediately available. justin.fenton@baltsun.com > > Most recent updates
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was playing Jenga at his Randallstown home when he heard the rock hit his door. The officer ran out and chased the teenager he saw running away, his lawyers said, touching off an altercation that led to Christopher Brown's "completely accidental" death. The account came Tuesday during Laboard's manslaughter trial, in which the defense laid out his side of the story for the first time. His attorneys said in opening statements that Brown, 17, had punched the off-duty officer and that Laboard had used his body weight in an attempt to subdue the teen.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | April 27, 2011
I read the obituaries every day. They interest me in a way that the articles in the fancy architecture magazines do: I enjoy the stories and the histories of the subjects — the old, the eccentric, the beautiful, the flawed — all of them have a way of speaking to me even from a distance. I am not in the market, but three recent Baltimore deaths have made me stop and take a second look. As a law student in the early 1980s, I lived in the West Baltimore neighborhood of Ridgeley's Delight — then still pretty rough: a gun shot heard at night from time to time; a seafood warehouse stood where Camden Yards is now; Harbor East and $35 steaks were not yet a glimmer in a real-estate developer's eye. It was cheap, though, and on the weekends we could walk to Harborplace to people-watch, there was a buzz and a hum at the Cross Street Market on the weekends, and the brick facades on Federal Hill were being pointed up. At that time kids from the suburbs did not move to the city, and if they did, certainly not to stay unless there was a good reason.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
Only in hindsight did it strike anyone as odd: Carrie John never seemed to invite friends and neighbors into her Ridgely's Delight rowhouse. Instead, she would meet friends out, or people would watch from the corner to make sure she got in after a night at the bar. "None of us ever went inside," said a friend, Julie Della-Maria. The reason might have been the "huge gardens" of marijuana and assorted pills that police found on the day John, a 29-year-old drug abuse researcher, died after injecting what she thought was a narcotic.
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Did you know?-- Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., killing nearly 5,000 people each year. - American College of Emergency Physicians
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.