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Access To Health

NEWS
June 14, 1993
Canada health planThe Evening Sun (May 3) and other sources have reported that government experts predict that President Clinton's health care plan may cost between $100 billion and $150 billion annually.Although health care reform is certainly needed, increased spending is neither desirable nor necessary.The United States already spends far more per person on health care than any other country in the world, and yet we are the only industrialized nation except South Africa that doesn't guarantee universal access to health care to all citizens.
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FEATURES
February 23, 1993
The Women's Law Center is sponsoring an all-day conference exploring women's health care issues Saturday at Goucher College in Towson."The Medical Gender Gap and the Crisis in Women's Health Care: Medical, Legal and Political Issues" will bring together physicians, public policy researchers, sociologists, epidemiologists and attorneys to discuss such issues as fighting for research money, breast implants and access to health care.Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen Health Research Group and author of "Women's Health Alert," will deliver the keynote speech at 9 a.m. Other participants include Grant Bagley from the Food and Drug Administration; Frances Visco, president of the National Breast Cancer Coalition; Devra Davis, a scholar from the National Academy of Sciences; and Trudy Bush, an epidemiology professor at Johns Hopkins' School of Hygiene and Public Health who is helping run clinical trials to study the effects of hormone replacement therapy.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | February 11, 1993
THE Health Care Financing Administration, the folks in the federal government who run the Medicare program, just issued a report stating that our collective bill for health care will hit $1.7 trillion by the year 2000.In less than seven years medical costs will be eating up more than 18 percent of the nation's entire economic output. Current rates of spending on medical care in the United States are absolutely bonkers. Health care costs are ruining our economic competitiveness, skewing our domestic spending, destroying jobs and ruining our children's future by saddling them with backbreaking levels of debt.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hillary Clinton will need all of her lawyerly skills as she tries to forge a consensus on health care reform, an issue on which special interests and their congressional allies have blocked change for years.Recognizing the obstacles posed by interest groups and the sheer complexity of the issue, Mr. Clinton yesterday named his closest adviser -- his wife -- as the unpaid head of a health care task force. Mrs. Clinton, an attorney, served in a similar position in 1983 by helping her husband, then governor of Arkansas, buck teachers and other interests to pass school reform legislation.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | September 6, 1992
When Pennsylvania's Harris Wofford won an upset victory over Attorney General Richard Thornburgh to retain his Senate seat last fall, his relentless emphasis on health care got much of the credit.Politicians across the country -- including President Bush -- began to pay more attention to the issue. It looked as if health care reform had finally made it onto the political agenda in a big way.With the presidential campaign in full swing, access to health care is still a big concern with voters.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | April 7, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A January summit conference raised the issue of health care reform with sound and fury. But at the end of the General Assembly's regular session last night, the legislature had little to show for its efforts to make health care more available and affordable to Marylanders."
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | February 5, 1992
AN ESPECIALLY pathetic event took place in the House of Representatives last week. A man labored mightily only to give birth to a mouse.President Bush had promised that he would lay out a bold vision for health care in his State of the Union address. But what we BTC got was mousy, not bold.The president had assured the voters of New Hampshire that he understood what it meant to lose one's job and thus lose one's health insurance; he had told the people of Pennsylvania that he got their message about the importance of health care access when they sent Dick Thornburgh packing.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
Improving America's health care system to eliminate what are seen as inequities and disparities between blacks and whites has been urged by civil rights advocates and health care officials."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | September 2, 1991
Seattle. - Rarely have the nation's governors exhibited the collective outrage, frustration and resolve to rouse a somnolent federal government as they did in debating health care at their annual meeting here recently.''What you saw . . . was a controlled explosion of anger,'' said Washington's Booth Gardner, the National Governors' Association's outgoing chairman. ''Now,'' he predicted, ''you'll see a chain reaction throughout the states as we mobilize to address health reform. And we believe this will translate into action at the federal level.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration has received another recommendation to broaden the nation's health-care system to protect the uninsured poor.Various health policy experts estimated that the cost to the federal government would be at least $4 billion a year. Medicaid, a state-federal program, already finances health care for 27 million poor Americans.A report drafted for an advisory panel appointed by the administration is recommending that Medicaid be expanded to cover doctors' services and hospital care for an estimated 10 million people below the poverty level who have no insurance.
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