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Access To Health

NEWS
September 15, 2006
If you hope to experience a long, healthy life, you may not want to be in Baltimore. A recent study puts life expectancy in the city at 68.6 years, the lowest in the state and among the worst in the country. By contrast, residents of Montgomery County can expect to live 81.3 years, the highest longevity rate in the state and among the highest in the country. The situation cries out for changes in access to health care for the most vulnerable city residents. Health researchers at Harvard University found that only six areas averaged lower life expectancy rates than Baltimore and those were counties in South Dakota that house a number of Native American reservations.
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NEWS
July 16, 2006
Medicaid mandate cuts access to care As of July 1, a misguided new federal mandate requires most U.S.-born Medicaid recipients to prove citizenship as a condition of receiving benefits ("Too simple to work," editorial, July 11). This policy may affect more than 550,000 lower-income Marylanders. While the rule's purported objective is to stop waste and fraud, the predictable effect will be to hassle deserving low-income families in ways that will cause many of them to drop from the rolls of those with health coverage and waste taxpayers' money administering the new requirement.
NEWS
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
CHICAGO -- When Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich signed it last winter, the All Kids program was heralded as the nation's most ambitious plan to ensure that all children would have access to health insurance, regardless of their immigration status. Now, as the program's benefits began to roll out this week, thousands of families and doctors are wondering whether the broad-reaching effort will live up to its promise. State officials said the legislation is designed to provide medical, dental and vision visits and prescription drug coverage to those age 18 and younger whose working-class families can't afford private insurance but earn too much to qualify for Medicaid.
NEWS
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Health care reform may be dead in Washington, but a growing number of states - under Republicans and Democrats alike - are taking steps to expand medical insurance coverage. Faced with a problem they find increasingly hard to ignore, governors and legislators in at least 20 states have hammered out agreements to expand access to health care by squeezing money from existing health programs and taking other politically difficult steps, including tax increases. In Illinois, Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich is about to sign a bill providing affordable health coverage for uninsured children of working parents.
NEWS
August 21, 2005
A WAVE of excitement washed over congressional Democrats recently when a high-roller lobbyist closely linked to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was indicted in Florida. The allegations against Jack Abramoff have nothing to do with Mr. DeLay, but they added to the impression that investigators pursuing Mr. Abramoff on several fronts are beginning to close in - tainting by association if not directly a Republican leader who has already been admonished by his House colleagues for questionable behavior.
NEWS
By Adam Pertman | February 14, 2005
THE U.S. SURGEON General, Richard H. Carmona, has embarked on an admirable quest. Citing the obvious fact that many diseases are inherited, he has created a national campaign that encourages all American families to learn more about their health histories. To make this important task easier to accomplish, Dr. Carmona's office has created software that all of us can download at no cost to help track medical information about our parents, grandparents and other relatives. And to underscore how serious the surgeon general is about getting us all to act, he designated an annual National Family Health History Day to coincide with Thanksgiving.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2005
Is it true that Baltimore is one of the "fattest" cities in the country? According to Men's Fitness magazine's annual study, Baltimore ranks "25th Fattest" nationally this year. A higher-than-national-average number of Baltimoreans (58.1 percent) are overweight, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control. Not the worst, but certainly not great. When calculating a city's overall health, the study took into account everything from health care (we earned an A-) to TV watching (B)
NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
Angelo Solera sat in a plywood booth in Patterson Park yesterday afternoon behind an arsenal of fact sheets and brochures written in Spanish and English: "Birth Control Choices," "Family Planning Program," "Baltimore Healthcare Access." Solera was one of dozens of vendors with booths at LatinoFest 04 - some selling homemade paella and fried bananas, or ethnic T-shirts and artwork - at the 20-year-old festival celebrating the growing Hispanic community in Baltimore. An estimated 35,000 people attended last year.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Vicki Kemper and Edwin Chen and Vicki Kemper,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2004
YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio - A day after trying to rally the nation behind his Iraq policy, President Bush pivoted back to his domestic agenda yesterday, traveling to this Democratic stronghold to highlight the role of community health centers in caring for the uninsured. In a campaign-style "conversation" at Youngstown State University, Bush promoted neighborhood clinics, a centerpiece of his health care agenda, as a primary way to expand access to medical services. He hailed the thousands of community health centers in the country as "a safety net" that provides primary care to those without insurance.
NEWS
November 22, 2003
Treat access to health care as a basic right At the recent health care summit sponsored by the General Assembly, the core issue was that in one of the wealthiest states in the wealthiest, most technologically advanced nation in the world, the number of people without health insurance has risen to more than 600,000 (the number is about 44 million nationwide) ("Ehrlich plans limited health reform in '04," Nov. 13). Virtually every industrialized country in the world has found a solution to this problem because they recognize two things.
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