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NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | April 14, 1991
Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, the West Virginia Democrat who is emerging as the leading congressional spokesman on health care matters, was in a sentimental mood when he recently visited the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.This was, after all, the school which his famous grandfather had bankrolled 75 years ago to the tune of $267,000 -- a handsome sum indeed for the time.But instead of bringing money, Mr. Rockefeller could only bring a sober warning: "We have got to do something immediately to stop the explosion of health care costs in the United States."
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NEWS
July 22, 2014
I would like to clarify some issues around the Hobby Lobby case that have been misrepresented in the extreme. Under the ruling it may be true that an employer may opt not to provide coverage for four specific types of birth control. But the employer has no control over what doctor you see or what you discuss, and doctor visits are covered by insurance regardless of what an employer says. All of these drugs are available at all pharmacies. You may have to pay full price for it as it will not be an option for co-pay.
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NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
Improving America's health care system to eliminate what are seen as inequities and disparities between blacks and whites has been urged by civil rights advocates and health care officials."
NEWS
November 11, 2013
Ask anyone who has been diagnosed with a mental illness or addiction or sought treatment for a family member or friend with such a condition, getting proper medical care can be a huge challenge. Bad enough that those with an illness may themselves resist treatment, but getting health insurance companies to pay for it can be exceedingly difficult in a world of pre-authorizations, caps on benefits, in-network requirements and other maddening restrictions. That's why last week's publication of final rules implementing a 2008 law guaranteeing parity — that mental health care will be treated by insurers as equivalent to other medical treatments — is so groundbreaking and important.
NEWS
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Health care reform may be dead in Washington, but a growing number of states - under Republicans and Democrats alike - are taking steps to expand medical insurance coverage. Faced with a problem they find increasingly hard to ignore, governors and legislators in at least 20 states have hammered out agreements to expand access to health care by squeezing money from existing health programs and taking other politically difficult steps, including tax increases. In Illinois, Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich is about to sign a bill providing affordable health coverage for uninsured children of working parents.
NEWS
June 7, 2003
The state's top health official recently suggested that Maryland is working on a plan to extend basic health care benefits to all citizens. What, if anything, should the state do to ensure everyone has access to health care? We are looking for 200 words or less; the deadline for responses is June 23. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration has received another recommendation to broaden the nation's health-care system to protect the uninsured poor.Various health policy experts estimated that the cost to the federal government would be at least $4 billion a year. Medicaid, a state-federal program, already finances health care for 27 million poor Americans.A report drafted for an advisory panel appointed by the administration is recommending that Medicaid be expanded to cover doctors' services and hospital care for an estimated 10 million people below the poverty level who have no insurance.
FEATURES
February 23, 1993
The Women's Law Center is sponsoring an all-day conference exploring women's health care issues Saturday at Goucher College in Towson."The Medical Gender Gap and the Crisis in Women's Health Care: Medical, Legal and Political Issues" will bring together physicians, public policy researchers, sociologists, epidemiologists and attorneys to discuss such issues as fighting for research money, breast implants and access to health care.Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen Health Research Group and author of "Women's Health Alert," will deliver the keynote speech at 9 a.m. Other participants include Grant Bagley from the Food and Drug Administration; Frances Visco, president of the National Breast Cancer Coalition; Devra Davis, a scholar from the National Academy of Sciences; and Trudy Bush, an epidemiology professor at Johns Hopkins' School of Hygiene and Public Health who is helping run clinical trials to study the effects of hormone replacement therapy.
NEWS
May 3, 1996
AS MILLIONS of working Americans already know, having a job does not mean having access to health care. A new survey by the Bethesda-based Center for Health Affairs has found that some 41 million Americans, mostly middle class, are unable to obtain medical care for at least one important service.Unlike many such surveys, this one went beyond basic questions about the ability to see a doctor to include other essential services like surgery, dental care, eyeglasses, prescription drugs or mental health treatment.
NEWS
August 21, 2005
A WAVE of excitement washed over congressional Democrats recently when a high-roller lobbyist closely linked to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay was indicted in Florida. The allegations against Jack Abramoff have nothing to do with Mr. DeLay, but they added to the impression that investigators pursuing Mr. Abramoff on several fronts are beginning to close in - tainting by association if not directly a Republican leader who has already been admonished by his House colleagues for questionable behavior.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 19, 2012
The federal government has awarded Maryland $36.5 million for its success at getting children enrolled in government subsidized health programs. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said Wednesday that Maryland was among 23 states that was awarded nearly $306 million in performance bonuses for enrolling children into Medicaid and the Children's Health Program. States qualify for bonuses by showing they have simplified the process of enrolling in the programs. They must also meeet goals of enrolling children living in the lowest income levels.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
By voting to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.erased concerns that the Supreme Court had become captive to a political rather than a legal agenda. As he promised to do during his confirmation hearings, Chief Justice Roberts in his decision released today crafted a narrow ruling that showed due deference to the other branches of government. In fact, his view of the most controversial element of the law, the so-called individual mandate - a requirement that individuals purchase health insurance or pay a penalty - cut through the political spin of Democrats in Congress and President Barack Obama.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's administration is proposing to establish a number of health enterprise zones to address the glaring health disparities along racial and class lines that end lives prematurely and cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars a year in additional medical costs. This is a promising idea that deserves further exploration; the need is obvious, the disparities are well-documented and a plan to test the program's effectiveness through a series of pilot projects offers an affordable, relatively low-risk approach to the problem.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
Felix and Leticia Rengel of Oakland Mills have been going without health insurance, praying that their mild diabetes gets no worse and that nothing else goes wrong. They both work, but don't make enough to be able to afford health coverage, they said. "As you get up in age, you wonder what's going to happen if you have an emergency," said Leticia, 56, a visual therapist, as she sat next to Felix, 61, who is a courier. The Rengels were at the east Columbia library, waiting for the ceremonial launch of the Healthy Howard health care access plan to conclude so the enrollment process could begin.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2008
Maryland has a lower percentage of children living in poverty than any other state, but, despite its wealth, ranks only 19th in the nation in the well-being of its children, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2008 Kids Count Data Book released yesterday. That gap is the fourth-largest in the nation. Most notably, 9.1 percent of Maryland babies had a low birth weight - and the state ranked 39th nationwide on this measure based on 2005 data. In 2000, the share of babies with a low birth weight was 8.6 percent.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
The repeat callers to Baltimore's 911 ambulance dispatch system are a chronic problem in search of a solution. And the city's health commissioner may have come up with one. As far as pilot projects go, Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein's proposal to enlist a health care advocacy group to assess the medical needs of these repeat callers and get them help through traditional means falls into the category of, "Why didn't anyone think of this sooner?" It offers the possibility of resolving the problem to the benefit of both the system and individuals in need of care.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | April 5, 2008
Johns Hopkins officials restored full access yesterday to a reproductive health Web site funded by the government, after learning that searches containing the word "abortion" were being intentionally restricted and that thousands of studies were being hidden from easy view. The change came after librarians and women's health advocates flooded the blogosphere - and e-mail boxes at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health - with complaints of censorship. They became concerned after one research librarian was told the action was not a mistake - with the implication that it could be related to Bush administration rules restricting dissemination of information about abortions in foreign countries.
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