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June 17, 2011
Editor: It is with dismay that I read your June 15 editorial "Cutting Through," concerning the proposed emergency- only connection between Tollgate Village and Bel Air Acres Your statement "Such a link, no doubt, would turn into a shortcut, possibly an irritating one," completely misses the truth and focal point of the issue, namely that the Harford County government, the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company, other emergency groups and the overwhelming...
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Using a daughter's compelling testimonial and a rally in Annapolis, Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan is fighting rival Anthony G. Brown's attempt to persuade voters that Hogan would take the state backward on such matters as abortion and birth control Hogan's counteroffensive comes after a sustained ad blitz in which Brown's campaign and its allies seek to portray Hogan as a closet right-wing extremist who would roll back the clock...
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NEWS
June 20, 2010
There's nothing unusual about House Speaker Michael E. Busch's efforts to solicit corporate sponsorships for the National Speakers Conference he's hosting in Annapolis this weekend, which will treat some of the most influential members of 30 state legislatures to a crab feast, Chesapeake cruise, golf and a fireworks display at Fort McHenry. And that's the problem. The Washington Post's John Wagner reported Wednesday that corporate sponsors, companies with business before Maryland's legislature and those of other states, are footing the tab to the tune of more than $500,000.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A federal judge ruled this week that owners of multiple Harford County properties - where portions of a 21-mile underground gas pipeline are being installed under an eminent domain claim - cannot fully access funds set aside by the gas company as a form of collateral until a final determination is made at trial on compensation. Columbia Gas Transmission LLC was granted access to the properties in June to begin installing a back-up gas line between Owings Mills and Fallston under condition that it file a cash bond payment of $231,675 to the court, according to court records.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 31, 2013
You're never far from water in Maryland, with the Chesapeake Bay nearly bisecting the state. Yet for all that, there's a surprising shortage of places where people can launch a boat, cast a fishing line or wade in. A coalition of recreational enthusiasts, small businesses, local governments and civic and nonprofit groups hopes to change that.  They've launched a " Freedom to Float " campaign, seeking to capitalize on the release this week of...
NEWS
April 18, 2013
As a financial services representative and small business owner, I see firsthand the challenges many Hispanic Americans in our community face in accessing affordable ways to get retirement savings help. More than 60 percent of Hispanic workers don't have access to an employee-sponsored retirement plan, which is why opening an Individual Retirement Account is important. The Hispanic American communities that we live and work in have an urgent need for retirement saving advice and products.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
The National Commission on AIDS has suggested that addicts be given access to needles, a move the federal advisory group hopes would stop the spread of AIDS. In Baltimore, one of four addicts are infected with the HIV virus, which is transmitted by sharing dirty needles or through sexual contact.The Evening Sun would like your opinion on the recommendation. Should addicts be given access to sterile needles? Do you think it would prevent the spread of the disease? Do you think it would promote drug abuse?
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
For years Ellicott City traffic ticket attorney David H. Weinstein happily relied on a clever system to drum up business. When he had a client heading to court, he'd use a public terminal to pull up the names of every other defendant who would be in court at the same time and mail them postcards offering his services. But a rule change designed to guard against the use of court records for identity theft has led officials to shut off access to the terminals. Officials are directing Weinstein and other members of the public to the case search website, where personal information is more tightly controlled.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A federal judge ruled this week that owners of multiple Harford County properties - where portions of a 21-mile underground gas pipeline are being installed under an eminent domain claim - cannot fully access funds set aside by the gas company as a form of collateral until a final determination is made at trial on compensation. Columbia Gas Transmission LLC was granted access to the properties in June to begin installing a back-up gas line between Owings Mills and Fallston under condition that it file a cash bond payment of $231,675 to the court, according to court records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Since his golf outing with Tiger Woods, President Obama has been battling with the press over access. And things only look to get more contentious this week as we move toward sequester Friday. Here's a look at a wide-ranging discussion of the issues involved that aired Sunday on CNN's "Reliable Sources" with host Howie Kurtz. The first video has me engaged with longtime CBS White House correspondent Bill Plante, and Julie Mason, host of "Press Pool" weekdays on the POTUS channel (124)
NEWS
September 23, 2014
There's simply no excuse for the Secret Service to have allowed an apparently deranged man to vault over the White House fence on Friday then sprint across the lawn and actually enter the president's residence through an unlocked door before he was tackled and apprehended. Heads should roll for a breach of security of this magnitude at what ought to be one of the country's most heavily guarded facilities. But it shouldn't come at the expense of the public's access to a historic site that symbolizes the nation's tradition of open governance and accountability to the citizens it serves.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
About 30,000 low-income Marylanders, half of them in the Baltimore region, have signed up for $10-a-month Internet service, Comcast officials said Monday as they promoted broadened access to the program, now in its fourth year. The Philadelphia-based cable service provider revealed the figures at an event at Baltimore's Digital Harbor Foundation, an after-school program it is working with to help close the digital divide. Comcast is giving the foundation free Internet service and donated more than 50 laptops to students at the event, attended by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 21, 2014
My mother was a child abuser. I was, too. In fact, growing up, pretty much every parent I knew abused their kids. Or so many of Adrian Peterson's critics would have you believe. Mr. Peterson, a star of the Minnesota Vikings, was arrested recently for child abuse after hitting his 4-year-old son with a switch. A "switch," for those who don't know, is a long twig. I should know, having been on the receiving end of quite a few. When no switch was available, mom was also known to employ a section of the orange plastic track from my Hot Wheels.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
A recent raid at a Catonsville apartment complex has raised concerns that federal immigration agents are using Maryland motor vehicle data to locate illegal immigrants, potentially undermining a state initiative to ensure that drivers are ready for the road regardless of their citizenship status. Residents of the Melvin Park Apartments said Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents pulled over several vehicles within a few blocks of the complex last month and asked for the registered owners by name.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
In what on the surface seems like a remarkable turnaround, a number of conservative Republican Senate candidates this year are supporting a proposal to expand access to birth control by making it available without a prescription as an over-the-counter medication. Wider access to birth control traditionally has been a Democratic issue, so Republicans' sudden embrace of it seems almost too good to be true. Unfortunately, it is. This year four GOP Senate candidates in close races against Democratic incumbents have announced their support for over-the-counter access to birth control: Cory Gardener of Colorado; Thom Tillis of North Carolina; Ed Gillespie of Virgina and Mike McFadden of Minnesota.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
I agree that Maryland's recently proposed rules regarding access to medical marijuana are overly restrictive ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Maryland policymakers are missing an opportunity to save lives. Baltimore, for example, has the highest rate of heroin addiction in the country. New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that states with legal access to medical marijuana have a 25 percent lower rate of opioid overdose deaths than states that prohibit marijuana.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 19, 2012
The federal government has awarded Maryland $36.5 million for its success at getting children enrolled in government subsidized health programs. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said Wednesday that Maryland was among 23 states that was awarded nearly $306 million in performance bonuses for enrolling children into Medicaid and the Children's Health Program. States qualify for bonuses by showing they have simplified the process of enrolling in the programs. They must also meeet goals of enrolling children living in the lowest income levels.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
Letter writer Anita L. Feith writes that it's hard to believe that in 2012 access to contraception is in the spotlight of a national debate ("Standing up for contraception," Feb. 23). One reason Ms. Feith probably finds this hard to believe is because it isn't true. There is no national debate about whether to restrict access to contraception. The debate is about whether contraception should be paid for in the form of handouts from insurance companies or the government, both of which would pass along the cost to all consumers.
NEWS
By Michael J. Wilson | September 1, 2014
Fifty years ago this week, the Food Stamp Act of 1964 was signed into law. The goal was to ensure that those of us with the least would not be without food. In the ensuing decades, the program adapted to cultural, economic and technological changes and has provided millions of people with better nutrition. Today, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, the modern incarnation of food stamps) remains our nation's most effective tool in the fight against hunger. The Food Supplement Program (FSP, Maryland's name for SNAP)
NEWS
August 27, 2014
A state commission meeting this week to draft rules governing access to medical marijuana by patients and physicians has left advocates for the drug's therapeutic use wondering whether it will ever become available to those who need it. The commissioners need to balance the scientific and medical issues raised by medical marijuana against the legal constraints imposed by state and federal statutes. But in trying to walk a fine line between the two, the panel appears to have crafted rules that in some instances are so restrictive that many patients with illnesses that could be treated with the drug may never be able to get it. That would defeat the whole purpose of Maryland's medical marijuana law, which has already been delayed once since its passage in 2013.
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