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Acceptance Speech

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NEWS
August 2, 2000
The time was August 1988, the occasion the Republican National Convention in New Orleans, the speaker Vice President George H. W. Bush, the party's nominee for president. His acceptance speech - excerpted here - helped introduce themes that would aid his campaign and also later haunt him - the "read my lips" pledge of no new taxes, for example. It also helped prepare the ideological ground for this year's campaign by his son, George W. Bush. The elder Bush talks of compassion, family and life in Texas - a preview, perhaps, of remarks by the younger Bush, who takes the stage in Philadelphia tomorrow night to deliver an acceptance speech of his own. I've come to this hall to tell you, and to tell America: tonight is the night.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 4, 2012
Barack Obama has given some great speeches since his national debut as the keynote speaker at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. Don't expect his speech Thursday night in Charlotte to be one of them. This is not a moment to announce his arrival on the national political scene. Nor will this speech be anything like the Philadelphia speech of May 2008, where he explained how racial identity shaped his life and the fate of the nation. Because asking to be returned to the Oval Office for a second term is a task quite different from asking for the first four years, Thursday's speech may not even look much like Mr. Obama's acceptance speech four years ago at Denver's Invesco Field.
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NEWS
By RICHARD E. VATZ & LEE S. WEINBERG | August 19, 1992
Texas Republican Chairman Fred Meyer says that President Bushcan turn around the election through a great acceptance speech at the Republican convention in Houston tomorrow night.Mr. Meyer exaggerates the potential of acceptance speeches; by themselves, they rarely transform elections.Still, presidential acceptance speeches often help trigger a convention ''bounce''-- the immediate, but often short-lived, rise in the candidate's polls following a national convention. George Bush's rousing acceptance speech in 1988 helped smother Michael Dukakis' 1988 bounce, which itself was largely a result of a surprisingly effective acceptance speech.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
There's an old joke about two hikers in the woods encountering an angry bear. When one turns to run, the other warns that he's not fast enough to outrun their ferocious adversary. "I only have to outrun you," the quicker-thinking hiker responds. And so it is with the candidacy of Mitt Romney, whose acceptance speech Thursday at the Republican National Convention may not have been the touchdown the pundits claimed he needed but was surely what his handlers wanted, playing up both the candidate's strength (management experience)
NEWS
August 30, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's acceptance speech last night was loaded with unforeseen nuances as he stuck by the centrist, balanced-budget, welfare reform, families-first agenda urged on him by newly disgraced political guru, Dick Morris, the object of a sex scandal that left party loyalists dismayed but apparently still confident of their candidate's survivalist instincts.Despite this cloud over an otherwise exuberant Democratic National Convention, Mr. Clinton was at his oratorical best as he urged supporters to "build a bridge to the 21st century."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- Tonight Bob Dole will get the chance to tell millions of Americans who he is, how he thinks and what he wants for the country. He's fretting over every word.Months of work on his nearly one-hour speech accepting the Republican presidential nomination ended with Dole crashing on deadline. The original speech writer left town Tuesday night after four Dole aides were brought in to rewrite the ending.The last-minute reworking is troubling to some in the Dole camp, but is not unexpected.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- Vowing that "the best is yet to come," Bill Clinton gained his party's nomination last night for a second term as president.Clinton, the first Democratic president in more than half a century to gain renomination without opposition, made his triumphant entry into the convention city after a four-day railroad jaunt across the Midwest.Saying he did not wish to upstage his own acceptance speech to the convention this evening, Clinton told a welcoming rally at a Chicago college ball field: "Just let's say the best is yet to come, the best days of America, the best days of the Clinton-Gore administration, the best days of our efforts together, to lift up our country and move forward."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 26, 2012
The press are supposed to be non-partisan and used to all this, but every once in a while... When Meryl Streep was announced as the (somewhat) surprise winner of the Best Actress Oscar, the journalists here assembled gasped, applauded and were pretty darn happy. Streep has been so good for so long, it's nice to see her recognized once again. And her acceptance speech was both a stitch, and heartfelt.  
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
I like Gordon Ramsay, the angry chef who's in love with a certain expletive. I know that as a mean and rude guy, he embodies the worst of reality TV. Furthermore, his persona is totally at odds with my own commitment to civility. But that said, he is also one of the only figures on TV who insists on all-out effort, personal responsibility and excellence from the food-service workers and restaurant owners he encounters on Kitchen Nightmares. We could use more of that, and not just in the world of food.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
There's an old joke about two hikers in the woods encountering an angry bear. When one turns to run, the other warns that he's not fast enough to outrun their ferocious adversary. "I only have to outrun you," the quicker-thinking hiker responds. And so it is with the candidacy of Mitt Romney, whose acceptance speech Thursday at the Republican National Convention may not have been the touchdown the pundits claimed he needed but was surely what his handlers wanted, playing up both the candidate's strength (management experience)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 26, 2012
The press are supposed to be non-partisan and used to all this, but every once in a while... When Meryl Streep was announced as the (somewhat) surprise winner of the Best Actress Oscar, the journalists here assembled gasped, applauded and were pretty darn happy. Streep has been so good for so long, it's nice to see her recognized once again. And her acceptance speech was both a stitch, and heartfelt.  
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | July 12, 2010
Thirty years ago this week, former California governor Ronald Reagan delivered his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in Detroit. The moment signaled an important pivot in modern American politics. Some references made by Mr. Reagan — who that November easily unseated incumbent Democratic President Jimmy Carter — are outdated today. But parts of his script are so timeless, one can easily imagine them coming from the 2008 Denver acceptance speech delivered by Barack Obama, whose election has been described as bringing the Reagan political era to a close.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
I like Gordon Ramsay, the angry chef who's in love with a certain expletive. I know that as a mean and rude guy, he embodies the worst of reality TV. Furthermore, his persona is totally at odds with my own commitment to civility. But that said, he is also one of the only figures on TV who insists on all-out effort, personal responsibility and excellence from the food-service workers and restaurant owners he encounters on Kitchen Nightmares. We could use more of that, and not just in the world of food.
NEWS
By STEVE JOHNSON and STEVE JOHNSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
Trying to draw lessons from the Webby Awards given out last week for one organization's idea of what's best on the Internet, you mostly come away impressed at the greatest awards-show gimmick ever: Winners' acceptance speeches are limited to five words. Five words. Not one more. So last year, Al Gore, picking up a lifetime-achievement award from the Webby-dispensing group known as the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences, said, "Please don't recount this vote." This year, Arianna Huffington, accepting the best political blog award for her year-old Huffington Post site, said, "Darlings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | February 20, 2005
Hanging around backstage at the Academy Awards for 10 years, you pick up a few things. And, if you're a writer, you put them in a book, which is what Steve Pond has done in The Big Show: High Times and Dirty Dealings Backstage at the Academy Awards. Pond, originally granted permission to be a fly on Oscar's wall 10 years ago for a story for Premiere magazine, has been backstage at every Academy Awards since 1995. With this year's ceremonies only a week away, he agreed to answer some questions about what goes on behind the scenes of the movie industry's biggest night.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 6, 2004
NEW YORK - With President Bush's nomination acceptance speech behind him, will he move on from the drumbeat convention reminder that Sept. 11, 2001, made him a wartime president to details of what he would do with another four years in the presidency? In the lead-up to the convention here, Mr. Bush and his surrogates spent much of their time questioning Sen. John Kerry's qualifications for the job even as his strategists promised that he would use the convention to spell out his intentions for a second term.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - George W. Bush is preparing to accept the Republican Party's presidential nomination with one object in mind - to wipe away with his speech tonight whatever doubts there may still be about whether he has the stature and gravitas for the office. The Texas governor is presiding over a party with no significant divisions and, if the opinion polls are accurate, running well ahead of his Democratic opponent, Vice President Al Gore. But he is still an unknown or vaguely known leader to most of the tens of millions who will see him on their television screens tonight.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | July 14, 1992
NEW YORK -- Democrats from Bill Clinton on down are trying to make over his besmirched image, taking advantage of the convention spotlight to emphasize his humble beginnings in Hope, Ark.In his only campaign appearance yesterday, Mr. Clinton noted he "grew up not in the best of circumstances.""My mother was widowed before I was born, my family was poor when I was little. I was able to work my way through college and law school, and I know what it's like not to have enough money to get along on," he told an audience at a Manhattan social service center.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 28, 2004
WASHINGTON - The air certainly went out fast from that trial balloon sent up by Sen. John Kerry's campaign suggesting he might not formally accept the Democratic nomination at the party's convention in Boston in late July. Pressure from his hometown, home state and convention planners quickly caused Mr. Kerry to find new virtues in making his nomination speech as tradition demands in the convention hall. "Boston," as he put it, "is the place where America's freedom began, and it's where I want the journey to the Democratic nomination to be completed."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | September 8, 2000
CLEVELAND -- In his acceptance speech last month, Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore told his party's national convention he knew many people thought he was too serious, but that running for president was serious business. Continuing to make a virtue out of his seriousness, just as he did in that acceptance speech, the vice president here the other day unveiled a 191-page economic plan for a Gore presidency that was pointedly heavy on specifics. In the heart of the old Rust Belt, Mr. Gore accompanied the release of his plan, called "Prosperity for America's Families," with a speech in which he reminded his listeners again and again that he was throwing a full blueprint at them to examine and make up their own minds.
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