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NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Jasper R. Clay Jr.'s deck furniture now includes an Acura Legend, the back wall of his garage and a kitchen sink.Mr. Clay of Columbia's Wilde Lake village plowed through his garage -- which also doubled as a kitchen storage area -- Sunday evening when his 1990 Legend suddenly accelerated as he pulled into his driveway, he said.He was on his way to the supermarket when he remembered he forgot something in the house and returned home."It's one of those freak things," said Mr. Clay, a 62-year-old federal executive.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014
If increasingly extreme weather events around the world weren't alarming enough, the latest monitoring by the World Meteorological Organization shows last year was the worst ever for rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their report released Tuesday demonstrates why efforts to curb climate change deserve to be a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. The WMO tracks not just the greenhouse gases emitted by power plants, motor vehicles, factories and other major contributors but what the net effect is on the atmosphere since a certain amount of carbon dioxide is naturally absorbed by plants and oceans.
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BUSINESS
By Tribune Newspapers | January 27, 2010
Toyota Motor Corp. has taken the unprecedented step of halting sales and production of eight models, including the top-selling Camry and Corolla, because their accelerator pedals can stick and cause runaway acceleration. Toyota sent an e-mail to its roughly 1,200 U.S. dealers late Tuesday, asking them to immediately stop selling the vehicles. In addition, it told them to refrain from selling certain used versions of the same models. At the same time, Toyota said it is halting production of the models in five assembly lines in the U.S. and Canada, effective Monday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
In the 60 seconds before his tractor-trailer smashed into two vehicles on the Bay Bridge last summer, propelling one into the water below, Gabor Lovasz accelerated from 8 mph to 51 mph. In its final report on the incident, the National Transportation Safety Board attributed the accident to Lovasz's "inattention" as well as his "unfamiliarity with the area and lack of knowledge that traffic routinely slows on the eastbound span of the bridge....
BUSINESS
By McClatchy Newspapers | February 23, 2010
Federal prosecutors have launched a criminal investigation into Toyota's safety troubles, the Japanese automaker confirmed Monday, as the company's leadership braces for tough questions in congressional hearings this week about its recent spate of recalls. Toyota officials said the company on Feb. 8 received a subpoena from a federal grand jury in New York requesting documents related to unintended acceleration of some Toyota vehicles and the braking system of its popular Prius hybrid.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Sinai Health System announced yesterday that it will open athletic training and fitness centers to be called Cal Ripken, Jr. Sport Acceleration.The first of the centers is to open in the spring at the Columbia 100 Center in Howard County. Another is planned for Fairfax County in Northern Virginia in early 1999, with a third likely to follow in a few years.The centers are not usual health clubs but designed to offer six- to eight-week programs to athletes -- most often, those in high school or middle school -- designed to make them run faster, jump higher and throw harder.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
After three years of training athletes to run faster and jump higher, the Cal Ripken Jr. Sports Acceleration Center will close this month, a spokesman for Ripken and the center said. Ripken, who owns the center, likely will re-deploy elsewhere, possibly in the baseball complex he is building in Aberdeen, the spokesman said. "We made the decision to pull in the concept," John C. Maroon said. "We wanted to do it so we can apply certain aspects of it down the road. Cal very much liked the acceleration program and how it worked with kids, and how it fit in with our youth focus."
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Orioles All-Star Cal Ripken Jr. has assumed ownership from partner LifeBridge Health of a Columbia athletic training center that bears his name, the Cal Ripken Jr. Sports Acceleration Center.Ripken intends to expand the center, change its name and add programs and outlets. Eventually the operation, which provides advanced training for amateur and professional athletes, could expand nationwide, said Ira Rainess, president of the center and head of Ripken's commercial operations."People throughout the country have tried to find a formula that works in this niche market; I think we have found the right model," Rainess said.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | March 13, 2005
CAUGHT BETWEEN salary cap purgatory and a running back he can't satisfy, Indianapolis Colts president Bill Polian last week acknowledged that he would listen to trade offers for three-time Pro Bowl player Edgerrin James. The Seattle Seahawks followed suit by placing their Pro Bowl running back, Shaun Alexander, on the trading block as well. It's becoming a crowded place, that trading block. Already dangling are cornerbacks Patrick Surtain (Miami Dolphins) and Charles Woodson (Oakland Raiders)
SPORTS
By Jack Craig and Jack Craig,Boston Globe | March 19, 1991
NBC analyst O.J. Simpson absorbed sharp criticism last January when he warned that Bo Jackson's career was in jeopardy after Jackson was injured in the Raiders-Bengals playoff game. Simpson was vindicated yesterday when the Kansas City Royals said they were waiving the two-sport star.What did Simpson alone know?"People said it was a hip pointer, but I had had those; they only come from a real jolt, such as a helmet hitting the spot," Simpson said last night. "I saw him go down, and saw the film.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Maryland regulators said Wednesday that they will allow Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to charge gas customers a monthly fee to pick up the pace of replacing aging pipes - the first such surcharge in the state. The surcharge will start at about 32 cents a month for residential customers this year, increasing annually until it caps out at $2 a month in 2017 and 2018. Business customers would pay different amounts, with almost all starting at $1.58 a month and topping out at $9.75 monthly.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Few companies watch their bottom line with more anxiety than startup firms, but the ones who want to move into a new business accelerator in Columbia will need to think beyond revenue and expenses. Howard County's Conscious Venture Lab is on the hunt for fledgling companies practicing a form of what's often called responsible or sustainable capitalism - businesses with aims that include but aren't limited to profits. The accelerator's organizers want firms that consider not just shareholders in their decisions but also a broad range of other "stakeholders" such as employees, suppliers and the environment.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
Justin Benedik played nearly every sport he could imagine during his youth in Calvert County. His main focus was soccer, but the 2004 Patuxent graduate also dabbled in football, tennis, golf, lacrosse and "almost everything my parents could bring me to without having any time left. " But it wasn't until his senior year at Maryland that Benedik was introduced to wushu, the sport that changed his life. Benedik attended a demonstration staged by the TerpWushu club in the grand ballroom of the Stamp Student Union and was immediately taken by the sport's dizzying combination of Chinese martial arts, acrobatics and gymnastics.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Baltimore's leaders are to be commended for their efforts to steadily reduce crime, improve student test scores and graduation rates, and lower property taxes. Such steps are absolutely critical to meeting Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of reversing Baltimore's decades-long decline and drawing 10,000 new families to the city over a 10-year period. Yet even if all those worthy goals are achieved, no outsider - or resident - will think of Baltimore as a truly great metropolis (let alone the "Greatest City on Earth," as those bus benches proclaim)
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Deborah Seymour lives in Federal Hill. But working at Laureate Education Inc. and shopping and dining in Harbor East means much of her life happens on the other side of the harbor. "Between the restaurants and the retail, it is a place where you can spend a lot of time," she said. "It has become a neighborhood that you just don't leave after work. It has become a destination. " The growth along the brick-paved sidewalks has been accelerating, turning Harbor East into the city's hottest shopping destination.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE RECORD | April 10, 2013
Over the next several weeks in Aberdeen, a dozen and a half homes along Route 22 will be demolished to make way for the road to be widened. No doubt more than a few lives were disrupted when the Maryland State Highway Administration began acquiring property to make way for a wider roadway, but protections are in place to ensure property owners are adequately compensated even as the interests of taxpayers – those of us paying for those houses –...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 30, 2006
Carl Cyrus Clark, an internationally known expert on human acceleration and crash protection whose research contributed significantly to the development of air bags for automobiles and airplanes, died of a heart attack Thursday at his summer home in Thetford, Vt. The longtime Catonsville resident was 82. "The bottom line in discussing Carl Clark is that people are safer because of his work. He did more for humanity than 99.9 percent of the world's scientists," consumer advocate Ralph Nader said yesterday.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
HERSHEY, Pa. -- It was not your typical physics class."WE'RE GOING TO DIE!!" bellowed Eric Lazerow, 11, with a mixture of terror and relish, as Hershey Park's Trailblazer roller coaster plummeted, swerved and spiraled at dizzying speeds.The sixth-grader joined the first Maryland Science Center field trip to study the physics of amusement park rides, part of an effort to interest youths in science. He was supposed to be looking at a lead-weight and rubber-band contraption he built to measure vertical acceleration, or G-forces.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
What a sad time for Marylanders. They are going to be subjected to a regressive gas tax that will have an automatic tax accelerator tied to the Consumer Price Index. It is unfair to the gas station owners who are operating along the borders of our state. They will lose business as people will migrate to pay less at the pump in surrounding states. The Transportation Trust Fund was created in 1971 to provide funding for a transportation network from the 23.5 cents per gallon tax. Over the years, the trust fund has been raided by the governor by over $1 billion dollars from the Highway User funds earmarked for local governments to improve roads.Those funds will never be repaid.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
When Maryland utilities replace their gas pipelines, customers have had to fork out extra money afterward — not during. But that's poised to change. Both chambers of Maryland's General Assembly, citing safety concerns, approved measures this month that would make it easier for utilities to add infrastructure surcharges of up to $2 a month to natural-gas customers' bills. It's the latest push in a tug of war over the best and fairest way to replace the nation's aging utility infrastructure, the price tag for which has been estimated in the trillions of dollars.
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