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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Attorneys for a Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate argued Monday that the academy's superintendent was pressured to prosecute the case — one of several claims the legal team is making in an effort to have the case dismissed. Midshipman Joshua Tate is awaiting trial on charges of aggravated sexual assault and making false statements, stemming from an alleged assault at an April 2012 off-campus party. The case has gained national attention, and at a motions hearing in military court at the Washington Navy Yard, Tate's attorneys said academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller was influenced by military and political pressure when he made the decision to prosecute the midshipman.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The new superintendent of the Naval Academy said Thursday that the institution is a national leader in confronting sexual assault and sexual harassment among students, and should be helping other schools tackle what he described as a widespread problem. The Naval Academy has drawn national attention for the alleged assault of a female midshipman at a party in Annapolis and the subsequent investigation of three members of the Navy football team. The prosecution came amid a growing public focus on sexual assaults both in the military and on college campuses.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1995
The admiral who was in charge of the Naval Academy during the largest cheating scandal in the school's history will retire in November, without a promotion or the command of a fleet."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Adm. Charles R. Larson, the onetime commander-in-chief of military forces in the Pacific who became superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy to restore discipline and morale after his alma mater had been rocked by the largest cheating scandal in its history, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis. He was 77. Admiral Larson's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Cmdr. Wesley Huey, a faculty member at the academy. Commander Huey said the four-star admiral had been diagnosed with leukemia two years ago. "Admiral Larson's death is a great loss for the Navy family and the U.S. Naval Academy," said Vice Admiral Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr., who took over as the academy's superintendent Wednesday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, whose fast rise in the Navy stalled when he presided over the Naval Academy during its largest cheating scandal, has been assigned to a new Pentagon post that will chart the future of the Navy and Marine Corps.The 52-year-old academy superintendent yesterday received his orders to become director of the Navy's roles and missions study group, under the chief of naval operations.The admiral will oversee a staff of 10 that will study will review the types of military operations that may be required in the post Cold War era."
NEWS
October 10, 1994
James Hill, 75, a British film director whose movies included "Born Free" and a remake of "Black Beauty," died yesterday. The cause was not immediately known. Mr. Hill's best-known film was "Born Free," the story of a game warden in Kenya, George Adamson, and his wife, Joy, who reared three lion cubs. Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers starred in the 1966 release. Other films included "A Study in Terror" in 1965 and the 1971 version of "Black Beauty."William Renwick Smedberg III, 92, a retired vice admiral and former Naval Academy superintendent, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday in Falls Church, Va. Admiral Smedberg, who retired in 1964, was academy superintendent from 1956 to 1958.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
The Naval Academy Women's Club May Installation Luncheon will take place at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Buchanan House, home of the U.S. Naval Academy superintendent.At the luncheon, 24 $1,000 scholarships will be given to 15 children of U.S. Navy and Marine officers, seven children of Naval Academy faculty and staff, and two children of enlisted personnel from the Naval Station.Information: 849-8315 or 263-7199.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
The Navy reserves its Distinguished Service Medal, the fourth-highest prize it offers, for "exceptional performance of duty, clearly above that normally expected."One has to wonder what it considers "exceptional performance of duty." This week it gave the prize to Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, whose watch as Naval Academy superintendent was marred by the biggest cheating scandal in academy history and criticism over the half-hearted way he handled it.The Navy's behavior makes no sense.On the one hand, Navy top brass have sent unmistakable signals that they are not impressed with Admiral Lynch.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
When two Naval Academy midshipmen handed in identical naval history term papers, instructor Jessica Huckabey turned the pair in to the academy's honor board and expected both would be expelled. Two years later, the students, both starting football players, have not been expelled, even though the academy's faculty handbook states that cheating will "normally result in separation" from the school. And neither was suspended from the team, despite the academy's history of suspending other athletes for similar offenses.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun Reporter | February 27, 2007
An Annapolis alderwoman and the Anne Arundel chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People stepped forward yesterday in support of Lamar Owens Jr., the Navy midshipman recommended for expulsion after being acquitted of rape charges but convicted of two lesser counts. Classie G. Hoyle introduced a non-binding resolution asking that the Naval Academy grant Owens his degree and commission. The alderwoman said she hopes that Navy Assistant Secretary William Navas will take it under consideration as he decides the fate of Owens, whose trial ended in July.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A former Naval Academy football player who is accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman is moving toward a court-martial next month, officials said Tuesday. Jason Ehrenberg, a civilian attorney for Midshipman Joshua Tate, said the military judge in the case told prosecutors and defense attorneys this week that he planned to deny motions to dismiss the case. "We're going forward," Ehrenberg said. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, has not yet issued his rulings, and a Naval Academy spokesman said it would be improper to comment on a pending case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Attorneys for a Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate argued Monday that the academy's superintendent was pressured to prosecute the case — one of several claims the legal team is making in an effort to have the case dismissed. Midshipman Joshua Tate is awaiting trial on charges of aggravated sexual assault and making false statements, stemming from an alleged assault at an April 2012 off-campus party. The case has gained national attention, and at a motions hearing in military court at the Washington Navy Yard, Tate's attorneys said academy Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller was influenced by military and political pressure when he made the decision to prosecute the midshipman.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The superintendent of the Naval Academy told a military judge Friday that his decision to prosecute a midshipman in a high-profile sexual assault case was not influenced by politicians, public pressure or his military supervisors. Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller spent more than three hours on the stand in a military court at the Washington Navy Yard defending his decision to pursue charges against Midshipman Joshua Tate. He rebutted the contention that the national spotlight on sexual assault in the military — including a pledge from President Barack Obama to root out sexual predators in the service — affected the way he has handled the case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
A lawyer for a Naval Academy midshipman who is the alleged victim of a sexual assault by two fellow classmates is seeking court documents from the academy's superintendent. Attorney Ryan Guilds is seeking all of the motions in the cases against the classmates who are accused in the alleged asault, as well as the transcript of the eight-day preliminary hearing and the report of a military judge who reviewed the case and made recommendations to the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
An attorney for the Naval Academy midshipman who accused three classmates of sexually assaulting her at an off-campus party is asking a federal judge to bar the academy superintendent from deciding whether the case goes to a court-martial. Under the military's justice system, the Naval Academy's superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller, has the final say whether charges will go forward against the three midshipmen. The lawsuit, filed Thursday by Baltimore-based attorney Susan Burke, says the superintendent has a conflict of interest because he doesn't want anything to happen that would harm his or the academy's reputation.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Defense attorneys for three Naval Academy football players accused of sexually assaulting a female midshipman while she was passed out at an Annapolis party last year sought Thursday to raise questions about her credibility and motives. The woman, now a senior at the academy, spent about eight hours on the witness stand Thursday. The preliminary hearing into the alleged incident opened this week at the Washington Navy Yard. She endured seven hours of testimony and cross-examination on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
A Navy panel recommended yesterday that 29 senior midshipmen be expelled for their part in the largest cheating scandal in the 149-year history of the U.S. Naval Academy.Forty-two others were recommended for punishments short of expulsion, while another 35 were exonerated of violating the academy's strict honor concept, which states: "Midshipmen are persons of integrity: They do not lie, cheat or steal."In a related move, the Pentagon will recommend today that the White House appoint Adm. Charles R. Larson, commander in chief of U.S. Pacific Forces and a former academy superintendent, as the next superintendent, replacing Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, who is to complete his tour of duty this summer, a Defense Department source said.
NEWS
February 18, 2007
Vice. Adm. Rodney P. Rempt Occupation Naval Academy superintendent In the news In a memo to Navy Secretary Donald C. Winter, Rempt recommended last week the expulsion of Lamar S. Owens Jr., a former standout quarterback who was acquitted in July of raping a female classmate but found guilty on two lesser charges. Career highlights After his 1966 graduation from the academy, Rempt served aboard several ships before commanding the USS Callaghan, a destroyer, and the USS Bunker Hill, a cruiser.
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