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By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
For more than a year, the director, cameraman, sound technician and helper were a head-turning presence on the grounds of the Naval Academy. And the midshipmen would ask: Now, when's this going to run?The answer is Sunday. And at 8 p.m., many of the 4,000 students trickling back to Annapolis after their post-final exam break will probably be sitting in dormitory ward rooms watching themselves and their classmates -- and their Army, Air Force and Coast Guard counterparts -- on the Discovery Channel.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Adm. Charles R. Larson, the onetime commander-in-chief of military forces in the Pacific who became superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy to restore discipline and morale after his alma mater had been rocked by the largest cheating scandal in its history, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis. He was 77. Admiral Larson's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Cmdr. Wesley Huey, a faculty member at the academy. Commander Huey said the four-star admiral had been diagnosed with leukemia two years ago. "Admiral Larson's death is a great loss for the Navy family and the U.S. Naval Academy," said Vice Admiral Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr., who took over as the academy's superintendent Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
Naval Academy officials and some midshipmen aren't buying a congressional survey that says 70 percent of female midshipmen have experienced repeated sexual harassment. Their research shows that nearly all of the women feel accepted in the brigade, they say."The ones that are complaining are usually the ones that have problems with the academics of this place," said Midshipman Katie Dooley, a senior. "We are trying so hard to assimilate, and they keep bringing that up."Debbie Roberge, also a senior, said those who are complaining can't meet the academy's rigorous standards.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Vice Adm. Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr. will formally relieve Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller as superintendent of the Naval Academy during a change-of-command ceremony scheduled July 23, academy officials said Thursday. Carter, who until this month was head of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., is a 1981 graduate of the academy and a record-setting naval aviator. The Rhode Island native holds the Navy's record for carrier-assisted landings with 2,016, according to his official biography.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | July 10, 1991
Lorraine and Roy Milark said they weren't the least bit apprehensive about sending their 17-year-old daughter off to the U.S. Naval Academy, an institution with a reputation almost as tough as its standards."
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
Saying the Naval Academy should be grooming future officers, not rehabilitating teens, some alumni are angry about the academy's acceptance of an 18-year-old from Massachusetts who recently had a run-in with police there. High school graduate Asa Jearld faced felony charges last month after police said he led them on a car chase, fled on foot from an officer, and later attempted to file a false report claiming that his car had been stolen. Jearld, a highly regarded student who was senior class vice president and salutatorian at his Falmouth, Mass.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2000
Midshipmen can no longer trade exemplary performance at the Naval Academy for weekend leave. "Our object is to keep midshipmen at the academy more, not less," said Capt. Lee Geanuleas, director of the academy's professional development division, in explaining the change at the thrice-yearly meeting of the school's Board of Visitors yesterday. The board, a congressionally appointed group that runs the academy, also heard from Geanuleas that the new policy is an attempt to maintain rankings between classes and to end the idea that leaving campus is a prize.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | January 9, 1993
The Naval Academy has charged four male midshipmen with assault after an investigation into a pre-football game pillow attack that left two female midshipmen with bruises and a black eye.During the week before the Dec. 5 Army-Navy football game, dozens of midshipmen pummeled each other with pillows in the Bancroft Hall dormitory. The attack on the two women, which apparently got out of control, was the only one that resulted in injuries, academy officials said.They did not know whether the bruises and black eye were the resultof punches or sharply snapped pillow cases, academy officials said.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1995
The Naval Academy's sports program, criticized for questionable spending, got another watchdog yesterday.The Board of Visitors, the academy's governing board, created a standing committee to periodically review the Naval Academy Athletic Association.The Sun reported in 1992 that the NAAA, a private, nonprofit organization that finances Navy athletics, bought a $317,000 condominium for Jack Lengyel, the Annapolis school's athletic director and NAAA president.The association also sent 96 academy officials, private citizens and local businessmen on an all-expenses-paid trip to the annual Army-Navy game in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
Naval Academy officials have announced that comedian Dana Carvey's performance has been canceled. His performance was scheduled Friday at Alumni Hall.School of technology to sponsor open houseThe Center of Applied Technology-South, 211 Central Ave., Edgewater, will sponsor an open house from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow.School officials will lead a tour of the center, and students will offer shop demonstrations.Information: 956-5900.Chemical society honors Naval Academy professorRetired Naval Academy professor Samuel P. Massie has received the American Chemical Society award for encouraging disadvantaged students to seek chemical sciences careers.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A federal judge denied on Monday a request to strip the U.S. Naval Academy superintendent of his authority to decide whether to prosecute a sexual assault case involving three former Navy football players. "For me to stick my nose in the Navy's business at this time would be inappropriate," said U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander as she ruled from the bench. A female midshipmen who accused three classmates of assaulting her at an off-campus party in Annapolis in 2012 asked the court to remove the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael Miller, from the case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Funneling a beer through a bong is Anne Kendzior's last memory of a night of partying inside a sparsely furnished off-campus house rented for Naval Academy lacrosse players. She says she crashed on an air mattress in a bedroom sometime around 1 a.m. and awoke on that fall day in 2008 to a fellow midshipman raping her, according to court documents and an interview. The onetime Texas high school soccer star says she remembers asking in a haze, "What are you doing?" but she would allegedly suffer another sexual assault and consider suicide before ever speaking to authorities.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Juan Magallon enlisted in the U.S. Navy while still in his home country, the Philippines, and served 20 years, taking part in such battles as Operation Desert Storm. Now a U.S. citizen, the Tucson, Ariz., resident said he frequently spoke to his son, Justin, about the gratitude he owed the nation and its armed forces. Apparently, Justin listened. He is among 1,200 plebes in the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2017 who since June have been immersed in their first year at Annapolis, away from friends and family.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
The superintendent of the Naval Academy has decided to bring charges in the alleged sexual assault of a female midshipman last year by three members of the football team, academy officials said Monday. The woman has told Naval investigators she remembers little of the alleged assault, which she said occurred after she became intoxicated at an off-campus party in Annapolis, according to her attorney. Susan Burke, the Washington-based attorney, says the alleged victim learned from friends and social media that three football players were claiming after the party that they had had sex with her while she was incapacitated.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | February 10, 2012
As part of the academic aspect of the annual Basketball Academy two major scholarships are awarded to girls and boys participating in the event held last month, the $1,000 James Thomas Hubbard Memorial Scholarship and the $500 Downtown Locker Room Scholarship. Digital Harbor's Kirsten Gaither-McDonald and Lake Clifton's Aaron Parks received the Hubbard scholarships while Aberdeen's Nia Alleyne and St. Frances's Miles Code received the Downtown Locker Room awards. The Hubbard scholarships were created by his family to honor the a senior girl and boy “making the greatest contribution to his or her team in terms of overall excellence in participation, performance and leadership while maintaining a minimum 2.5 GPA.” The Downtownn Locker Room scholarship honors the players with the highest cumulative GPAs one each team in the tournament.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
If Baltimore City schools and Basketball Academy officials have their way, the popular event will return to a college campus next year. Because of NCAA regulations banning "nonscholastic" high school basketball events from Division I college campuses, this week's 16 t h Annual Basketball Academy had to be moved from Coppin State to Lake Clifton. Basketball Academy officials, however, believe their event is a scholastic event. "I feel very confident we'll be back on a college campus," said Bob Wade, coordinator of athletics for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
June 2, 1993
Women and minorities trail white men in most areas of the U.S. Naval Academy's scholastic and military training, according a recently released report by the General Accounting Office.Academy officials responded that the study "rehashes many old findings and previously reported data" because it was based on surveys taken two and three years ago.The GAO report, which was made public April 30, faulted the academy for higher attrition rates among women and minorities. It also found that women and minorities were more likely than their male counterparts to be cited for honor code violations and that their punishment was more severe.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
The superintendent of the Naval Academy, Vice Adm. Richard J. Naughton, made a forceful statement yesterday expressing "zero tolerance" for sexual assault at the military college and vowing to promptly investigate all complaints. It was Naughton's first public statement on the issue since the Air Force Academy, in Colorado Springs, Colo., came under fire for its mishandling of sexual assault cases. The statement seemed aimed at assuring the school's oversight panel and the public that the Naval Academy was committed to aggressively pursuing complaints of sexual misconduct.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
The number of sexual assaults reported at the Naval Academy doubled during the 2010-2011 academic year, as did the percentage of female midshipmen reporting unwanted sexual contact, according to a report released Tuesday by the Defense Department. The number of assaults reported at the Naval Academy rose from 11 to 22, according to the Pentagon's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office. That's more than twice the number of assaults that were reported at the U.S. Military Academy, which had 10, but fewer than the 33 reported at the Air Force Academy during 2010-2011.
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