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By Cox News Service | December 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Going one better than President Bush's "no net loss" of wetlands pledge, a committee of the National Academy of Sciences says America needs "an accelerated national effort" to repair lakes, marshes, streams and swamps that already are polluted or otherwise damaged.The committee urged the federal government to establish a long-term strategy for restoring the nation's aquatic ecosystems and suggested that Congress create a "national aquatic restoration trust fund" to finance it.However, in a report entitled, "Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology and Public Policy," the panel avoided estimating how much a national restoration effort would cost.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A 14-year-old student at Friendship Academy of Science and Technology in Baltimore was stabbed Friday in the chest with a knife after a verbal altercation with a fellow student, according to a notification sent out to school officials obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A 17-year-old student was arrested. City school officials confirmed in a statement that a student "was injured by a weapon during an altercation" on Friday morning. The statement said the student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital and is in stable condition.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1997
People look at Joseph Field as sort of a meteorite splashing into the nearby Inner Harbor. This is one rare specimen.Field worked for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. for 40 years. Big deal. For 70 years -- since Charles Lindbergh was a nobody and Francis X. Bushman was Hollywood's biggest somebody -- he's volunteered at the Maryland Academy of Sciences, now also known as the Maryland Science Center."I believe in staying places," said Field, 85, retired 20 years and now a school bus greeter at the center.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
City school officials said they will take extra security measures at a Southeast Baltimore charter school after five fires were set this week at the school, which also had an altercation that injured an administrator and a student arrest. Officials said they will increase the presence of school police officers and district staff at the Friendship Academy of Science and Technology Middle/High School, which they acknowledged has had "significant safety issues" this week. Among them were five trash-can fires - two Wednesday and three Thursday.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Bill Edwards in Trappe saw a TV program about the use of chemicals "to divert or stop rain. ... I have noticed on many weekends that rain is predicted [but] it does not rain in this area. Curious." Forecasters can be wrong, and summertime showers can be hit-or-miss. The National Academy of Sciences found that, except for dissipating rare "cold fog," cloud seeding for weather control is "an act of faith," not science.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
OFTEN, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences preaches to the world in awarding Nobel Prizes for Economics. It suggests what theories, policies or nostrums are good for nations that may regard them as bitter medicine. But in awarding the 1999 Nobel Prize to Robert Mundell, the Academy is sending a message to the Swedish people.Sweden belongs to the 15-nation European Union (EU) but not to its 11-nation European Monetary Union (EMU). Sweden qualifies to adopt the euro as currency in place of the krona, but declines.
NEWS
November 5, 1990
A memorial service for J. Cookman Boyd Jr., a Baltimore lawyer and former chairman of the Maryland Academy of Sciences, will be at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church, at Charles and Saratoga streets.Mr. Boyd died yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital following a stroke. He was 84.Until his brief illness, Mr. Boyd maintained numerous civic interests and was active in his practice with the law firm of Boyd Benson & Hendrickson.Mr. Boyd graduated from the Johns Hopkins University in 1927 and the University of Maryland School of Law in 1930.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
Annapolis scientist honored for his workDr. Appajosula Srinivasa Rao of Annapolis has been honored by the Washington Academy of Sciences for his outstanding achievement in the field of physical sciences.He also received a one-year honorary membership in the academy. Dr. Rao is an employee of the Carderock Division ofthe Naval Surface Warfare Center in Annapolis.POLICE LOG* Annapolis: Someone threw a cinder block through the front door of Jennison Fashion, at 167 Jennifer Road, Tuesday morning and stole 40 summer suits worth about $4,000.
NEWS
November 5, 1990
J. Cookman Boyd Jr., a Baltimore lawyer and former chairman of the Maryland Academy of Sciences, died yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital following a stroke. He was 84.A memorial service for Mr. Boyd will be at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Charles and Saratoga streets.Until his brief illness, Mr. Boyd maintained numerous civic interests and was active in his practice with the law firm of Boyd Benson & Hendrickson.He graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1927 and the University of Maryland School of Law in 1930.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2004
Music Carl Thomas brings a grown-up, rich vocal sound to his sophomore album, Let's Talk About It. page 25 Eats More than 250 years after Reynolds Tavern opened in Annapolis, the building is home to Sly Fox Pub, as well as a tea room and an inn. page 20 Family Nickelodeon's animated hit Dora the Explorer turns live in "Dora the Explorer Live!: Search for the City of Lost Toys," opening Wednesday at the Hippodrome. page 33 Stage The classical-music lover has almost unlimited choices this weekend -- and next week, barrier-breaking cellist Matt Haimovitz (pictured)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A panel of independent scientists has found flaws in the Army's planning to shield workers and the public from harm from a proposed biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. The seven-member committee assembled by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the risk assessment being done by an Army contractor is "not sufficiently robust" to help design a facility that will reduce potential hazards. The $584 million, 492,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility would develop and test vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat infectious diseases.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Bill Edwards in Trappe saw a TV program about the use of chemicals "to divert or stop rain. ... I have noticed on many weekends that rain is predicted [but] it does not rain in this area. Curious." Forecasters can be wrong, and summertime showers can be hit-or-miss. The National Academy of Sciences found that, except for dissipating rare "cold fog," cloud seeding for weather control is "an act of faith," not science.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
LEONID HURWICZ, 90 Nobel laureate in economics Leonid Hurwicz, who shared the Nobel Prize in economics last year for developing a theory that helps explain how buyers and sellers can maximize their gains, has died, a spokesman said yesterday. Dr. Hurwicz died Tuesday, said Mark Cassutt, spokesman for the University of Minnesota, where Dr. Hurwicz was an emeritus economics professor.. Dr. Hurwicz was given his prize in Minneapolis last December because he couldn't make the trip to Stockholm, Sweden.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
The controversy over Baltimore County Circuit Judge Susan M. Souder's decision to throw out the testimony of a fingerprint analyst in a death penalty trial hasn't stopped. Her opinion has reached universities, judicial chambers and evidence labs across the country. But it's the National Academy of Sciences review of the forensic science field now under way that could have real implications for analysis of fingerprints, hair and other physical evidence - and their use in criminal trials nationwide.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | December 4, 2006
CHICAGO -- When the panic about silicone breast implants erupted back in 1991, it was big news. But when the last chapter of that saga was closed a couple of weeks ago, hardly anyone noticed. Government regulators and journalists often find it tempting to set off loud, clanging alarms. They don't find it nearly so enjoyable to publicize when the alarms turn out to be false. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration decided that the medical evidence was sufficiently positive to let these devices back on the market.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse might be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It might be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. "There's plenty of evidence that facial expressions are inherited," says Gili Peleg, a doctoral candidate at the university's Institute of Evolution and lead investigator on the study.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
The chancellor of the Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences yesterday wrapped up a visit to Baltimore by praising doctors and scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for their attention to the ethical dimensions of genetics research.Archbishop Giuseppe Pittau, who along with Cardinal William H. Keeler met Wednesday with Hopkins researchers, said he was impressed by the way they have maneuvered through the ethical minefield that is associated with genetics research.In addition to heading the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, which advises the pope on scientific developments, Pittau leads the Vatican congregation that supervises Roman Catholic schools, seminaries and universities.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
LEONID HURWICZ, 90 Nobel laureate in economics Leonid Hurwicz, who shared the Nobel Prize in economics last year for developing a theory that helps explain how buyers and sellers can maximize their gains, has died, a spokesman said yesterday. Dr. Hurwicz died Tuesday, said Mark Cassutt, spokesman for the University of Minnesota, where Dr. Hurwicz was an emeritus economics professor.. Dr. Hurwicz was given his prize in Minneapolis last December because he couldn't make the trip to Stockholm, Sweden.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
Three decades ago, a group of amateur scientists came up with an idea for a new museum, one that would stand out from the harbor's industrial blight, a place where children could grab, prod and poke exhibits and occasionally be electrified by science. It was a quite a gamble for science buffs who were best known for their collection of antique telescopes. But it paid off: Today marks the 30th anniversary of their dream, the Maryland Science Center. In the past three decades, thousands of youngsters have visited the center to learn the names of the stars, to dig for fossils and to touch a charged silver ball that makes their hair stand on end. Once the lone tourist attraction on the harbor's shore, the Maryland Science Center has become a city landmark and a symbol of the transformation that turned a working port into Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a booming tourist area that pumps tens of millions of dollars into the city's coffers annually.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
With a tennis match under way nearby, state archaeologists used chisels and crowbars yesterday to dislodge Native American carvings at Baltimore's Druid Hill Park, where they had been all but forgotten for decades. More than two dozen of the mysterious prehistoric stone carvings - which could be thousands of years old - are being removed to be studied at a Calvert County laboratory and eventually put on display. Transported to Baltimore from the Susquehanna Valley in the 1920s, the carvings were rediscovered recently by officials at the Maryland Historical Trust.
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