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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 16, 2003
A nine-year, $250 million project to renovate Bancroft Hall, the Naval Academy's sprawling dormitory, was declared complete yesterday at a ribbon-cutting ceremony inside its ornate central rotunda. Workers refurbished the Beaux Arts building's original interior, stripped out toxic materials such as lead and asbestos, modernized mechanical and electrical systems, and installed 1,600 miles of wires to equip the dorm with a high-tech computer data network. "Today is not just the completion of a renovation of a building - today is the completion of the soul of our naval service," Col. John R. Allen, the commandant of midshipmen, said at the morning ceremony.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
Monarch Global Academy will hold open house informational sessions for prospective students on Oct. 14, Nov. 18 and Dec. 19 from 6:30 to 7:30 at the recently opened school on Brock Bridge Road in Laurel. A tuition-free public contract school, Monarch Global Academy is accepting applications for fall 2015 from students that will be entering kindergarten through sixth grade and living in the attendance areas of Brock Bridge, Maryland City and Jessup elementary schools. The application deadline is Dec. 17 at noon.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
You know you're exceptional at managing money when your parents come to you to borrow an occasional $10 or $20 — and you're just 7 years old. Wilde Lake High School senior Taylor Bruner has long had been adept at money matters, and that has developed into an interest that may reap dividends not only after after high school, but also help her and three other like-minded students at Howard County's Applications and Research Lab win a state finance...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Peter John Vogelberger Jr., a retired nuclear engineer and past president of Teledyne Energy Systems who headed the development of devices used in 1970s space exploration, died of undetermined causes Sept. 7 at his Lutherville home. He was 82. Born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Peter J. Vogelberger Sr. and the former Agnes Snyderwine. A standout high school athlete, he was recruited to the Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Class of 1954 and was an honors graduate.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Just three days after being touted as the commander who would oversee reforms in the wake of an accidental shooting during training, the new head of the Baltimore police academy informed top brass Friday that he intends to leave the agency. Maj. Joseph E. Smith III, a 25-year veteran, told the police commissioner that he plans to retire from the department and take an outside job, according to a police spokesman. Smith could not be reached for comment. "He said it was too big of an opportunity to pass up," said chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenneth Turan and Tribune Newspapers | February 5, 2010
I was afraid. I was very afraid. As the clock ticked down to 5:38 and 30 seconds Tuesday morning (the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is nothing if not precise), I found myself, as a partisan of the Oscar's sea change from five to 10 best-picture nominees, getting increasingly worried about how it would all play out. Instead of the broad audience pictures the academy was hoping for, would the membership end up voting for 10 niche items? Would (bite your tongue at the very thought)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
The head of Baltimore's fire academy has been reassigned, Fire Chief James S. Clack said Tuesday, a week after officials began an investigation into cheating at the academy. Chief Lloyd Carter will now head the department's recruiting efforts, Clack said. He denied that the transfer was related to the cheating investigation, which centers around allegations that an instructor handed students a scenario for a lifesaving practical exam. "It's unfortunate this is happening during the investigation, but it's more about having someone interested who can lead recruiting," said Clack.
NEWS
December 31, 2006
Early in the 19th century, Maryland encouraged a movement to establish academies to "prepare students for entrance into institutions of higher learning and for public life." One such academy was the Darlington Academy. Building began in June of 1841, and the first floor was opened in December. John M. Cooley was the headmaster. The state donated $150 annually but though the academy was a "public" school, tuition was required. Financial help was provided to some students by donors. An early photograph suggests that, at least until 1867, black and white students attended the academy together.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
A Naval Academy report being prepared for Congress calls for stricter control over the academy's private athletic association but does not recommend that the federal government take financial control of Navy sports, according to Navy and congressional sources.Taking over the private, nonprofit Naval Academy Athletic Association would force the government to spend about $25 million to buy Navy-Marine Corps Memorial stadium and its 59 acres from the NAAA.Also, the Navy sports program would lose control over the money it receives from such sources as the millions of dollars in television rights for Navy football and the annual $223,000 from the state and Annapolis pay to rent its stadium parking lot.Adm.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
The Naval Academy superintendent has rejected a proposed pregnancy policy that both anti-abortion groups and supporters of abortion rights said would have encouraged abortion, an academy spokesman said yesterday.On Wednesday, academy officials said a panel had been appointed to review the academy's policy on pregnant midshipmen, but wouldn't say whether it was considering allowing pregnant midshipmen to stay at the academy if they terminated the pregnancy in 30 days. When the academy superintendent "has all the information, he will make a decision," an academy spokeswoman said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Navy identified the pilot Monday who went missing last week after a crash over the Pacific Ocean as Lt. Nathan Poloski, a 2009 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Poloski, 26, of Lake Arrowhead, Calif., is presumed dead, officials said. "Nathan was an outstanding person, naval officer and aviator," Navy Cmdr. Michael Langbehn, the commanding officer of Poloski's squadron, said in a statement. "My personal thoughts and prayers are for his family, friends and shipmates as they endure this immeasurable loss.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The operators of the former Naval Academy dairy farm in Gambrills, who sparked debate earlier this year when they announced plans to cut back organic farming practices there, will get to stay on the property another five years, Anne Arundel County officials said Tuesday. Edwin and Marian Fry, who have operated Maryland Sunrise Farm for years, were selected after County Executive Laura Neuman sought proposals to run the farm, which is owned by the Navy and leased to the county government.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The new superintendent of the Naval Academy said Thursday that the institution is a national leader in confronting sexual assault and sexual harassment among students, and should be helping other schools tackle what he described as a widespread problem. The Naval Academy has drawn national attention for the alleged assault of a female midshipman at a party in Annapolis and the subsequent investigation of three members of the Navy football team. The prosecution came amid a growing public focus on sexual assaults both in the military and on college campuses.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
NEWS
By Chris Soto | August 11, 2014
Every so often, there is reason to cheer a little louder both within the gates of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., and 350 miles down Interstate 95 at the U.S. Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. This year, the academy had a banner admissions class, enrolling 256 highly qualified, bright-eyed cadets who took their oaths of office under a beautiful New England summer sky on June 30th. The group, not including international cadets, boasts an average GPA of 3.87 and includes 214 varsity letter earners, numerous class presidents and many other talented young people who will lead our great nation into the next generation.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The State Highway Administration will begin a project Monday designed to upgrade 80 light poles and fixtures on the Route 450 (King George Street) bridge over Severn River, also known as the Naval Academy Bridge, in Annapolis. Work includes replacing poles and wiring and installing new decorative, energy-efficient LED lighting. The bridge has sidewalks and bike lanes in both directions. Crews will work on one side of the bridge at a time, closing one sidewalk and bicycle lane.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
The emphasis on character has always distinguished the service academies from other institutions of higher learning. Officers are expected to be gentlemen, not just good students. Dishonor is a deadly sin. The moral ground is presumably so high that only the most sterling young men and women are allowed XTC the opportunity to climb.Yet here is the U.S. Naval Academy -- the place where midshipmen do not lie, cheat or steal -- preparing to take action against 125 students who lied, cheated and/or stole a notoriously difficult electrical engineering exam in December 1992.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Adm. Charles R. Larson, the onetime commander-in-chief of military forces in the Pacific who became superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy to restore discipline and morale after his alma mater had been rocked by the largest cheating scandal in its history, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis. He was 77. Admiral Larson's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Cmdr. Wesley Huey, a faculty member at the academy. Commander Huey said the four-star admiral had been diagnosed with leukemia two years ago. "Admiral Larson's death is a great loss for the Navy family and the U.S. Naval Academy," said Vice Admiral Walter E. "Ted" Carter Jr., who took over as the academy's superintendent Wednesday.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Eric Thompson said among the first challenges in his Arab immersion class was learning the Arabic word for "yes. " To the Arnold resident, it sounded a lot like the English word, "no. " "So when teachers are congratulating you, you're saying, 'Oh, I have messed up,'" said the 17-year old, who is among dozens of foreign language students in the recent Launch into Arabic Learning and Teaching Program, a summer immersion initiative coordinated by...
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