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EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Seniors from all 25 Baltimore County Public Schools high schools were recognized on May 4 for achievements as Presidential Scholar candidates, National Merit Scholar semi-finalists, National Achievement Scholars, and Ethics Award winners. Following is a list of local students honored by Superintendent Joe Hairston, principals and others at the ceremony, held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Timonium: National Achievement Scholars — Shannon Hubbard, Towson High School. National Merit Scholar Semi-Finalists — Dulaney High School students Elizabeth Demetrides, Kun Leng, Jiaqi Liu, Eric Olsen, Kathleen Schmitz, Brett Turlington and Alan Zhang; Elizabeth Pena of the George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology; Rohan Goswami of Loch Raven High School; and Towson High School students Johann Amberger, Annie Bishai, Laura Greenbaum and Zachary Nusbaum.
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NEWS
By Dallas Dance | August 26, 2014
Tomorrow is not just the first day of the 2014-2015 school year for 110,000 students in Baltimore County Public Schools. It's also the launch of initiatives to create opportunity-rich environments in every school, in every classroom and for every student. It has never been more important to educate students to high levels for their own individual success as well as the success of our county and nation. However, decades of data tell us that far too often being a student of color or a student from a low-income family correlates to lower academic achievement.
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EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | October 20, 2012
Despite spending a year away from football, Tyrice Rock of Century High School seemingly hasn't missed a beat, and is having a season that most players only dream about. The senior Knight leads Carroll County in rushing attempts and yardage, and his 20 touchdowns far outdistance the current runner-up, Westminster wide receiver Garrett Bean. He has exceeded the 100-yard rushing mark in six of Century's seven games, and has gone for more than 200 yards four times. Even with a tough performance Friday against Westminster, Rock still has a chance to break the all-time Carroll records for rushing yardage and touchdowns.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Some Howard County black high school students will gather at Hammond High School tomorrow for a leadership retreat that will mix academics with contemporary music and other elements of "hip-hop" culture."
NEWS
November 15, 2000
EVERYONE LOVES a winner. And college football fans are less tolerant than anyone of a perennial loser. When a pigskin powerhouse becomes a cupcake scrounging for victories, alumni and other die-hards can be unrelenting in demanding that revival of the program come first. Few college presidents have the courage to stand up to those fans, to insist that no matter how many losses the team racks up, academics comes first. For displaying that kind of intestinal fortitude, as reported in a series of Sun articles by Christian Ewell this week, Morgan State University President Earl S. Richardson deserves a rousing cheer.
SPORTS
December 24, 2007
One of the arguments we used to hear about the absence of a playoff system at the highest level of college football is the negative impact of extra games on the academics of student-athletes. Maybe that kind of talk is much quieter these days, with the ever-weakening argument focused more on preserving the bowl system for reasons that don't seem quite clear to Mr. Flip. (Corporations don't have enough sporting events to attach their names to?) In any case, the lead-up to bowl games inevitably includes reports of Fred "40 Yard" Dash being declared academically ineligible to play in the Spacely Sprockets Greater Bedrock Bowl.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 2, 1998
Former Western High School basketball coach Breezy Bishop has resigned as an assistant coach at North Carolina State after one season for the opportunity to start a program here for girls that combines basketball with academics.The Breezy Bishop Academic Basketball Academy will concentrate on 10- to 14-year-old girls with a tentative starting date of October. Bishop declined to give specifics about the academy, saying only that she is looking for financing and housing."It's a dream that I've always had," said Bishop, 62. "I consider myself a trouble-shooter, and right now, the trouble is at the middle-school age. A lot of middle-school kids don't even make it to high school.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1997
In a long-awaited response to community criticisms of the emphasis on self-esteem over academics in Howard County's middle schools, top school system officials said yesterday they intend to refocus sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders on achievement.But in responding to separate evaluations of Howard's middle schools last fall by a citizens committee and outside consultants, the officials stopped short of endorsing such recommendations as grouping students in classes by abilities.Officials did announce that they will increase the time spent on basic instruction and establish tests and standards of performance for each middle school grade.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2004
This summer, 10-year-old Jared Cole-Lewis has a rare luxury: daily computer time at school. Jared and his classmates are editing an action movie they scripted and videotaped as part of the Black Student Achievement Program's Summer Bridge program. Despite the name, Summer Bridge seeks to do more than fill the gap between mid-June and late August for its students. "We're trying to accelerate them," said Ron Morris, assistant principal of Bellows Spring Elementary and one of two administrators on site at Wilde Lake High.
NEWS
By Tiffany Gueye | June 16, 2014
Last week, The Sun reported on Baltimore City Public School's (BCPS) efforts to increase academic promotion rates among middle school students by giving them the chance to attend BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) summer learning programs. The article cited a decline in promotion rates for BELL participants, particularly for 6th graders. While we are disappointed that not all students demonstrate the literacy and math skills they need to be promoted to the next grade, our nonprofit organization, which partners here and nationally with schools to expand learning time in the summer and after school, thinks that focusing on test scores alone obscures important outcomes and raises a key question: What role do summer learning programs have in a student's life?
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
In the American dream a child can rise above a low-income background to go to college and then a high-paying job, but research by a Johns Hopkins University sociologist over a quarter of a century shows it rarely happens in Baltimore. Karl Alexander, with two other researchers, followed nearly 800 children from varied socioeconomic backgrounds from the time they entered first grade in a Baltimore City public school in fall 1982 until they turned 28 or 29 years old. They found just 4 percent of students from low-income families in the study group attained a college degree.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
A proposal for Morgan State University to offer joint academic programs with Towson University is drawing objections from some Morgan officials who believe such a setup would benefit Towson far more than the Baltimore institution. The plan, which is in the early stages, emerged just months after a judge ordered the state and the state's four historically black colleges, including Morgan, into mediation to settle alleged disparities in funding and duplication of programs at historically black institutions by other state colleges and universities.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | May 23, 2014
The Baltimore Urban Debate League, a 15-year-old trailblazing program whose students have been lauded locally and nationally for their successes in competitions and the classroom, has been identified as the 2014 Urban Debate League of the Year. The National Association of Urban Debate Leagues announced the national title last month, according to a release from the organization.  The city's league, one of 400 in 19 cities, was recognized for its after-school and summer programs, which were called "life-changing," and for being a leader among urban debate leagues across the country.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | May 15, 2014
There are always reasons for concern about Harford County Public Schools. Their absence from any or all of the lists of the best high schools is not one of them. Everyone from students and parents and teachers to taxpayers and politicians wants their schools to be the best. Just because Newsweek (available only online until recently) or U.S. News & World Report says it's so doesn't make it so. Nor, does it mean they aren't among the best just because they're missing from some list.
NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Stacks of classroom furniture line the darkened hallways of Patapsco High School in eastern Baltimore County. On an afternoon thick with haze, doors yawn open to catch the slightest gift of a summer breeze.Here in a school mostly shuttered for the summer, Edward Wiley Jr., 14, and fellow members of Summer Enrichment Camp -- a branch of America's summer jobs program -- are expanding their horizons through the program born in the tumultuous 1960s.Not long ago, the soft-spoken Wiley thought he was headed for the steel mill like his father and grandfather.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2008
About 65 male students filed into a music room at Magnolia Middle School and found a seat on a tiered stage in the back of the room. Standing in front of them, the Rev. Alfred Reeves polled the boys on who was academically eligible to participate in an upcoming basketball game at the school. After he determined that about 25 students were ineligible, he challenged the boys. "I expect the eligible students to help the students who are ineligible get their grades up," Reeves said. "If at least half of the students who are currently ineligible don't become eligible by our Feb. 12 game, I'm canceling it."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
While Centennial Conference teams Dickinson, Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg battled for their playoff lives last weekend, Washington College had the weekend off after wrapping up a 13-1 overall record and an 8-0 league mark in the regular season with an 11-6 victory over Swarthmore on Wednesday. It was a welcomed break for the No. 6 Shoremen, coach Jeff Shirk said. “I do like the fact that we were able to give our guys a couple days off, having that bye,” he said on Monday.
NEWS
By Ann Kirschner | April 28, 2014
As we enter graduation season, students across the country will be worrying less about final exams and more about jobs. What will make them stand out to employers? Working, studying or volunteering away from the United States is one key strategy. Ask a recent graduate about the best experience they had in college, and I bet that you will hear "study abroad" as often as any other answer. It is ironic, but not surprising, that the most transformative college experience is often the one that happened far away from college.
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