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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
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Sports Digest | October 26, 2012
Et cetera Maryland's graduation success rate rises again University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from 2002-03 through 2005-06. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
— The rate that the NCAA uses to chart football players' paths toward graduation has declined at Maryland for five straight years, placing it next to last in the Atlantic Coast Conference and evoking concern — and changes — at the school. The football program's Academic Progress Rate — based on players' performances over four rolling academic years — has dropped each year from 2005 through 2010, according to NCAA online records. While some of the declines were marginal, Maryland ranked 11th out of 12 ACC schools — ahead of only Florida State — in the figures released last June.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
SPORTS
October 31, 2011
Networks should pay Coley Harvey Orlando Sentinel With the reforms announced last week, at least we can finally say the NCAA is no longer crawling around aimlessly on its hands and knees. The big boy diapers may remain, but at least the association has taken its first baby step. Applause for the proposed move to pay student-athletes a $2,000 stipend, and further applause for the multiyear scholarships they can now sign. The only problem is this: Who will fund it all?
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Penalties hurt a football team, and the University of Maryland squad will start the season burdened with two infractions picked up recently from the National Collegiate Athletic Association. One, announced this month, was for violating practice rules. The other, more serious infraction, announced in April, was assessed for poor academic performance by the Terp players. Both occurred under the tenure of former head football coach Ralph Friedgen, who was replaced in January byRandy Edsall.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
The NCAA is stripping Maryland of three football scholarships because of poor academic performance in recent years, particularly the 2-10 season of 2009. The penalty will be imposed in the fall. It will be the first time Maryland has been docked scholarships in any sport since the NCAA began collecting such academic data in 2003-04. The scholarships reductions won't be announced publicly by the NCAA until it releases its list of Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores and penalties in the late spring.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 26, 2012
Et cetera Maryland's graduation success rate rises again University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from 2002-03 through 2005-06. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
After learning that the Maryland football program will lose three scholarships for the upcoming season because of their Academic Progress Rate (APR) dipping below the NCAA minimum, first-year Terps coach Randy Edsall has worked to put a system in place to rectify the problem and prevent any future failings. "Academics is going to be something that's very, very important," Edsall said in conference call with reporters Monday. "I feel good about the things that we're putting into place to allow our young men to be successful in the classroom.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
The NCAA has told Maryland that it stands to lose three football scholarships because the rate that charts players' paths toward graduation slipped beneath acceptable levels. The penalty, triggered largely by a poor academic showing during the disastrous 2-10 season of 2009, is not final. Maryland could still receive a waiver or, absent that, file an appeal. It would be the first time Maryland has been docked scholarships in any sport since the NCAA began collecting such academic data in 2003-04.
SPORTS
October 31, 2011
Networks should pay Coley Harvey Orlando Sentinel With the reforms announced last week, at least we can finally say the NCAA is no longer crawling around aimlessly on its hands and knees. The big boy diapers may remain, but at least the association has taken its first baby step. Applause for the proposed move to pay student-athletes a $2,000 stipend, and further applause for the multiyear scholarships they can now sign. The only problem is this: Who will fund it all?
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Penalties hurt a football team, and the University of Maryland squad will start the season burdened with two infractions picked up recently from the National Collegiate Athletic Association. One, announced this month, was for violating practice rules. The other, more serious infraction, announced in April, was assessed for poor academic performance by the Terp players. Both occurred under the tenure of former head football coach Ralph Friedgen, who was replaced in January byRandy Edsall.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
After learning that the Maryland football program will lose three scholarships for the upcoming season because of their Academic Progress Rate (APR) dipping below the NCAA minimum, first-year Terps coach Randy Edsall has worked to put a system in place to rectify the problem and prevent any future failings. "Academics is going to be something that's very, very important," Edsall said in conference call with reporters Monday. "I feel good about the things that we're putting into place to allow our young men to be successful in the classroom.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
The NCAA is stripping Maryland of three football scholarships because of poor academic performance in recent years, particularly the 2-10 season of 2009. The penalty will be imposed in the fall. It will be the first time Maryland has been docked scholarships in any sport since the NCAA began collecting such academic data in 2003-04. The scholarships reductions won't be announced publicly by the NCAA until it releases its list of Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores and penalties in the late spring.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
The NCAA has told Maryland that it stands to lose three football scholarships because the rate that charts players' paths toward graduation slipped beneath acceptable levels. The penalty, triggered largely by a poor academic showing during the disastrous 2-10 season of 2009, is not final. Maryland could still receive a waiver or, absent that, file an appeal. It would be the first time Maryland has been docked scholarships in any sport since the NCAA began collecting such academic data in 2003-04.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Collegiate sports are filled with statistics, some meaningful, some not. One worth watching is a school's academic progress rate. Compiled by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, it is based on the number of team members who stay enrolled and academically eligible. In short, it measures the athletes' progress toward graduation. Lately, these numbers for University of Maryland football players have been sorry — the team's academic progress rate has dropped for five years in a row. In the Atlantic Coast Conference rankings, the Terps are almost in the cellar in this category, ahead of only Florida State University.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Collegiate sports are filled with statistics, some meaningful, some not. One worth watching is a school's academic progress rate. Compiled by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, it is based on the number of team members who stay enrolled and academically eligible. In short, it measures the athletes' progress toward graduation. Lately, these numbers for University of Maryland football players have been sorry — the team's academic progress rate has dropped for five years in a row. In the Atlantic Coast Conference rankings, the Terps are almost in the cellar in this category, ahead of only Florida State University.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007
Heather A. Dinich explains how the Maryland men's basketball team could lose scholarships if it doesn't raise its Academic Progress Rate. Go to baltimoresun.com/dinich.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
— The rate that the NCAA uses to chart football players' paths toward graduation has declined at Maryland for five straight years, placing it next to last in the Atlantic Coast Conference and evoking concern — and changes — at the school. The football program's Academic Progress Rate — based on players' performances over four rolling academic years — has dropped each year from 2005 through 2010, according to NCAA online records. While some of the declines were marginal, Maryland ranked 11th out of 12 ACC schools — ahead of only Florida State — in the figures released last June.
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