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Academic Progress

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NEWS
August 29, 2013
The recent series of features and editorials on the subject of Advanced Placement achievement in Maryland left an incomplete picture and unfair impression of Dorchester County Public Schools ("AP is not for everyone," Aug. 24). Over the last several years, we have pursued strategic initiatives to provide our children with a variety of program options to fulfill our mission that every child finish his or her program of study and become college and career ready. Notable among these are the construction of a new Dorchester Career and Technology Center to increase the number of technical career completer programs from 11 to 20, and securing a dual enrollment grant that has significantly increased our student participation in college credit bearing courses.
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NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | December 5, 2013
The Baltimore Sun gets high marks for uncovering the shameful fact that Maryland ranks first nationally in improperly excluding students with disabilities from taking the leading national test of reading ability ( "Md. excluded large number of special-education students in national test," Nov. 16). These exclusions inflate the state's test scores. They also deflate Maryland's reputation as the No. 1 education state as ranked by Education Week. The exclusions help to reveal how certain practices ruin many, if not most, chances that students with disabilities have for academic success.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
When the strongest vibrations of Tuesday's earthquake struck during the first day of school in Anne Arundel County, students at Wiley Bates Middle School in Annapolis heeded evacuation instructions blared over the public address system and filed out of the building without much commotion. When the students were outside, about a dozen approached Principal Diane Bragdon, asking whether it was a drill. "I guess they thought I could simulate shaking the building or something," said Bragdon.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
The recent series of features and editorials on the subject of Advanced Placement achievement in Maryland left an incomplete picture and unfair impression of Dorchester County Public Schools ("AP is not for everyone," Aug. 24). Over the last several years, we have pursued strategic initiatives to provide our children with a variety of program options to fulfill our mission that every child finish his or her program of study and become college and career ready. Notable among these are the construction of a new Dorchester Career and Technology Center to increase the number of technical career completer programs from 11 to 20, and securing a dual enrollment grant that has significantly increased our student participation in college credit bearing courses.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Maryland saw a dramatic decrease in the number of its elementary schools that received the highest rating for academic progress under a tough new school ranking system, according to results the state released Tuesday. Only 47 of the state's 892 elementary schools made it into "strand 1," the rung for schools that have made the most progress under the system, called the School Progress Index. That was down from 255 schools that met the criteria the year before, when the system was put into place.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Collegiate sports are filled with statistics, some meaningful, some not. One worth watching is a school's academic progress rate. Compiled by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, it is based on the number of team members who stay enrolled and academically eligible. In short, it measures the athletes' progress toward graduation. Lately, these numbers for University of Maryland football players have been sorry — the team's academic progress rate has dropped for five years in a row. In the Atlantic Coast Conference rankings, the Terps are almost in the cellar in this category, ahead of only Florida State University.
SPORTS
By JEFF BARKER and JEFF BARKER,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
The NCAA yesterday penalized 123 colleges and universities, including Morgan State, for having athletic teams that fell short of academic guidelines. The University of Maryland men's basketball team was below the cutoff score but wasn't penalized because players who left without graduating had already exhausted their eligibility. Nationally, men's basketball programs were the chief offenders. Morgan State was punished with the loss of 1.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
Baltimore City Community College - which has the lowest graduation and transfer rates of any community college in the state - has made little academic progress over the past two years and failed to carry out recommendations that might have helped it improve, according to a new report. The report, from the nonprofit Abell Foundation, outlines a litany of failure: Only 341 students graduated last year, 94 percent of entering students need remedial courses and nearly $700,000 has been spent on a computer program with no assessment of its effectiveness.
SPORTS
November 25, 2006
How Yow could prove UM makes the grade Maryland athletic director Deborah A. Yow wants the public to understand that she and others involved with UM athletics are doing a top-flight job in promoting academic progress among Terps athletes. Well, I have doubts about the extent of their success. No one has concerns about the academic progress of athletes in the minor sports. The concerns are primarily with basketball and football players. Let Yow demonstrate how good these athletes are as students.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Dozens of schools face a day of reckoning when the NCAA releases academic progress scores Tuesday under its increasingly tough policy of punishing institutions that fail to keep their athletes on track to graduate. A number of schools are expected to face scholarship losses and other penalties because the rules are stricter this year. Last year, three teams from Maryland schools received scores earning them warning letters. They were Coppin State baseball, Morgan State women's volleyball and UMES men's basketball.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Maryland saw a dramatic decrease in the number of its elementary schools that received the highest rating for academic progress under a tough new school ranking system, according to results the state released Tuesday. Only 47 of the state's 892 elementary schools made it into "strand 1," the rung for schools that have made the most progress under the system, called the School Progress Index. That was down from 255 schools that met the criteria the year before, when the system was put into place.
NEWS
By Jessica Gregg | August 5, 2013
I call it "the white remark. " Someone I don't know too well sidles up to me and says something they I assume I will agree with because of the color of my skin. Which in my case is the paler side of German/Irish. It happened just a few days ago. I was at an exercise class. One of my classmates whispered to me that this exercise center used to be a lot nicer "before the blacks" started coming. After Barack Obama won for the first time, an acquaintance who campaigned for him was excited that the election of a black president meant that we could finally talk about how racist black people are. He said this as we were sitting in a room full of white people in a wealthy neighborhood of this city that has always been white and always been wealthy.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
When the strongest vibrations of Tuesday's earthquake struck during the first day of school in Anne Arundel County, students at Wiley Bates Middle School in Annapolis heeded evacuation instructions blared over the public address system and filed out of the building without much commotion. When the students were outside, about a dozen approached Principal Diane Bragdon, asking whether it was a drill. "I guess they thought I could simulate shaking the building or something," said Bragdon.
SPORTS
By Matt Castello, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Since Randy Edsall took over for Ralph Friedgen in January, there has been a revolving door of coaches and players shuffling in and out of the Maryland football program. And it still hasn't stopped spinning. In recent weeks, linebacker Ryan Donohue, running back Gary Douglas and quarterback Tyler Smith announced plans to transfer, while fullbacks Haroon Brown and Taylor Watson — both of whom are graduating — decided they wouldn't return for their final season of eligibility. It's the type of attrition one might expect from a coaching change.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Collegiate sports are filled with statistics, some meaningful, some not. One worth watching is a school's academic progress rate. Compiled by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, it is based on the number of team members who stay enrolled and academically eligible. In short, it measures the athletes' progress toward graduation. Lately, these numbers for University of Maryland football players have been sorry — the team's academic progress rate has dropped for five years in a row. In the Atlantic Coast Conference rankings, the Terps are almost in the cellar in this category, ahead of only Florida State University.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 8, 2008
I believe that if the NCAA wanted to, it could -- in conjunction with the NBA and with the blessing of the fans -- give players reason to attend school, stay for a while and get some real educational benefit from it, including a degree. I also believe that the NCAA isn't even remotely interested in accomplishing any of that, except where it gets the organization more money and a better reputation. Same for the NBA. As for the fans, they care deeply about graduation rates and the annual Academic Progress Rate right up until the time their favorite team makes a Final Four run. If the powers-that-be in college sports really cared about the players' "academic progress," they would seek to function less as moneymakers for the NCAA itself and for its member schools and less as the NBA's minor league.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 1994
Education Alternatives, the Minneapolis company that manages public schools for profit, says it has overstated the academic progress of students attending the schools it manages in Baltimore.In an admission that is sure to fuel the debate over the privatization of public schools, Education Alternatives said yesterday its error in reporting the Baltimore test scores had been "completely unintentional." It corrected the error yesterday; the mistake was reported last weekend by the Minneapolis Star Tribune.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
The National Collegiate Athletic Association took its first step toward serious academic reform yesterday with the release of a ground-breaking - albeit in some cases flawed - report that tracked the progress of scholarship athletes during the 2003-04 school year. Teams that don't improve their academic performance during the current school year could lose scholarships when the next report is released in December. Annual reporting eventually will monitor academic performance over a four-year period, and the reform's architects say habitually under-performing schools have time to straighten their priorities.
SPORTS
By JEFF BARKER and JEFF BARKER,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
The NCAA yesterday penalized 123 colleges and universities, including Morgan State, for having athletic teams that fell short of academic guidelines. The University of Maryland men's basketball team was below the cutoff score but wasn't penalized because players who left without graduating had already exhausted their eligibility. Nationally, men's basketball programs were the chief offenders. Morgan State was punished with the loss of 1.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 7, 2008
The alarmist can only wag his finger. The Maryland men's basketball team has the worst academic score of any Atlantic Coast Conference school. It's also the worst of any of Maryland's 27 sports teams. The realist can only shake his head. In all, men's basketball teams from 124 Division I schools posted insufficient grades in the NCAA's latest report card - its annual Academic Progress Rate report. The basketball fan can only shrug his shoulders. What does it all mean? Either basketball players are dumb as rocks for taking a free education for granted, college coaches are sleazeballs for pretending they care, or everyone else is naive for thinking grades still matter.
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