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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
Once sleepy places in July and August, Baltimore-area independent schools and their campuses now buzz all summer with activity -- and nearly as many youngsters as during the school year.They are home to camps specializing in sports from wrestling to water polo, activities from art to etiquette, and academic programs that try to catch kids up, keep them from slipping behind or push them a step ahead.As camping has grown into a multibillion-dollar industry nationwide, private schools have found a niche, providing supervised, enriching activities while opening campuses to a broad audience and generating cash.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 8, 2014
Baltimore school officials want to attract more highly effective teachers and raise awareness about attendance in summer school after the percentage of middle and high school students successfully completing academic programs plummeted last year. The number of middle school students promoted to the next grade fell precipitously, according to data recently released by the school system, spurring questions about the effectiveness of the Building Educated Leaders for Life program. Building Educated Leaders for Life, referred to by its acronym BELL, a national model that had previously posted encouraging results, runs the city's middle school summer program.
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NEWS
June 14, 1995
The Anne Arundel Community College board of trustees voted unanimously last night to cut four academic programs from the curriculum.Effective this fall, students will not be allowed to sign up for manufacturing, engineering, and systems engineering degree programs. The systems engineering certificate program was also cut from the school. Students already in those four programs will be permitted to complete them.College officials said they decided to target the four programs that were eliminated because they were among the most expensive per student and have had low enrollment in recent years.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
A proposal for Morgan State University to offer joint academic programs with Towson University is drawing objections from some Morgan officials who believe such a setup would benefit Towson far more than the Baltimore institution. The plan, which is in the early stages, emerged just months after a judge ordered the state and the state's four historically black colleges, including Morgan, into mediation to settle alleged disparities in funding and duplication of programs at historically black institutions by other state colleges and universities.
NEWS
December 2, 1996
Anne Arundel Community College has named Shad B. Ewart as program coordinator for its business and business technologies division.Ewart comes to the Arnold post from nine years at Mount Vernon College, where he served the Continuing Studies division for the past four years as director of academic programs in business and training.Ewart will be responsible for assisting with the design, development and implementation of the degree and certificate programs in business management and business and public administration.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | May 18, 2007
Centennial High School flexed its academic muscles last weekend when it won the Baltimore metropolitan region "It's Academic" championship. Tomorrow, the three-member team will attempt to defeat teams from Washington and Virginia in the "It's Academic" Super Bowl. The competition, which begins at 11:15 a.m., will be held at the WRC-TV station in Northwest Washington. Centennial team members are seniors Faith Zhang (captain), who will attend Harvard in the fall; Ari Seifter, who will attend the University of Pennsylvania; and Shyam Srinivasan, who will attend California Institute of Technology.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
College administrator named to state panelDr. Diane. K. Troyer, vice president of academic affairs and student services at Harford Community College, was appointedrecently to the Maryland Higher Education Commission's Student Transfer Advisory Committee.Ms. Troyer, chief academic officer of Harford Community College, provides the academic and administrative leadership required to achieve excellence in instruction, academic programs, and services. She is responsible for curriculum, instruction and student services.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | November 20, 1991
A panel of University of Maryland regents acted yesterday to restore money for 30 faculty and 675 students in the schools of law and social work in Baltimore next fall. The schools were slated for major reductions in a 1993 budget proposal that passed earlier.At the behest of Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg, the regents' finance committee approved a plan to redirect $3 million from building repairs, merit pay raises and an enhancement plan for the medical school to support already employed faculty and existing academic programs on the professional schools campus.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Harford Community College is considering raising tuition, dropping some academic programs, reducing staff and limiting enrollment as a result of expected state cutbacks."
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
The Baltimore school system's second-highest ranking official sent a letter yesterday to state and local lawmakers, saying that the school system's deficit cannot be blamed on academic programs added in the last few years. Cassandra W. Jones, the school system's chief academic officer and last remaining top official from the previous administration, said that schools chief Bonnie S. Copeland, state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley told audience members at a WBAL-TV town meeting that two academic programs Jones oversaw contributed to the deficit - an assertion she said was "appalling."
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Coppin State University should enroll higher-caliber freshmen, focus more on transfer and returning students, and reorganize its academics and administration, a committee plans to report Wednesday to the University System of Maryland Board of Regents. The recommendations, from a panel convened in December to study Coppin State, are meant to turn around the stressed institution, one of Maryland's four historically black colleges and universities. The school has one of the lowest six-year graduation rates for first-time, full-time students in the country at 15 percent as of fiscal year 2012 and is underenrolled by more than 2,000 students, the committee said.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
The decision last week by Morgan State University's governing board to oust Dallas R. Evans as chairman appears to have been the culmination of a bitter struggle over the school's leadership between Mr. Evans and University President David Wilson. In December, Mr. Evans tried to orchestrate Mr. Wilson's dismissal after only 21/2 years on the job by persuading the school's 15-member Board of Regents not to renew the president's contract when it ends in June. But then an outpouring of support for Mr. Wilson from students, faculty members and community leaders forced the board to reverse its decision a few weeks later.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2012
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded nearly $500,000 for activists to offer West Baltimore children holistic services from "cradle to college to career," under the White House Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative. The Promise Neighborhoods grant, one of 17 awarded in 2012, will be used toward further development of a strategy to combat poverty in the Upton and Druid Heights neighborhoods through a collaboration of the University of Maryland School of Social Work, faith-based organizations, such as Union Baptist Church, public schools and the city's B'More for Healthy Babies, among other partners.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | November 12, 2012
Mount St. Mary's will discontinue three of its Division I athletics teams in 2013 in an effort to reduce its athletics budget while expanding its existing programs. Men's soccer, along with men's and women's golf, will cease after the 2012-13 academic year. As many as 30 Mount student-athletes will be affected by the elimination of the three sports, as well as one full-time and three part-time coaching positions. The decision will save the university more than $400,000 annually. "This is a decision we didn't want to make, but the budget realities require it to protect and reinvest in our remaining Division I programs," university President Thomas H. Powell said.
NEWS
July 24, 2012
The staff cuts Coppin State University President Reginald Avery announced last week drew protests from union members represented by the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees, along with faculty and students concerned about the direction the school is headed. Mr. Avery insists the layoffs and contract non-renewals were necessary to balance the budget and protect academic programs, but it remains to be seen whether his ambitious efforts to boost student retention and graduation rates will bear fruit.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | January 6, 1991
Elderhostel, a non-profit network with a lip-smacking smorgasbord of live-in academic programs for travelers 60 and older, served up 265,000 courses last year. And its average participant came back for a fourth helping.Since its founding in 1975, Elderhostel's enrollments have increased 15 percent to 25 percent a year, from 220 to last year's 265,000. Now other organizations and tour operators are taking note of this seemingly insatiable hunger of mature Americans for deepening their learning as they travel.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
Striving to boost the state's public colleges, Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders endorsed a move yesterday to give the University System of Maryland more autonomy.Embracing the work of a recent state task force headed by Adm. Charles R. Larson, the governor introduced legislation that would free the 11-campus system from key regulatory oversight.But Glendening declined, for now, to allocate an additional $27 million in state funding that the task force had suggested be spent on the University System to improve academic programs.
NEWS
July 23, 2012
The NCAA this morning announced stiff penalties on the Penn State football program, acting with unprecedented swiftness in response to a report detailing the repeated failure of officials there to act appropriately in response to long-time assistant coach Jerry Sandusky's serial child sexual abuse. The football team, already reeling from the scandal and the firing and subsequent death of legendary coach Joe Paterno, faces a four-year ban on post-season appearances, a $60 million fine and the vacating of all its victories from 1998-2011, the time period when officials knew about Mr. Sandusky's crimes but failed to stop them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Coming unstuck in time, Pamela Regis was investigating the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. When the clocks struck 13, she dreamt she went to ... to Manderley? — no, McDaniel. Strange as it might seem, Regis' dream of jumbled-up literary genres will come true this August. In a manner of speaking. Aided by grants totaling $200,000 from the Nora Roberts Foundation, McDaniel College in Westminster is about to launch what is possibly the nation's first academic minor in genre fiction: horror, sci-fi, romance, fantasy, mystery and Westerns, as well as graphic novels.
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