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By american news service | June 18, 1998
NEWARK, N.J. - Third-year medical student Juan Carlos Ramos and his mentor, Dr. Carlos Molina, share Spanish as a common language and cancer research as their professional interest, and each has achieved distinction in the medical field. They are also among the few medical professionals with minority backgrounds who have chosen academic, instead of practical, medicine.While the number of minority physicians has steadily climbed, minorities still represent less than 4 percent of all U.S. medical school faculty, say the nonprofit National Medical Fellowships and Bristol-Meyers Squibb Co., which are trying to address the imbalance.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System leadership sent this letter today outlining how much federal budget cuts will cost the medical system.   From:  Paul B. Rothman and Ronald R. Peterson [ mailto:jhmedexec@jhmi.edu ]  Sent:  Friday, March 01, 2013 1:50 PM To: Subject:  Update on Sequestration To JHM faculty, staff and students Dear Colleagues,   Yesterday's decision on sequestration and its impact on academic medicine have reverberated throughout our halls.
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Through a series of steps small and large, the Johns Hopkins University Department of Medicine appears to have made major advances in five years to reverse decades of poor results in retaining and promoting female faculty members.The department, the university's largest, was able to change course without involving "set asides" or quotas, according to a report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.The study's authors said the gains resulted from moves to ensure that women were treated more fairly and generally felt welcomed by the traditionally male department.
NEWS
By american news service | June 18, 1998
NEWARK, N.J. - Third-year medical student Juan Carlos Ramos and his mentor, Dr. Carlos Molina, share Spanish as a common language and cancer research as their professional interest, and each has achieved distinction in the medical field. They are also among the few medical professionals with minority backgrounds who have chosen academic, instead of practical, medicine.While the number of minority physicians has steadily climbed, minorities still represent less than 4 percent of all U.S. medical school faculty, say the nonprofit National Medical Fellowships and Bristol-Meyers Squibb Co., which are trying to address the imbalance.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System leadership sent this letter today outlining how much federal budget cuts will cost the medical system.   From:  Paul B. Rothman and Ronald R. Peterson [ mailto:jhmedexec@jhmi.edu ]  Sent:  Friday, March 01, 2013 1:50 PM To: Subject:  Update on Sequestration To JHM faculty, staff and students Dear Colleagues,   Yesterday's decision on sequestration and its impact on academic medicine have reverberated throughout our halls.
NEWS
May 11, 1997
Issues at Maryland Medical SchoolI am writing to comment on the news story of April 25 by David Folkenflik, headlined, "UM School of Medicine ousts 3 top officials." In it, Dr. Donald E. Wilson, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, was criticized by several anonymous faculty members.I am an assistant professor and director of optometry services, in the department of ophthalmology and I take issue with these unnamed colleagues.As Mr. Folkenflik appropriately pointed out, there are unprecedented, ubiquitous financial pressures on academic medical centers due to the current climate of health care reimbursement.
NEWS
November 17, 2008
* Saint Agnes Hospital has named Dr. James P. Richardson as the new chief of geriatric medicine. In this new position, Dr. Richardson will concentrate on the care of older adults, devoting the majority of his time to outpatient and inpatient consultations for geriatric patients. Richardson graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he also completed a residency in family medicine. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of dementia, frailty, frequent falls and other geriatric syndromes.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | February 16, 2007
Grey's Anatomy, look out. The medical doctors of Johns Hopkins Hospital are headed back to prime time on ABC. In 2000, ABC News premiered Hopkins 24/7, a groundbreaking exploration of life and death stories at one of the world's great medical institutions. Attracting an audience of as many as 12 million viewers an episode and winning several major awards, the six-part, cinema-verite series proved that great documentary filmmaking could succeed in the highly commercialized climate of network television.
NEWS
By DONALD E. WILSON | February 25, 1993
In 1969, African-Americans made up approximately 6 percent ofthe freshman class in U.S. medical schools. In 1991, that percentage had risen to only 6.6 percent. For nearly 20 years, the number of African-American students entering medical school has remained static, with almost one-third concentrated in 10 medical schools.Last year, the Association of American Medical Colleges launched ''Project 3000 by 2000,'' an effort to nearly double the number of minority students enrolled in medical schools by the turn of the century.
NEWS
April 9, 1996
TRUSTEES fantasizing credentials for a new president of the Johns Hopkins University might require someone who was simultaneously a physician, engineer, entrepreneur, university medical administrator, university trustee and amateur musician. One might assume there is no such person, but the trustees have just chosen Dr. William R. Brody, with exactly that resume, to be the 13th president of the university.He has been there before, with a foot in medicine and engineering, and knows what he is getting into.
NEWS
May 11, 1997
Issues at Maryland Medical SchoolI am writing to comment on the news story of April 25 by David Folkenflik, headlined, "UM School of Medicine ousts 3 top officials." In it, Dr. Donald E. Wilson, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, was criticized by several anonymous faculty members.I am an assistant professor and director of optometry services, in the department of ophthalmology and I take issue with these unnamed colleagues.As Mr. Folkenflik appropriately pointed out, there are unprecedented, ubiquitous financial pressures on academic medical centers due to the current climate of health care reimbursement.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Through a series of steps small and large, the Johns Hopkins University Department of Medicine appears to have made major advances in five years to reverse decades of poor results in retaining and promoting female faculty members.The department, the university's largest, was able to change course without involving "set asides" or quotas, according to a report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.The study's authors said the gains resulted from moves to ensure that women were treated more fairly and generally felt welcomed by the traditionally male department.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
Dr. ROSCOE ROSS "Ike" ROBINSON, 74, died on Saturday, August 7 after a lengthy illness. A 1954 graduate of the University of Oklahoma Medical School, Dr. Robinson received his post-graduate training at Duke University and Columbia University. He then spent 24 years working at Duke, where he started and headed its first Division of Nephrology and where he later served as the Chief Executive Officer of Duke Hospital. In 1981, Dr. Robinson came to Vanderbilt as Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, a position he held until 1997.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 25, 2007
Historically, young males have had a significant edge over girls in a wide range of risky behaviors, among them, binge drinking and failure to wear seat belts. As a result, young men have been far more likely than young women to die in car crashes. Now, according to emergency department physicians from University of California Irvine Medical Center, boys still drink, fail to use seat belts and die in car crashes more often than girls, but girls began to narrow the gap in all measures between 1995 and 2004.
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