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NEWS
May 7, 2000
Academic, activity and leadership awards were presented April 16 to freshmen, sophomores and juniors, including five local students, at the annual Spring Awards Ceremony at Western Maryland College. Honored were: Diana Pool of New Windsor, a sophomore and consistent dean's list student, was given the Jean Alpaugh Award for Interdisciplinary Study for appreciating cross-cultural experiences. An honors English major, Alpaugh excelled in anthropology, photography, art, history and music.
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NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Twelve University of Maryland undergraduates have been accused of using Web-equipped cell phones or handheld organizers to cheat on a business school final exam last month, according to the school's student-run Honor Council. Six of them have admitted to misconduct during that same test, the council said. The allegations prompted Provost William W. Destler to issue a warning to faculty members about the potential misuse of cell phones and other common handheld electronics, said J. Andrew Cantor, a 20-year-old senior and chairman of the Honor Council.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | July 12, 2008
After a cheating scandal last year landed an Anne Arundel County high school in hot water with the College Board, the atmosphere of Advanced Placement testing there changed drastically, said recent graduate Sage Snider. Instead of chattering and toting schoolbooks for a last-minute peek before the national exams this spring, she said, Severna Park High School students silently entered the rooms and carried nothing but calculators. All other materials were banned. "It was very, very different, and everybody knew why," said Snider, who on June 30 finished her term as the student representative on the county school board.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | July 12, 2008
After a cheating scandal last year landed an Anne Arundel County high school in hot water with the College Board, the atmosphere of Advanced Placement testing there changed drastically, said recent graduate Sage Snider. Instead of chattering and toting schoolbooks for a last-minute peek before the national exams this spring, she said, Severna Park High School students silently entered the rooms and carried nothing but calculators. All other materials were banned. "It was very, very different, and everybody knew why," said Snider, who on June 30 finished her term as the student representative on the county school board.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
In Calculus III in Room 211 at Krieger Hall, the Johns Hopkins University mathematics professor and his students were stumped yesterday -- not by the intricate world of vector analysis or multiple variables but by the universal question: What is fair?In a highly unusual forum, Professor John Michael Boardman led a discussion with more than 50 students about allegations of misconduct that cast a pall over the class' three-hour final last week. The forum raised broader questions about ethics at the esteemed university and a competitive environment that some students say encourages academic success at almost any cost.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Edward Lee contributed to this article | September 23, 1994
About midmorning tomorrow, Carrie Wann will stand with 200 other freshmen at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and repeat the school's honor pledge: "I shall try to follow all truth, I shall try to see all beauty, I shall try to be all goodness. . . ."With that, Miss Wann will be initiated into the Notre Dame academic community. In return for her vow, Notre Dame will welcome her to the fold, dress her in an academic gown for the first time and promise not to "proctor" her examinations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Gottlieb and Jeff Gottlieb,Los Angeles Times | January 24, 2000
Paul Chwelos teaches information systems at the University of California, Irvine, so he knows better than most the power of the Internet. And not just the way it is affecting businesses, but also the way it affects his graduate students. "It certainly gives them the ability to do better research, but it makes it easier to cheat," he said. "I think it's naive to think the Internet has given such access to information and that it doesn't increase cheating as well." So this month Chwelos joined a growing number of professors who are using the Internet to fight back.
NEWS
By Kevin M. Brien | May 4, 2014
Twenty-two years ago at the end of a semester of teaching an Intro to Philosophy course, I received an unforgettable wake-up call on the issue of plagiarism. During the reading period between the final class session and the final exam, I discovered two blatant cases of plagiarized papers - I knew the books from which these papers had been copied whole cloth. So on exam day, and with apologies to those uninvolved, I brought the issue into the open. Without naming the offenders, I told the class that I expected the students who plagiarized to meet with me privately.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz and Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Howard County school officials announced yesterday that they will launch a sweeping examination of the academic eligibility of high school athletes after an investigation into improper grade-changing at Columbia's Oakland Mills High School uncovered 16 ineligible students participating in activities ranging from varsity football to cheerleading. The teams with unqualified members will have to forfeit all season wins, and the school's athletic director, Ken Hovet, has been "relieved of his responsibilities," schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke said yesterday.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
Much is positive at Howard High How wonderful it was to read about Howard High School's latest accomplishment in Tricia Bishop's article entitled "Battling to outsmart the field" (Jan. 11). Congratulations to the Howard High students, faculty and parents who played a role as the It's Academic Team earned a guaranteed spot in the National Scholastic Championship in June. This is one of many successes that has occurred at Howard High since designated in September 2003 as a school in need of improvement (SIU)
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz and Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Howard County school officials announced yesterday that they will launch a sweeping examination of the academic eligibility of high school athletes after an investigation into improper grade-changing at Columbia's Oakland Mills High School uncovered 16 ineligible students participating in activities ranging from varsity football to cheerleading. The teams with unqualified members will have to forfeit all season wins, and the school's athletic director, Ken Hovet, has been "relieved of his responsibilities," schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz and Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Howard County school officials announced yesterday that they will launch a sweeping examination of the academic eligibility of high school athletes after an investigation into improper grade-changing at Columbia's Oakland Mills High School uncovered 16 ineligible students participating in activities ranging from varsity football to cheerleading. The teams with unqualified members will have to forfeit all season wins, and the school's athletic director, Ken Hovet, has been "relieved of his responsibilities," schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke said yesterday.
NEWS
By Nadia Lerner and By Nadia Lerner,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
Students caught cheating on tests or plagiarizing papers once faced the possibility of getting a zero on the test, failing a course or, at the very least, humiliation. Not now. A nationwide study indicates that students not only have no qualms about cheating, but that often teachers close their eyes to it. The survey was conducted by Rutgers University professor Donald L. McCabe, founder and president of the Center for Academic Integrity. This national association of more than 250 colleges is dedicated to fostering scholastic honesty.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Twelve University of Maryland undergraduates have been accused of using Web-equipped cell phones or handheld organizers to cheat on a business school final exam last month, according to the school's student-run Honor Council. Six of them have admitted to misconduct during that same test, the council said. The allegations prompted Provost William W. Destler to issue a warning to faculty members about the potential misuse of cell phones and other common handheld electronics, said J. Andrew Cantor, a 20-year-old senior and chairman of the Honor Council.
NEWS
May 7, 2000
Academic, activity and leadership awards were presented April 16 to freshmen, sophomores and juniors, including five local students, at the annual Spring Awards Ceremony at Western Maryland College. Honored were: Diana Pool of New Windsor, a sophomore and consistent dean's list student, was given the Jean Alpaugh Award for Interdisciplinary Study for appreciating cross-cultural experiences. An honors English major, Alpaugh excelled in anthropology, photography, art, history and music.
NEWS
By Nadia Lerner and By Nadia Lerner,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
Students caught cheating on tests or plagiarizing papers once faced the possibility of getting a zero on the test, failing a course or, at the very least, humiliation. Not now. A nationwide study indicates that students not only have no qualms about cheating, but that often teachers close their eyes to it. The survey was conducted by Rutgers University professor Donald L. McCabe, founder and president of the Center for Academic Integrity. This national association of more than 250 colleges is dedicated to fostering scholastic honesty.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz and Tricia Bishop and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Howard County school officials announced yesterday that they will launch a sweeping examination of the academic eligibility of high school athletes after an investigation into improper grade-changing at Columbia's Oakland Mills High School uncovered 16 ineligible students participating in activities ranging from varsity football to cheerleading. The teams with unqualified members will have to forfeit all season wins, and the school's athletic director, Ken Hovet, has been "relieved of his responsibilities," schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Gottlieb and Jeff Gottlieb,Los Angeles Times | January 24, 2000
Paul Chwelos teaches information systems at the University of California, Irvine, so he knows better than most the power of the Internet. And not just the way it is affecting businesses, but also the way it affects his graduate students. "It certainly gives them the ability to do better research, but it makes it easier to cheat," he said. "I think it's naive to think the Internet has given such access to information and that it doesn't increase cheating as well." So this month Chwelos joined a growing number of professors who are using the Internet to fight back.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
In Calculus III in Room 211 at Krieger Hall, the Johns Hopkins University mathematics professor and his students were stumped yesterday -- not by the intricate world of vector analysis or multiple variables but by the universal question: What is fair?In a highly unusual forum, Professor John Michael Boardman led a discussion with more than 50 students about allegations of misconduct that cast a pall over the class' three-hour final last week. The forum raised broader questions about ethics at the esteemed university and a competitive environment that some students say encourages academic success at almost any cost.
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