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NEWS
February 26, 2014
Johns Hopkins University student Bridget Kustin, reacting to the appointment of a new Task Force on Academic Freedom, challenged ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,'" Feb. 25) certain events in the university's history and recent occurrences as they relate to academic freedom and other issues. I welcome the challenge which was offered by Ms. Kustin in the spirit of the free and open debate that is the hallmark of scholarly life at Johns Hopkins and across academia. Hers is only one of what I hope will be many voices heard as the new task force works in coming months to codify in writing the principles of academic freedom that have guided Johns Hopkins from its founding.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014
There has been a lot of heated rhetoric recently about the American Studies Association boycott of Israel and academic freedom and a lot of wild accusations being tossed around, but on thing seems to be missing from this whole brouhaha ( "A chilling effect," March 10). People keep talking about "discrimination," but there doesn't seem to be any realization of who exactly is being discriminated against, with both supporters of Israel and supporters of academia claiming to be the "victims.
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NEWS
March 7, 2010
Obviously, political correctness trumps academic freedom and the First Amendment, and isn't it delicious to observe the squirming from a bastion of the inherent conflict ("Towson adjunct professor fired for racial remark in class," Mar. 3)? To add spice to the sauce, we enjoy the shuckin' and jivin' from the educator-bureaucrat-elitists as they pontificate from their tower of babble. Dave Reich, Perry Hall Send letters to the editor to talkback@baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
I would like to disagree with your editorial "A chilling effect" (March 10). I believe that the central issue here is academic freedom. The American Studies Association (ASA), in theory an academic organization devoted to the study of the United States, has violated the essence of academic freedom, which is based on the free flow of ideas, by supporting a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. By calling for the elimination of ties with Israeli colleges and universities, the ASA has taken a political stand which undermines academic freedom.
NEWS
By Bridget Kustin | February 24, 2014
"Freedom of expression is the heartbeat of our university," Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels and Provost Robert C. Lieberman declared in an email this month announcing a new Task Force on Academic Freedom that will formulate an "official set of principles that can give expression to our core values in this area. " The email makes the case for JHU's "special kinship with academic freedom" through one particular example: Philosophy professor Arthur Lovejoy's disagreement with a trustee while at Stanford had earned him a "troublemaker" reputation, but JHU hired him anyway.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
While the main campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is open and inviting, there is another division of the school that discourages visitors. The Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is tucked miles away in Laurel, with building access blocked by guards. Outsiders enter with an approved escort for the most part, handing over proof of identity first. Much of what goes on in there is secret — including some of the billions of dollars in work the lab does for the federal government.
NEWS
By Richard T. Ingram | September 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - The University of Maryland's decision to assign freshmen to read a play on the killing of gay college student Matthew Shepard comes on the heels of a successful resolution of a similar controversy at the University of North Carolina. The decision by higher education leaders in Chapel Hill to press on with a class-wide reading assignment of a book about the Quran, despite opposition from certain Christian activists and legislators, was a victory for academic freedom. But both of these episodes are part of an ongoing larger conflict about the responsibilities of public universities in a free society.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | February 17, 2005
PROFESSOR WARD Churchill of the University of Colorado seems to be enjoying his 15 minutes of infamy for his childish rants against people who were killed in the 9/11 attacks. Others, of course, resent his cheap shots at the dead, and some are trying to get him fired. The resulting controversy has wider implications for the understanding - and misunderstanding - of what is meant by "academic freedom." However symptomatic Mr. Churchill may be of what is wrong with academia today, his situation has nothing to do with academic freedom.
NEWS
By George Bisharat | September 17, 2007
Two hundred thousand Palestinian children began school in the Gaza Strip this month without a full complement of textbooks. Why? Because Israel, which maintains a stranglehold over this small strip of land along the Mediterranean even after withdrawing its settlers from there in 2005, considers paper, ink and binding materials not to be "fundamental humanitarian needs." Israel, attempting to throttle the democratically elected Hamas government, generally permits only food, medicine and fuel to enter Gaza, and allows virtually no Palestinian exports to leave.
NEWS
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 28, 2003
CHICAGO - Should homosexuals be hired as teachers? One outspoken Internet pundit says no. But his opinion has fueled a controversy over academic freedom of expression because it is posted on a site maintained by the writer's employer, a state university. Hiring gay teachers "puts the fox into the chicken coop," Eric Rasmusen wrote on his Web log, or "blog," on Aug. 26. "Male homosexuals, at least, like boys and are generally promiscuous," he continued. "They should not be given the opportunity to satisfy their desires."
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The decisions taken by the American Studies Association, a small, relatively obscure scholarly organization devoted to the study of American history and culture, rarely resonate much beyond the ivied walls of academe. But earlier this year the group created an unaccustomed stir when its members voted to endorse a boycott of Israeli academic institutions as a way of protesting that country's treatment of Palestinians. Supporters of the Jewish state were quick to denounce the move as anti-Semitic and anti-Israel, a charge the ASA denied.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
My congratulations to Bridget Kustin, founder of the Johns Hopkins University Human Rights Working Group, on her commentary ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,' Feb. 25). It took courage to write that op-ed while still a student at Hopkins. While sincerely hoping she does not suffer repercussions, I want to note that academic institutions are either hurting for money or are greedy for it. Universities, even the ones with big endowments, act as though they cannot afford to host intellectual ferment, bold dissent and revolutionary ideas.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
Bridget Kustin slandered the late Professor Arthur O. Lovejoy when she wrote that he "embraced McCarthyism" ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,'" Feb. 25). He did not. I speak as a student activist at Johns Hopkins University during the McCarthy years. Many students and faculty spoke out to defend Owen Lattimore from U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy's attacks. Professor Lovejoy was elderly and reticent in those years (the early 1950s), but he was definitely on our pro-Lattimore side. Ms. Kustin is identified as a Ph.D.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
Johns Hopkins University student Bridget Kustin, reacting to the appointment of a new Task Force on Academic Freedom, challenged ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,'" Feb. 25) certain events in the university's history and recent occurrences as they relate to academic freedom and other issues. I welcome the challenge which was offered by Ms. Kustin in the spirit of the free and open debate that is the hallmark of scholarly life at Johns Hopkins and across academia. Hers is only one of what I hope will be many voices heard as the new task force works in coming months to codify in writing the principles of academic freedom that have guided Johns Hopkins from its founding.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 24, 2014
Cancel the philosophy courses, people. Oh, and we're going to be shuttering the political science, religion and pre-law departments too. We'll keep some of the English and history folks on for a while longer, but they should probably keep their resumés handy. Because, you see, they are of no use anymore. We have the answers to the big questions, so why keep pretending there's anything left to discuss? At least that's where Erin Ching, a student at Swarthmore College, seems to be coming down.
NEWS
By Bridget Kustin | February 24, 2014
"Freedom of expression is the heartbeat of our university," Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels and Provost Robert C. Lieberman declared in an email this month announcing a new Task Force on Academic Freedom that will formulate an "official set of principles that can give expression to our core values in this area. " The email makes the case for JHU's "special kinship with academic freedom" through one particular example: Philosophy professor Arthur Lovejoy's disagreement with a trustee while at Stanford had earned him a "troublemaker" reputation, but JHU hired him anyway.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2003
DENVER - Worried that left-wing professors are using college classrooms to bully those who don't toe the liberal line, a Colorado politician says it may be time to pass a law protecting students who hold more conservative or religious views. Republican state Senate President John Andrews recently sent a letter to Colorado's 29 public colleges and universities, asking them to explain how they handle cases of ideological discrimination and how they promote diverse points of view. Their answers are due Monday.
NEWS
By THE SEATTLE TIMES | December 26, 2001
College professors are decrying a national report that castigates them for criticizing the United States in the aftermath of Sept. 11, saying it reads like a blueprint for a blacklist. The report, published by the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, details more than 100 examples of what its authors call a prevailing "blame America first" sentiment on college campuses. The politically well-connected nonprofit association, founded in 1995 by Lynne Cheney, the wife of Vice President Dick Cheney, believes American students are graduating without a proper appreciation for what makes America great.
NEWS
February 16, 2014
I applaud Melanie McAlister for her reasoned commentary on the Israel academic boycott movement ( "Maryland bills would stifle academic freedom," Feb. 12). As Ms. McAlister notes, "in considering the ASA boycott decision, it's important to recognize that whether or not one thinks it was a good idea, it does not violate the academic freedom of Israeli or American scholars. " What would violate this freedom is a bill under consideration by the Maryland General Assembly that seeks to criminalize free speech concerning this matter.
NEWS
February 16, 2014
I am thankful that Melani McAlister, an associate professor at George Washington University, is brave enough to write about the attempt to stifle the American Studies Association ("Maryland bills would stifle academic freedom," Feb. 12). Those of us who are opposing Israeli apartheid are being called anti-Semites. Nothing could be farther from the truth. An anti-apartheid stance is based not on nationality but on ethics. Zionists need to learn the golden rule: Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. Janice Kelly - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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