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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
The public service video produced by the Maryland National Guard on sexual assault begins like others. There's footage of troops training in the field. A narrator warns of predators within the ranks. A succession of leaders discusses the impact of assaults on service members and their teams. Then Brig. Gen. Linda Singh comes on the screen. "Speaking from personal experience, and having been sexually molested as a teenager, I sought out what I thought was the right support structure," the commander of the Maryland Army National Guard says.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
A 39-year-old man was found guilty Wednesday of sexually abusing a teenage girl in Crofton between 2010 and 2012, according to the county's State's Attorney's Office. John Michael Winner was found guilty of one count of sex abuse of a minor and four counts of second-degree forcible rape, according to a news release. The State's Attorney's Office had alleged that over a two-year span between spring 2010 and late fall 2012, Winner abused the girl at two Crofton residences. Winner has denied the charges, according to The Capital.
NEWS
By Bruce Friedrich | May 28, 2014
Three years ago, I joined six of my friends in passing out vegetarian recipes and information at the Inner Harbor. Baltimore City Police officers ordered us to stop and demanded that we leave the property, under threat of arrest. So last week, we sued those officers for violating our constitutional rights. We had a First Amendment right to pass out literature at the Inner Harbor, and we had proof of our right to be there - the property management company's specific guidelines - which the officers refused to acknowledge.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
The U.S. Court of Appeals in March upheld a judge's decision last summer to dismiss three sexual abuse cases against Kevin Clash, the Dundalk native who served as the voice of Sesame Street's "Elmo" puppet. In affirming the lower court's ruling, the appeals court said it "considered all the plaintiff's arguments relevant to the accrual of their claims under the discovery rule and find them to be without merit," according to court documents filed last week by Clash's lawyer, Michael G. Berger.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Trust John Waters to never go for the easy choice. "Abuse of Weakness," the latest work from controversial French filmmaker Catherine Breillat, is Waters' pick for this year's Maryland Film Festival, set for May 7-11, largely in the Station North Arts District. The film, which is getting its Maryland premiere, stars Isabelle Huppert as a director who, after suffering a stroke, is victimized by a notorious con man. It is based on a similar incident that happened to Breillat, who spent five months in a hospital recovering from a 2004 stroke.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Betting on dice on the streets of Baltimore or wagering on favorite sports teams may seem innocuous behavior for city teenagers, but it can serve as a gateway to heavier gambling and other risky behavior, impairing lives for years to come. These are the findings of researchers at the Johns Hopkins University who repeatedly surveyed a group of up to 798 disadvantaged teenagers beginning in 2004. The latest results culled from the surveys linked gambling among the youth to early sex, sometimes resulting in pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 15, 2014
A Baltimore city police officer and Columbia resident was indicted last week on multiple sex offense charges by a Howard County Grand Jury, a county State's Attorney spokesman announced Tuesday. Charles William Hagee, 44, of the 8800 block of Goose Landing Circle, was indicted on three third-degree sex offense charges, a charge of sexual solicitation of a minor, and three counts of prostitution, according to court documents. Hagee was arrested in March by Howard County police when they received a tip regarding the prostitution of a 14-year-old girl in Columbia.  Police said detectives believe Hagee contacted the girl through a phone number posted to an online prostitution advertisement, and that the two exchanged text messages before meeting at his Columbia home and engaging in sexual activity.
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
A science teacher at Archbishop Curley High School accused of engaging in sexual activity with a student was charged Friday with sexual abuse of a minor. Lynette Nicole Trotta, 33, is being held in jail on a $100,000 bail; her initial bail had been $250,000 but was reduced by a judge. She has also been suspended from work. School officials learned about the allegations from a librarian on Tuesday and worked with police to investigate, according to a statement released by the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sharon Sloane | March 31, 2014
America has crossed a few ominous thresholds that should give us pause. For one, poisonings are killing more people than car crashes in the United States, making them the leading cause of accidental death in the country for the first time. The vast majority of those deaths are from legal, prescription drugs. Second, more children report having been tormented and harassed online than in "real-life"; 43 percent of kids claim to be victims of such cyber-bullying. According to Yale University, victims of bullying are nearly 10 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims.
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