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Abuse

HEALTH
January 28, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration is calling on pharmaceutical firms to give more attention to the potential for abuse of new drugs when subjecting them to pre-market testing. The agency this week released a draft of new voluntary guidelines to assist drug makers in figuring out which compounds should be placed under the Controlled Substances Act, which regulates the handling, record-keeping and dispensing of controlled substances. The guidelines urge researchers to look beyond traditional indicators such as whether a compound is addictive to other characteristics that could lead to abuse.
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NEWS
July 18, 2007
The agreement by the Los Angeles Archdiocese to pay $660 million to more than 500 sexual abuse victims is a record amount that pushes the total that the American Roman Catholic Church has paid as a result of clergy sex abuse to more than $2 billion. But from the tearful acceptances by some of the victims, it's clear that money alone cannot ease the pain and suffering they have endured. The church must continue to confront this issue and come clean - not only with past victims, but with itself - in order to prevent more abuse.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
A 43-year-old Columbia man was sentenced in U.S. District in Baltimore Thursday for sexually abusing and taking explicit photos of a teenage girl, officials said. U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett sentenced Philip Wayne Barto to 20 years in prison, followed by five years of supervised release, and required him to register as a sex offender, according to a statement from the U. S. State's Attorney's office. According to his plea agreement, Barto sexually abused the girl, in addition to taking photos of her and showing her images of child pornography.
NEWS
March 20, 1991
New technologies always hold the potential for abuse, but the growth of 900-number phone services -- in which customers pay a fee for each call -- is producing an angry consumer backlash. That backlash, in turn, could easily produce regulation that would strangle legitimate aspects of this rapidly growing business.900 numbers are useful for obtaining information, as well as for fund raising or polling services. The Red Cross has used them to provide information about earthquakes and hurricanes.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Kelley Currin recalled dancing with her longtime swimming coach, Rick Curl, as a teenage girl the night of his wedding some 30 years ago. She wore a pink dress, held on too long and whispered in his ear, "I hate you. " She told Montgomery County Circuit Judge Marielsa A. Bernard on Thursday how she fell in love with Curl, who was then 33, before her 13th birthday in the early 1980s. She recounted the details of their first kiss near a water fountain at Georgetown Preparatory School and the way years of sexual abuse altered the trajectory of her life.
NEWS
By David Balto | January 7, 2014
As Congress considers legislation aimed at limiting lawsuits filed by so-called patent "trolls" - those who collect patents solely so they can sue others for infringing upon them - there is another kind of intellectual property abuse that members should look into: patent pools. Patent pools gather patents for a particular technology that is often made up of multiple components, each with its own patent held by a different company, so that manufacturers only have to go to one source for their licensing needs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Thomas Leroy Griffin, formerly of Hagerstown and Rosedale, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court on Monday to charges he sexually abused a child to produce child pornography. Griffin, 32, began committing the abuses against his victim when she was 5 or 6 years old, according to the plea agreement, engaging in sexually explicit conduct with the child in order to produce visual depictions on at least five occasions. The victim's mother discovered a videotape documenting the abuse last December.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
A 39-year-old man was found guilty Wednesday of sexually abusing a teenage girl in Crofton between 2010 and 2012, according to the county's State's Attorney's Office. John Michael Winner was found guilty of one count of sex abuse of a minor and four counts of second-degree forcible rape, according to a news release. The State's Attorney's Office had alleged that over a two-year span between spring 2010 and late fall 2012, Winner abused the girl at two Crofton residences. Winner has denied the charges, according to The Capital.
NEWS
July 4, 2013
I like Elmo as much as anyone else, but Kevin Clash was not "cleared of sexual abuse claims" as some in the media have stated ("3 sex-abuse suits against Clash, Elmo's voice, tossed," July 2). He was not exonerated or proven not guilty. The plaintiffs did not recant. The cases were dismissed in New York because the statute of limitations for civil damages in cases of sexual abuse of a minor must be brought within five years of the sexual offense. In New York, if someone doesn't heal enough within five years to be ready to identify their experience as abuse, understand its impact, realize they are not at fault, dissolve the shame they carry, feel their anger, find an attorney, and be prepared to confront their perpetrator and his or her attorney in public, they are denied their day in court.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
A former U.S. Embassy employee from the Philippines convicted of sexual abuse that took place in Baltimore was sentenced to five years in prison Thursday. Rosauro Pacubas, 58, traveled with his wife and a victim to Baltimore in March 2012, where the abuse took place in a hotel, federal prosecutors said. The victim, whose age and gender were not released, was traveling with Pacubas so that she could be evaluated for an undisclosed medical condition at a Baltimore hospital, federal prosecutors said.
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