Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAbuse Of Children
IN THE NEWS

Abuse Of Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 1994
By receiving a 145-year prison sentence, a 29-year-old Carroll County man has the dubious honor of facing the longest sentence for child sexual abuse of anyone now in the Maryland prison system. We should take comfort from the fact that he will be behind bars for decades but also realize that this century-plus sentence won't deter others from committing the same crime.Adults who sexually exploit children are psychologically twisted people. They have problems maintaining normal adult relationships.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | August 10, 2008
Statistics are more than just numbers to Kenneth Smith. Five years ago, he attended a dinner sponsored by an NFL group to raise money for a residential center for traumatized children. During the dinner, Smith said he learned that one in three girls, and one in seven boys, is sexually abused by age 18. "When I heard the statistics, I thought with those statistics, children aren't safe," said Smith, 51, of Bel Air, who has three grown children. "I felt that more needed to be done to bring the statistics out in the open."
Advertisement
NEWS
March 17, 2002
LET'S BE perfectly clear: A clerical collar should exempt no one from the law's reach in matters of child sexual abuse. Recent reports about the years of alleged abuse perpetrated by a now-defrocked priest in Boston -- and his superiors' shocking pattern of transferring him from one parish to the next -- have led to similar admissions across the country. The bishop in Palm Beach resigned after his abuse of a seminarian became public. The Diocese of Manchester, N.H., identified 14 priests accused of abuse in the past 20 years.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
IN CHARACTERIZING the Roman Catholic Church's commitment to protecting children from sexual abuse by clergy, Bishop Wilton D. Gregory talked about "solid progress." His assessment is based on an audit, released this week, of 191 dioceses in the United States that found 90 percent have established policies and procedures to safeguard children. But the true test of progress will be confirmation of the effectiveness of the programs and a decrease in the number of victims. And until that is known, parents and parishioners must remain ever vigilant.
NEWS
March 30, 1993
Edward SavitzChild sex abuse suspectPHILADELPHIA -- AIDS-infected businessman Edward Savitz,a week away from trial on charges he paid teen-age boys for sex, has died.As his health failed, Mr. Savitz, 51, was transferred from jail this month to a hospice, where he died Saturday morning -- one year and two days after his initial arrest.His lawyer, Barnaby Wittels, said Sunday his client was as good as guilty to the media, though he never had his day in court. "I hope that in heaven he will be judged more accurately than he was on earth," Mr. Wittels said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 18, 1994
Every politician got the message from the election. Or at least some message. Not the same message. A message.The Irish government tumbled down when the prime minister misled coalition partners in appointing to a judgeship the attorney general who for seven months did not extradite a priest accused of sexual abuse of children to stand trial in Northern Ireland. That's fact, not Ulster Prod fantasy.The way the Republicans are jumping all over GATT, you'd never realize it was Ronnie's baby.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 7, 1991
"Innocence Lost" is a kind of TV journalism we don't see much of these days.Rather than taking a sensational case and emphasizing its most shocking aspects, tonight's "Frontline" report, which airs at 9 on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), aims for understanding.The case examined here is one that's unfolding in Edenton, N.C., where the former owners of a day care center (Bob and Betsy Kelly), three of their employees and two other town residents are charged with 429 counts of sexual abuse of children.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | April 30, 2002
CHICAGO - At his meeting last week with American cardinals in Rome, Pope John Paul II took a tougher line than usual on the sexual abuse of children by priests. He not only declared that it is "an appalling sin" but acknowledged that it is "rightly considered a crime by society." Chicago Tribune religion reporter Julia Lieblich rightly noted, "The pope's comments Tuesday were far more forceful than typical papal pronouncements." That's what makes this one so dispiriting. Admitting that molestation of minors by adults is a crime is like recognizing that water is wet. From a leader of John Paul's vast moral authority, something far stronger and less equivocal was in order.
FEATURES
By Fred Tasker and Fred Tasker,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 18, 1995
"Lorraine," a 40-year-old Florida woman who sought professional help for depression and says she ended up convinced she had been sexually abused as a child in satanic rituals involving her father, mother and most of her kin, is preparing to sue her psychiatrist for planting those ideas."He used hypnosis," she says. "If I didn't see something, he said, 'Try harder.' He said the government is involved; they put microchips in people's noses to keep track of them."I was so needy. He really had me believing.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
IN CHARACTERIZING the Roman Catholic Church's commitment to protecting children from sexual abuse by clergy, Bishop Wilton D. Gregory talked about "solid progress." His assessment is based on an audit, released this week, of 191 dioceses in the United States that found 90 percent have established policies and procedures to safeguard children. But the true test of progress will be confirmation of the effectiveness of the programs and a decrease in the number of victims. And until that is known, parents and parishioners must remain ever vigilant.
NEWS
By Cardinal William H. Keeler | November 21, 2002
LAST WEEK, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops unequivocally affirmed our commitment that no priest who ever has sexually abused a child will be allowed to serve in ministry. And, for the first time, we approved binding church laws, called norms, requiring each bishop to live up to this standard -- reinforcing the pledge we bishops made to one another in the Dallas Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. Yet, to some, we still have not succeeded in making clear the seriousness and resolve with which we are confronting the issue of sexual abuse of children.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2002
A 28-year-old illegal immigrant convicted of molesting three young children at an apartment in Savage was sentenced yesterday to 33 years in prison. Without comment and after an emotional plea from the mother of one of the children, Howard Circuit Judge James B. Dudley imposed a series of consecutive terms on Savage resident Gerardo Cardenas for various sexual offenses committed against two girls, ages 7 and 8, and a boy, 9. The abuse occurred over a two-year period and ended when the 8-year-old girl confided in the boy, leading the boy to break his silence last summer, according to testimony at Cardenas' trial in June.
NEWS
June 29, 2002
How to stop the abuse of children Although the public is shocked by the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church, those who work to end sexual violence in our society are not. An estimated 500,000 children are sexually abused each year in the United States. In fact, one of every seven sexual assault victims is under age 6. And every year the 19 rape crisis centers in Maryland provide counseling services to thousands of children -- and adults -- who have survived sexual abuse. The impact of sexual abuse on an individual can be devastating.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | April 30, 2002
CHICAGO - At his meeting last week with American cardinals in Rome, Pope John Paul II took a tougher line than usual on the sexual abuse of children by priests. He not only declared that it is "an appalling sin" but acknowledged that it is "rightly considered a crime by society." Chicago Tribune religion reporter Julia Lieblich rightly noted, "The pope's comments Tuesday were far more forceful than typical papal pronouncements." That's what makes this one so dispiriting. Admitting that molestation of minors by adults is a crime is like recognizing that water is wet. From a leader of John Paul's vast moral authority, something far stronger and less equivocal was in order.
NEWS
March 17, 2002
LET'S BE perfectly clear: A clerical collar should exempt no one from the law's reach in matters of child sexual abuse. Recent reports about the years of alleged abuse perpetrated by a now-defrocked priest in Boston -- and his superiors' shocking pattern of transferring him from one parish to the next -- have led to similar admissions across the country. The bishop in Palm Beach resigned after his abuse of a seminarian became public. The Diocese of Manchester, N.H., identified 14 priests accused of abuse in the past 20 years.
NEWS
April 14, 1999
Abuse of children may not be declining in MarylandKate Shatzkin's article, "Conditions for Md. children mixed, survey finds" (April 7) was a welcome introduction to the "Maryland Kids Count Fact Book." However, I would caution anyone from concluding that child abuse and neglect are declining in Maryland.The Kids Count data only indicate a drop in the number of abuse and neglect cases confirmed by Child Protective Service workers. Children's advocates are greatly concerned that Child Protective Service workers are ruling out an increasingly high percentage of these cases.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
"When you get drunk, she gets smashed.""Your child has a drug problem -- you.""Substance abuse isn't a black and white issue. It's black and blue."The message is clear and the ads are hard-hitting. In a focus group of recovering alcohol and drug abusers, they often elicit a wince, averted eyes, sometimes even tears.In a TV spot, it's not easy watching a boy cowering in his room as a drunken, violent father bellows his name to order him downstairs. Or watching a mother phoning from a bar telling a daughter she'll be home when she feels like it and adding harshly, "Look, I don't need this from you."
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
Bonnie Holmes says all parents who abuse drugs or alcohol are abusing their children. So she hopes a new statewide campaign linking drug abuse to child abuse, called "Beat Your Habit -- Not Your Kid," will show people that neglect and emotional abuse of children, caused by parents' addiction, can be just as damaging."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 1998
In its own official journal, the Hare Krishna movement has published an unusually candid expose detailing widespread physical, emotional and sexual abuse of children who were sent to live in the group's boarding schools in the United States and India in the 1970s and 1980s.Parents were often unaware of the abuse because they were traveling around soliciting donations in airports and on the streets, leaving their children in the care of Hare Krishna monks and young devotees who had no training in educating children and often resented the task, the report says.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1996
Police arrested a Laurel man Friday and charged him with sexually abusing two of his girlfriend's children and at least one neighbor's child.Daniel A. Warren, 36, of the 100 block of Charlotte Drive was charged with attempted second-degree rape, second-degree sex offense and child abuse.He was being held at the county detention center on $350,000 bond.Warren's girlfriend, whom police did not identify, called authorities Friday after her 9-year-old daughter told an aunt that the man had fondled and tried to have intercourse with her on several occasions in the past several months when the two were alone.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.