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Abuse And Neglect

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By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Abuse and neglect are the dark secrets of the elderly. In nursing homes, assisted living facilities and private homes, senior citizens are beaten, robbed and left without proper food or medication, say advocates for the elderly. As a result, the Baltimore County Department of Aging has begun a yearlong campaign to urge more people to report crimes against the elderly and to teach how such acts can be prevented. The campaign - "Elder Abuse Is A Crying Shame" - began this month. The department has publicized it with billboards in Essex and Catonsville and in a brochure with a cover showing a shattered pair of eyeglasses.
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NEWS
By L. Anthony Loman | July 25, 2014
Over the past year Maryland's Department of Human Resources has begun implementing a different approach to families reported for child abuse and neglect called "Alternative Response" (AR). Also referred to as "Differential Response," similar reforms to Child Protection Services (CPS) have been implemented in other states during the past 20 years. The common theme of these reforms is a recognition that the situations of families differ substantially and that responses to child maltreatment reports should vary accordingly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Rob Hiaasen and Story by Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | September 19, 1999
Up on 'The Hill' at St. Vincent's, a new generation of children orphaned by abuse and neglect find a safe place to rage and to heal. Story by Rob Hiassen, photography by Perry Thorsvik.Fred is dead, although with an iguana it's sometimes hard to tell. But Fred the iguana is truly dead, and his passing requires a proper burial.In a few moments, everyone will gather behind the green dumpster at St. Vincent's Center. Its pastor, Father Ray Chase, will preside. He will find the right words. The 12 boys of Martin Luther King House, one of six cottages at the center, will join him at the grave site.
NEWS
By Daniel Heimpel | July 17, 2014
Earlier this month, The Baltimore Sun published an important story describing the expansion of Alternative Response (AR) across Maryland (" A new tactic to halt child abuse in Maryland ," July 5). The new system assigns child abuse and neglect cases to one of two tiered tracks based upon whether they are deemed low or high risk. High risk cases are formally investigated, low risk ones are not. While Maryland's Department of Human Resources, certain advocates, and a clot of consultants and evaluators celebrate the move to what they see as an evolution in the state's response to child abuse, they are missing - or worse, disregarding - simple documented truths that should shake any reasonable person's confidence.
NEWS
March 1, 1992
Dr. John O. Meyerhoff, chairman of the board of Parents Anonymous of Maryland, has won the Baltimore City Medical Society's 1991 Annual Community Service Award.Since becoming the agency's chairman in 1986, Dr. Meyerhoff has raised funds for the agency, worked to increase public awareness and understanding of child abuse and neglect, and increased the professional staff.He also helped develop Adolescents Coping Together, a network of support groups for troubled adolescents that now operates in 21 Baltimore public schools.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The effects of child abuse and neglect may plague victims well into their adult lives, surfacing in the form of suicide attempts, learning difficulties and trouble finding employment, an expert on criminal justice and psychology reported yesterday.These long-term emotional and educational problems may be more common than delinquency and violent criminal behavior, according tothe preliminary findings of a study that so far has involved 500 young adults, half of whom were victims of child abuse, researcher Cathy Spatz Widom said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 26, 1995
The level of violence aimed at young children in this country has reached public health crisis proportions, annually claiming the lives of at least 2,000 children and seriously injuring upward of 140,000 others, a federal advisory panel declared in a report scheduled to be released today to Congress.The U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, concluding a 2 1/2 -year nationwide study that included public hearings in 10 states, found a level of fatal abuse and neglect far greater than even experts in the field had realized.
NEWS
December 8, 2002
Prevent Child Abuse Maryland and representatives of faith denominations will present an educational conference, "The Faith Community's Response To Child Abuse and Neglect," from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, 10431 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia. Speakers will discuss the nature and complexity of child abuse, and describe community resources and opportunities. A report will be compiled to be shared with faith communities and educators in Maryland. Admission is $30, including lunch, refreshments and a resource binder.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
U.S. cuts funding for crime victims Congress trims funding for crime victims, leaving nonprofits, state and local agencies with the prospect of cutting services. Social Services chief resigns The head of the city's Department of Social Services resigns after repeated criticism of the agency for failing to prevent the deaths of children from abuse and neglect. Illegal-immigrant measure defeated Taneytown's council defeats an anti-sanctuary resolution, but members make clear they support full enforcement of existing immigration laws.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | May 1, 1994
New York. -- Shayna Bryant's four siblings say that when her parents wanted to punish her they gave her a choice of a beating or going without food for two days.After she was found dead on her fourth birthday on a Formica table in her family's Bronx apartment, an autopsy revealed that she had died of blunt impact wounds to her head and torso, which also showed signs of healed wounds. Her face and hands were scarred by cigarette burns. The four surviving children say the father often used his fists, the mother a shoe.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 20, 2014
Who speaks for Ghanson Debrosse? Before he was born, many people did. Anti-abortion groups did. Churches did. Protesters did. And lawmakers did. Florida, for instance, requires that a woman undergo an ultrasound before getting an abortion, and the provider must offer her the option of viewing the image. Ghanson was not aborted. He was born, Oct. 26, 2010, to a teenage mother, Fafane Caze. During his short stay on this Earth, he endured enough pain for a lifetime. Police say that when he wet the floor, his mother burned his genitals with a lighter, and when he soiled his diaper, she beat him with a broom handle.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sister Dolores Baumgartner, a retired parochial school and orphanage principal during her 74 years as a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a heart attack Thursday at her order's Maria Health Care Center in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 93. Born Dolores Julia Baumgartner in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Bernard Baumgartner and the former Frances Reischmann. She attended St. Boniface School in North Philadelphia and decided to join the religious order in 1936.
NEWS
By Adam Rosenberg | March 11, 2013
Every week, dozens of parents, guardians and leaders at youth-serving organizations tell me that they want to do whatever they can do to keep their children safe from abuse. One such tool is the state's sex offender registry. Accessible by the Internet, sex offender registries provide a simple map and list of people who have committed sexual crimes against children, or sexually violent crimes against adults. There are even apps for viewing the registry on mobile devices. One need only to do a routine check every so often in order to be reminded that the threat of child sex abuse impacts every neighborhood and that every community has its share of offenders.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Ten volunteers have become sworn Court Appointed Special Advocates this month for Maryland's abused and neglected children. The volunteers have completed 30 hours of classroom training coupled with at least two hours of court observation to qualify to work on behalf of the state's foster children to ensure their rights are protected as the state seeks to find them permanent homes. The new CASA volunteers are Doris Barnes, of Monkton; Peggy Nicholson and Lela M. Yorbor, both of Woodlawn; Natalie Snell, of Randallstown; Corryne Deliberto, of Rodgers Forge; Lyn Biller, Stacey Gallina and Jennifer Keeney, of Westminster; Anne Chiolo of Finksburg; and Russell Bailey of Gettysburg, Pa. Nicholson, a former analyst with the Social Security Administration, said she felt as though it was "my obligation to give back to the community that has been so good to me. " To Chiolo, a mother of two boys, the opportunity is rewarding.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
Young victims and perpetrators of violent crime in Baltimore are more likely to skip school, be abused or neglected or have a history of contact with the juvenile criminal system, a city Health Department report found. The study, released Friday and based on data from 2002 to 2007, sheds light on the intractable problem of youth violence in Baltimore and is part of the agency's effort to devise ways to intervene before young people get into trouble. The statistics show that children who were crime victims had roughly the same struggles with truancy and rates of abuse as youths who committed violence, making the two groups practically indistinguishable, said Jacquelyn Duval-Harvey, a Health Department deputy commissioner.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | April 29, 2008
Reform of child welfare systems in Maryland and several other states is hampered by "misguided and secretive policies" that restrict disclosure of information about deaths and serious injuries resulting from abuse or neglect, according to a report to be released today by two national child advocacy groups. Maryland was among 10 states that received an "F" grade because they "place confidentiality above the welfare" of children. The report by the University of San Diego School of Law's Children's Advocacy Institute and Washington- based First Star argues for greater transparency so child welfare systems can be held accountable and future tragedies can be averted.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2004
These events are scheduled at the Baltimore Convention Center, Howard and Pratt streets. April 19-20 BizLearn 2004 meeting. Estimated attendance: 800. April 20 Annual Conference on Family. Estimated attendance: 700. April 22-25 Respiratory Care Medical Convention. Estimated attendance: 2,000+. April 23-25 Charismatic Catholic Conference. Estimated attendance: 500. April 23-25 International Gem & Jewelry Show. Estimated attendance: 5,000+. Contact: 301-294-1640 April 24-25 International Association of Culinary Professionals trade show.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1996
Parents who have a mental illness are at a higher risk of abusing or neglecting their children, a Johns Hopkins University study has found.In a study of nearly 10,000 parents, 58.5 percent of those who abused their children suffered from a mental illness, as did 69.3 percent of parents who neglected their children, Dr. Yuriko Egami reported in a recent issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry."
NEWS
January 20, 2008
U.S. cuts funding for crime victims Congress trims funding for crime victims, leaving nonprofits, state and local agencies with the prospect of cutting services. Social Services chief resigns The head of the city's Department of Social Services resigns after repeated criticism of the agency for failing to prevent the deaths of children from abuse and neglect. Illegal-immigrant measure defeated Taneytown's council defeats an anti-sanctuary resolution, but members make clear they support full enforcement of existing immigration laws.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter and Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporters | January 11, 2008
Disturbed that child protective services failed to prevent the death of a 2-year-old city girl despite previous investigations of her mother for child abuse and neglect, Baltimore lawmakers said yesterday that immediate legislation is needed to better track such cases. The calls to monitor abusive women for new pregnancies came amid an investigation by Maryland's Department of Human Resources into the agency's handling of Bryanna Harris, who police say died in June after ingesting methadone and being dealt a blow to her abdomen.
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