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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
Retired men have a passion for watching the labor of men who have not yet put work behind them. And the misty riverbanks of Fort McHenry are a magnet for retired men.Every morning, a bunch of old-timers shows up to walk the grounds (many on doctor's orders, although they've yet to see a doctor out for a walk); to talk about stuff that people don't seem to care about anymore; and to keep a close eye on life inside Baltimore's star fort.Favorite topics include visiting geese from Canada, middle-of-the-workday lovers tumbling beneath trees along the sea wall, and which version of the American flag may be flying on any given day. Their current obsession: the snail's pace of construction of a 60,000-square-foot maintenance shed a stone's throw from the statue of Orpheus.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Other people's typographical errors are always more amusing than one's own.  The mechanism is simple. An instant's distraction, the wrong neuron fires, and the mind, knowing what it intended  to write, slides over the error without recognizing it.  One makes them. Everyone makes them. This is why (How often must I tell you this before it sinks in?) I ought to have a copy editor. You ought to have a copy editor. Everyone ought to have a copy editor.  The endless fertility of typographical errors makes possible a book, Just My Typo (Three Rivers Press, 181 pages, $11.99)
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NEWS
August 27, 2004
MEDAL MANIA As the Summer Olympics enter the final weekend, keep track of who's taking home the medals. For real-time updates and archived coverage, go to www.baltimoresun.com/olympics. REALITY TELEVISION See a video of television critic David Zurawik discussing the fall TV season's abundance of reality shows. www.baltimoresun.com/zurawik
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
When general manager Ozzie Newsome spoke to the media at last month's “State of the Ravens” news conference, he did everything but guarantee that the organization would add the type of pass catcher that it needs before the start of the 2014 season. “I think we've identified the type of player that we're looking for,” Newsome said. “That player will be available ... whether it's in free agency, whether he's a cap casualty, whether it's in the draft or whether it's through trade.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | September 23, 1998
1997 Sutter Home Merlot Rose ($6).Wine snobs might scoff at the very idea of recommending a pink merlot from a mass-market producer, but Sutter Home's new product is a classy wine that delivers excellent value. First of all, it's dry - not at all a carbon copy of Sutter Home's popular white zinfandel. That doesn't mean bone-dry or severe, but it's clearly made to go with food. Its pure cherry-strawberry flavors and crisp acidity should match up well with salmon or ham. Sutter Home has found an excellent way to use California's growing abundance of marginal merlot that would never make a decent (( red wine.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
On Wednesday, October 1, 2003, ANDREW M. ERCOLE. Andy died peacefully with dignity and grace, at his home, surrounded by his family, friends and "Bailey". He is the loved husband of Phyllis; father of Sharon, David, Patty, and Michael and Jeff; he is also survived by ten grandchildren, one great-grandchild and an abundance of loving relatives and friends. If desired, Memorial contributions can be made to Hospice of Baltimore or the Humane Society.it is both with a cheer and a smile, that his family will hold a private celebration of his life on Saturday.
FEATURES
By SARAH KICKLER KELBER | March 3, 2007
When the Top 24 were finally revealed on American Idol a couple of weeks ago, there seemed to be an abundance of contestants making the cut whom we'd never seen before. Now I know why: They're boring! We got stuck with Alaina Alexander (now mercifully gone), Haley Scarnato (still around) and Leslie Hunt (also cut this week). It seems as if we saw some more dynamic performers during auditions, so when they threw these people we'd never seen before into the semifinals, the assumption was that they were amazingly good.
TRAVEL
December 16, 2007
It seems so ironic that the very fields of Antietam, which are today possessed by butterflies and flowers in abundance, should have been the same fields upon which so many died during our Civil War. Perhaps these beauties of creation are trying to tell us something. Dennis L. Durham Bel Air The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 25, 2002
One of the year's biggest food trends is the emphasis on and importance of fine ingredients. From a local shop devoted to artisanal cheeses to the ever-blossoming number of farmers' markets around the state, high-quality, fresh ingredients are now readily available to both the casual home cook and the local chef. Keeping that in mind, we have selected 12 of our favorite recipes from this past year that make use of this abundance of local resources and at the same time illustrate the great variety available to our readers from the contributions of our regular columnists, local celebrity chefs and home cooks themselves throughout the year.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | July 9, 1997
Item: Uncle Ben's Pinto Beans and RiceWhat You Get: 7.5 ounces, or about 3 servingsCost: $1.79Time to Prepare: about 25 minutes, microwave or stovetopReview: Pleasantly surprised at the abundance of beans in this dish, I was also relieved that it wasn't too spicy for kids. (Mine downed it as a side with a hastily prepared taco dinner. Grown-ups might prefer it with a touch of chopped fresh cilantro.) "Perfect for meatless meals," reads the box, but with less than 10 percent of a day's requirement of protein, I'd serve it with grilled meat or top with cheese.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
- On a chilly morning when other watermen on the Patuxent River dredged for oysters, Jimmy Trossbach sought more slippery quarry - American eels. "I don't know what we'll find here," Trossbach said as he guided his 45-foot workboat, Prospector, to a pair of empty plastic jugs bobbing on the water. His helper, Jake Walker, hooked the makeshift buoy and reeled in the eel pots or traps they'd set in the river two days before. The first cylindrical mesh cage they hauled aboard pulsed with a writhing tangle of olive green.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Clear, sunny skies and cool, dry air are forecast in the Baltimore area Tuesday with highs around 70 degrees. Overnight lows were forecast in the lower- to mid-50s. Slight 5-10 mph breezes from the northeast is expected throughout the day, shifting to easterly in the evening. The air is dry, with dew points in the 30s and 40s. Wednesday and Thursday, more sunshine is expected, with mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies. Temperatures are expected to warm slightly, with highs in the upper 70s and lower 80s. Friday could bring a slight chance of precipitation but otherwise partly cloudy skies and highs in the lower 80s. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
With colorful dishware gleaming and bins stuffed to overflowing with every possible kitchen gadget, Sur La Table opened in Towson Town Center Friday. Music sung by French vocalists played and espresso was flowing as visitors surveyed the new 4,800-square-foot store managed by Anthony Harris. The store, which will employ more than 20 full- and part-time workers, is still hiring, Harris said. Sur La Table began in 1972 in Seattle's Pike Place Market with a philosophy that the kitchen is the center of the home.
NEWS
April 22, 2012
Steamed crabs, cream of crab soup, crab cakes, crab imperial, soft shell crab, deviled crab, corn and crab chowder, crab bisque, crab dip, crab salad, crab fritters, crab ravioli, crab pie, crab quiche - but that's probably enough for the first day. Pardon us while we drool at the news that the Chesapeake Bay crab population has rebounded. The annual winter dredge survey has projected an estimated 764 million blue crabs bay-wide, the highest crab population estimate since 1993 and a stunning two-thirds more than last year's total.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A later start to the walleye season has resulted in the largest member of the perch family being "the most abundant fish species" in Deep Creek Lake, according to Al Klotz, Western Regional Fisheries Manager for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The season, which began Wednesday, starts with a daily creel limit of five and 15-inch minimum size limit. Klotz said several walleyes more than 20 inches long have already been spotted or caught. Aside from Deep Creek Lake, walleye are plentiful in the Youghiogheny River Reservoir, Jennings Randolph Lake, Savage River Reservoir, Potomac River and Liberty Reservoir.
NEWS
By Leah Speer | December 1, 2011
Everyone has hopes and dreams for their families. I thought I'd planned everything out perfectly. Up until recently, I thought I'd played by the rules. So how did this middle-class, college-educated, gracious woman go from a comfortable life in a cozy two-story house to a stressful, paycheck-to-paycheck life in an apartment? It didn't seem fair. I know - life isn't always fair. But I fancied that statement more when it didn't apply to my life. Don't get me wrong, I understand the mechanics of it. My husband and I went from two incomes to one when we went from one child to two in less than two years.
NEWS
By WILLIAM GOLDSBOROUGH | August 13, 1995
Your editorial, ''Angst Among the Hardshells'' (July 30), declares that ''crabs are back and bountiful . . . in ample evidence, on trotlines and in crab pots.'' Even with a stretch of the imagination, this characterization would only apply to a few small areas of the Chesapeake Bay.Possibly the most telling indication of this situation is the daily migration of trotliners, crossing the bay from the Eastern Shore to Western Shore rivers in search of crabs; that's unprecedented.The most disturbing aspect of the editorial is the ease with which it dismisses much of the available data and the work of many bay scientists who understand the crab.
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | September 23, 1990
Rockfish enthusiasts got some good news and bad news Thursday when the Department of Natural Resources released the 1990 Striped Bass Young-of-Year Index.The report indicates how well this year's striped bass survived the spawning process. Biologists say the index is an indicator of relative abundance and is the best tool we have to determine the strength of the year-class. The biologists also say that by the time the year-class develops into the juvenile stage -- where they look like fish -- the year-class is established.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
High winds and bitter temperatures kept deer hunters at home and dropped the total number of kills for the 2010-11 season below the 100,000 mark for the first time in three years. During the archery, muzzleloader and modern firearms seasons, hunters killed 98,663 deer, down 2 percent from last year's record season. Brian Eyler, deer project leader for the Department of Natural Resources, called the season "challenging. " In addition to the weather, an abundant acorn crop meant deer did not have to leave safety to search for food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Samos doesn't take reservations, doesn't take credit cards and doesn't have a liquor license. Yet it does have plenty of customers. What pulls people into this small, family-run operation is the food. The kitchen, supervised by chef and owner Nicholas Georgalas, dishes up zesty Greek fare in portions that would feed an All-American football player. The dozen or so tables split between two dining rooms, one offering a view of the open kitchen, are usually full — occupied by priests, workmen, staff members from nearby Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and extended families.
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