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NEWS
By Paul Watson and Al Jacinto and Paul Watson and Al Jacinto,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
ZAMBOANGA, Philippines -- A militant leader linked to al-Qaida and wanted in the beheading of a tourist from California has been killed in a jungle battle, the Philippine army announced yesterday. The military first reported that it had wounded Jainal Antel Sali Jr., also known as Abu Solaiman, on Tuesday when special forces raided an Abu Sayyaf militant group hide-out on Jolo Island, about 600 miles south of Manila. But Sali, also wanted in the kidnapping of two American missionaries, was later confirmed dead at a news conference in Manila at which the chief of the armed forces, Gen. Hermogenes Esperon, showed photographs of the corpse.
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NEWS
By Paul Watson and Al Jacinto and Paul Watson and Al Jacinto,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
ZAMBOANGA, Philippines -- A militant leader linked to al-Qaida and wanted in the beheading of a tourist from California has been killed in a jungle battle, the Philippine army announced yesterday. The military first reported that it had wounded Jainal Antel Sali Jr., also known as Abu Solaiman, on Tuesday when special forces raided an Abu Sayyaf militant group hide-out on Jolo Island, about 600 miles south of Manila. But Sali, also wanted in the kidnapping of two American missionaries, was later confirmed dead at a news conference in Manila at which the chief of the armed forces, Gen. Hermogenes Esperon, showed photographs of the corpse.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States will send nearly 2,000 troops to the Philippines in the next few weeks to fight Muslim extremists in the southern part of the country, opening a new front in the fight against terrorism, Pentagon officials said yesterday. A six-month training mission last year in the Philippines limited 1,300 U.S. troops - including 160 Special Forces soldiers - to an advisory role and permitted them to fire only in self-defense in the rare cases when they accompanied Philippine soldiers.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - The Bush administration is all set to bring its "war on terrorism" to the Philippines. Hundreds of Green Berets, Navy SEALS and Marines are preparing to land on Jolo island and hunt down the Abu Sayyaf, a ruthless gang of kidnappers who style themselves Islamic militants. There's just one snag. The Philippine government, after apparently agreeing to let U.S. troops engage in combat, is balking now that the deal has become public. Yesterday, Philippine Defense Secretary Angelo Reyes flew to the United States, where he is to meet this week in Washington with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and other officials.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - The Bush administration is all set to bring its "war on terrorism" to the Philippines. Hundreds of Green Berets, Navy SEALS and Marines are preparing to land on Jolo island and hunt down the Abu Sayyaf, a ruthless gang of kidnappers who style themselves Islamic militants. There's just one snag. The Philippine government, after apparently agreeing to let U.S. troops engage in combat, is balking now that the deal has become public. Yesterday, Philippine Defense Secretary Angelo Reyes flew to the United States, where he is to meet this week in Washington with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and other officials.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - Amid growing criticism that the Philippine government would be acting illegally if it let U.S. troops engage in combat here, a top Muslim leader warned yesterday that the planned deployment could trigger an anti-American backlash. "I am afraid this might be fraught with danger," said Parouk Hussin, governor of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. "People are very poor, but everyone owns a gun." Pentagon officials said last week that the United States will send 3,000 troops to the Philippines to help hunt down members of the Abu Sayyaf, a ruthless gang of kidnappers who call themselves Islamic militants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 2002
WASHINGTON - The United States and the Philippines may soon start a new military training operation against Muslim extremists in the southern Philippines that would involve 300 to 400 American troops, including many on jungle combat patrols in a risky hunt for a resurgent guerrilla force, military officials say. The proposed exercise, which could begin as soon as next month, reflects the Pentagon's growing concern that militant Islamic networks pose...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 2002
MANILA, Philippines - Philippine armed forces, with U.S. assistance, have determined the general location of two American hostages being held by Islamic militants on the southern island of Basilan and are ready to launch operations to free them, the country's chief military spokesman says. Brig. Gen. Edilberto Adan said he expects American missionary couple Martin and Gracia Burnham to be seen soon, now that U.S. military personnel and high-technology surveillance and communications equipment have arrived on the island.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2002
DAVAO CITY, Philippines - An American missionary held hostage for more that a year was killed yesterday when U.S.-trained Philippine troops moved in to try to rescue him and his wife from their militant Islamic captors. The missionary, Martin Burnham, 42, of Rose Hill, Kan., died in a shootout between the troops and the militants, who belong to the group Abu Sayyaf. A Filipina nurse was also killed. Burnham's wife, Gracia, 43, also a missionary, was reported wounded in the right thigh, but was said to be out of danger after surgery in a military hospital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - In an action meant to show U.S. resolve, the Justice Department announced yesterday the indictment of five suspected members of a terrorist group in connection with the death of a kidnapped missionary in the Philippines. The indictments identified the five as Khadafi Abubakar Janjalani, described as the spiritual leader of the Abu Sayyaf guerrilla group; Isnilon Totoni Hapilon, the second in command; Aldam Tilao, a spokesman for the group; Jainal Antel Sali Jr., an intelligence officer; and Hamsiraji Marusi Sali, a group leader.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 23, 2003
MANILA, Philippines - Amid growing criticism that the Philippine government would be acting illegally if it let U.S. troops engage in combat here, a top Muslim leader warned yesterday that the planned deployment could trigger an anti-American backlash. "I am afraid this might be fraught with danger," said Parouk Hussin, governor of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. "People are very poor, but everyone owns a gun." Pentagon officials said last week that the United States will send 3,000 troops to the Philippines to help hunt down members of the Abu Sayyaf, a ruthless gang of kidnappers who call themselves Islamic militants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2003
WASHINGTON - The United States will send nearly 2,000 troops to the Philippines in the next few weeks to fight Muslim extremists in the southern part of the country, opening a new front in the fight against terrorism, Pentagon officials said yesterday. A six-month training mission last year in the Philippines limited 1,300 U.S. troops - including 160 Special Forces soldiers - to an advisory role and permitted them to fire only in self-defense in the rare cases when they accompanied Philippine soldiers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 2002
WASHINGTON - The United States and the Philippines may soon start a new military training operation against Muslim extremists in the southern Philippines that would involve 300 to 400 American troops, including many on jungle combat patrols in a risky hunt for a resurgent guerrilla force, military officials say. The proposed exercise, which could begin as soon as next month, reflects the Pentagon's growing concern that militant Islamic networks pose...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - In an action meant to show U.S. resolve, the Justice Department announced yesterday the indictment of five suspected members of a terrorist group in connection with the death of a kidnapped missionary in the Philippines. The indictments identified the five as Khadafi Abubakar Janjalani, described as the spiritual leader of the Abu Sayyaf guerrilla group; Isnilon Totoni Hapilon, the second in command; Aldam Tilao, a spokesman for the group; Jainal Antel Sali Jr., an intelligence officer; and Hamsiraji Marusi Sali, a group leader.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2002
DAVAO CITY, Philippines - An American missionary held hostage for more that a year was killed yesterday when U.S.-trained Philippine troops moved in to try to rescue him and his wife from their militant Islamic captors. The missionary, Martin Burnham, 42, of Rose Hill, Kan., died in a shootout between the troops and the militants, who belong to the group Abu Sayyaf. A Filipina nurse was also killed. Burnham's wife, Gracia, 43, also a missionary, was reported wounded in the right thigh, but was said to be out of danger after surgery in a military hospital.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 2002
MANILA, Philippines - Philippine armed forces, with U.S. assistance, have determined the general location of two American hostages being held by Islamic militants on the southern island of Basilan and are ready to launch operations to free them, the country's chief military spokesman says. Brig. Gen. Edilberto Adan said he expects American missionary couple Martin and Gracia Burnham to be seen soon, now that U.S. military personnel and high-technology surveillance and communications equipment have arrived on the island.
NEWS
July 9, 2001
Ethnic Albanians object to proposal for Macedonia peace SKOPJE, Macedonia -- Ethnic Albanian politicians expressed serious objections yesterday to a new Western-backed peace plan for Macedonia. Their comments came on the eve of talks to help end an ethnic Albanian insurgency that has threatened to develop into civil war. The ethnic Albanian leaders did not reject the draft outright, which is meant to reconcile Macedonia's majority Slavs and minority ethnic Albanians. The parties meet today to negotiate.
NEWS
By Julie Chao and By Julie Chao,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2001
COTABATO, PHILIPPINES - If Osama bin Laden knocked on her front door, Hadja Rhugaya Daud would not turn him away. She would invite him in and offer him a cup of coffee. "As a Muslim, I cannot say, `OK, go!'" says Daud, principal of a government-run Islamic school. "I would say, `Here's your coffee. Here's your room.'" Like many in this impoverished southern Philippine city of Muslims and Christians, Daud has no problems with her Christian neighbors. Yet she also sympathizes with Muslims around the world.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - A U.S. Army special operations helicopter carrying 10 Americans on a routine supply operation crashed into the waters off the Philippines yesterday, officials said. U.S. and Philippine military forces found no survivors in the early hours after the crash. But early this morning, radio and television stations in the Philippines said that fishermen had rescued three crew members. The U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii could not confirm that. U.S. military officials are bracing for what could be one of the single largest U.S. death tolls since the war on terrorism began with a bombardment in Afghanistan on Oct. 7. Navy Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
THE AWAITED first expansion of the U.S. war against terrorism turns out to be limited training assistance to a longstanding U.S. ally, the Philippines. Dispatch of several hundred Special Operations troops is both fully justified and full of risk. Their mission is to help the Philippines destroy a vicious small group called Abu Sayyaf, which has links to al-Qaida, and commits kidnappings, beheadings and other atrocities. Abu Sayyaf flourishes on Basilan and other small islands between the large island of Mindanao and Malaysia's portion of the great island of Borneo.
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