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Abu Nidal

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Abu Nidal, one of the world's most infamous terrorists, moved to Baghdad late last year and obtained the protection of Iraq's president, Saddam Hussein, according to intelligence reports received by U.S. and Middle Eastern government officials. The reports have raised questions about whether Iraq is pushing to establish a terrorism network, American and Middle Eastern officials say.Abu Nidal, a brutal survivor of the Middle East's terrorist wars dating to the 1970s, had been living in Cairo, Egypt, for more than a year, according to Middle Eastern government officials who say they have information from inside his organization.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
In an interview Tuesday with the Arab-language television network Al-Jazeera, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld laid out again the case for war against Saddam Hussein's Iraq. Among other crimes, he said, Iraq "used chemical weapons on its neighbor Iran." The defense secretary has reason to remember that crime. It was taking place in December 1983, when Rumsfeld met with Hussein as a special envoy of President Ronald Reagan. But his mission then was to improve U.S.-Iraqi relations, assure Hussein that Iran was their common enemy and promote an oil pipeline project.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 30, 1998
CAIRO, Egypt -- Long before Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden grabbed the world's attention as an internationally known terrorist, there was Sabri al-Banna.His nom de guerre was Abu Nidal, Arabic for "father of the struggle."As lethal to his friends as his enemies, he waged a war of terror that spanned two decades and three continents. Palestinian by birth, he was a renegade even among terrorists, a follower of Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat and then his most lethal adversary.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
Henry Peter Tewksbury, 79, an innovative former Hollywood director known in recent years as "Henry the Cheeseman" after taking on a new career, died Thursday in Brattleboro, Vt. As a director, Mr. Tewksbury guided the series Father Knows Best and created My Three Sons. But for the past eight years, he had managed the cheese department at the Brattleboro Food Co-op. His book, The Cheeses of Vermont: A Gourmet Guide to Vermont's Artisanal Cheesemakers, was published last year. "His honesty was untouchable.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2002
JERUSALEM - A Palestinian newspaper reported yesterday that Abu Nidal, a Palestinian radical whose small terrorist organization was blamed for killing or wounding nearly 1,000 people in 20 countries, had been found dead in his home in Baghdad, Iraq. He had several bullet wounds and was believed to have killed himself, the paper said. Neither Israeli nor American intelligence sources were able to confirm the report in the newspaper, Al Ayyam, but they said that if the account of his death was true, it was probably not a suicide.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Abu Nidal, the Palestinian extremist whose reign over a terrorist network in the 1980s made him one of the world's most dangerous men, has been apprehended in Egypt and is being detained there, according to U.S. officials.Abu Nidal apparently was caught after he crossed the border from Libya, where he has been headquartered for several years. The Egyptian government has informed Washington of his detention but U.S. officials know few details, the sources said.Recent reports in the Arab press have suggested that Abu Nidal is ailing and might require advanced medical care unavailable in Libya.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 16, 1991
The assassination of three Palestinian guerrilla leaders, including Yasser Arafat's second-in-command, was the work of notorious terrorist Abu Nidal, both Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization now agree.Abu Nidal's involvement in the killings seemed to lift the possibility that the assassinations would disrupt the delicate U.S.-Arab alliance poised for war against Iraq. But it raised intriguing questions about the Byzantine nature of alliances in the Arab world.Both Abu Nidal, perhaps the world's most infamous terrorist, and Arafat's PLO have aligned themselves with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
August 23, 2002
IN THE END, all it took to kill international terrorist Abu Nidal was a bullet in the mouth. And he apparently died by his own hand. Even in death, he confounds. Notorious for a series of spectacular and stunning hijackings and attacks he masterminded in the 1970s and 1980s, feared for his ruthless allegiance to the cause of a free Palestine, Abu Nidal eluded capture throughout his infamous career. Born Sabri al-Banna in British-mandate Palestine, he chose the nom de guerre "father of the struggle" as a member of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | February 7, 1991
PARIS -- Amid growing fears of terrorist strikes in support of Saddam Hussein, Italian authorities have released two terrorists convicted of aiding hijackers of the Achille Lauro ocean liner in 1985, according to statements by their Italian lawyers yesterday.Mohamed Issa Abbas and Yussef Ahmed Sa'ad, reputed members of the Fatah Revolutionary Council, were released in late December, said Gianfranco Pagano, one of the lawyers who applied for the release of the two men under an Italian amnesty law.Abbas and Sa'ad were expelled from Italy after their early release and are believed to be in Algeria.
NEWS
August 30, 1998
WHISKING Mohamed Rashed Daoud Al-'Owhali and Mohammed Saddiq Odeh to the United States to stand trial for the Nairobi bombing does more to deter terrorism than the 79 cruise missiles fired at targets in Sudan and Afghanistan.Terrorism and the fight against it are called low-intensity operations in military jargon. Terrorism is about perception. It is, at bottom, public relations stunts.The disputed report that Egypt arrested terrorist Abu Nidal helps shed understanding on U.S. proclamations against Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
August 23, 2002
IN THE END, all it took to kill international terrorist Abu Nidal was a bullet in the mouth. And he apparently died by his own hand. Even in death, he confounds. Notorious for a series of spectacular and stunning hijackings and attacks he masterminded in the 1970s and 1980s, feared for his ruthless allegiance to the cause of a free Palestine, Abu Nidal eluded capture throughout his infamous career. Born Sabri al-Banna in British-mandate Palestine, he chose the nom de guerre "father of the struggle" as a member of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2002
JERUSALEM - A Palestinian newspaper reported yesterday that Abu Nidal, a Palestinian radical whose small terrorist organization was blamed for killing or wounding nearly 1,000 people in 20 countries, had been found dead in his home in Baghdad, Iraq. He had several bullet wounds and was believed to have killed himself, the paper said. Neither Israeli nor American intelligence sources were able to confirm the report in the newspaper, Al Ayyam, but they said that if the account of his death was true, it was probably not a suicide.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Abu Nidal, one of the world's most infamous terrorists, moved to Baghdad late last year and obtained the protection of Iraq's president, Saddam Hussein, according to intelligence reports received by U.S. and Middle Eastern government officials. The reports have raised questions about whether Iraq is pushing to establish a terrorism network, American and Middle Eastern officials say.Abu Nidal, a brutal survivor of the Middle East's terrorist wars dating to the 1970s, had been living in Cairo, Egypt, for more than a year, according to Middle Eastern government officials who say they have information from inside his organization.
NEWS
August 30, 1998
WHISKING Mohamed Rashed Daoud Al-'Owhali and Mohammed Saddiq Odeh to the United States to stand trial for the Nairobi bombing does more to deter terrorism than the 79 cruise missiles fired at targets in Sudan and Afghanistan.Terrorism and the fight against it are called low-intensity operations in military jargon. Terrorism is about perception. It is, at bottom, public relations stunts.The disputed report that Egypt arrested terrorist Abu Nidal helps shed understanding on U.S. proclamations against Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | August 30, 1998
Hardly a day goes by that Robert E. Ghormley does not think of his son, Mark. The boy and his trumpet back in those days at home, Chestertown. That Christmas flight 25 years ago. The "Welcome Home" sign his son never saw.Now, Ghormley thinks about an evil stranger thousands of miles away inextricably linked to his son: the Palestinian terrorist Abu Nidal, now in the twilight of his life, reportedly in Egypt.One of the first acts of terrorism allegedly masterminded by Abu Nidal was the bombing attack against a Pan Am airliner at Rome airport on Dec. 17, 1973, in which 32 people burned to death.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 30, 1998
CAIRO, Egypt -- Long before Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden grabbed the world's attention as an internationally known terrorist, there was Sabri al-Banna.His nom de guerre was Abu Nidal, Arabic for "father of the struggle."As lethal to his friends as his enemies, he waged a war of terror that spanned two decades and three continents. Palestinian by birth, he was a renegade even among terrorists, a follower of Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat and then his most lethal adversary.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The Palestinian cause is in deep despair because of Saddam Hussein, the dictator of Iraq. For years, his adventures siphoned funds from the Gulf oil states away from Palestinians and the PLO and into his own war machine. His destruction of Kuwait wiped out a major source of subsidies for Palestinian hospitals and schools.Yet his intimidation, belligerence toward the West and animosity toward Israel have won a following among many Palestinians frustrated by Israeli occupation of their lands.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 8, 1991
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli government made clear yesterday that it has no intention of withdrawing from its security zone in southern Lebanon, even as the Lebanese army consolidates its control over Palestinians in the area.The Lebanese government is reported to have asked U.S. representatives for help in prompting the Israelis to leave as part of an effort to take control of the whole country.In Jerusalem, officials said the Israeli presence was not necessarily permanent but set terms suggesting that their army is unlikely to leave Lebanon for a long time.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Abu Nidal, the Palestinian extremist whose reign over a terrorist network in the 1980s made him one of the world's most dangerous men, has been apprehended in Egypt and is being detained there, according to U.S. officials.Abu Nidal apparently was caught after he crossed the border from Libya, where he has been headquartered for several years. The Egyptian government has informed Washington of his detention but U.S. officials know few details, the sources said.Recent reports in the Arab press have suggested that Abu Nidal is ailing and might require advanced medical care unavailable in Libya.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
In Frederich Forsyth's vintage novel, "The Day of the Jackal," a fictional assassin hired by a shadowy terrorist group to kill French President Charles de Gaulle manages to stay one step ahead of the authorities until the very last pages of the book. So it was with the elusive Illich Ramirez Sanchez, dubbed "Carlos the Jackal" by half a dozen security agencies around the world and for more than 20 years one of the world's most wanted criminals.On Sunday, the law finally caught up with Sanchez in the North African nation of Sudan, whose agents seized him in a rented house there and handed him over to Interpol, the international police agency, for extradition to France.
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