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By ASSOCAITED PRESS | September 13, 2007
NEW YORK -- Knicks guard Stephon Marbury testified yesterday in the case of a fired team executive who has accused coach Isiah Thomas of sexual harassment, calling the lawsuit absurd while downplaying an encounter with a drunken intern. After hearing about the lawsuit brought by Anucha Browne Sanders, "I laughed," Marbury said in U.S. District Court. "It was more of a joke than anything." Browne Sanders says she is owed her vice president position back and at least $10 million for enduring a sexually harassing workplace for five years.
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NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
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NEWS
May 15, 1997
BIG INVESTMENT FIRMS are making a mockery of the state's property tax sales, which until recently were orderly auctions that helped Maryland jurisdictions clear up delinquent real estate bills.Investors violate the spirit, if not the letter, of the bidding process by offering absurd sums of money -- a trillion dollars and even "infinity" for tax-delinquent properties. Successful bidders win the right to pay the taxes and then to seek reimbursement from the property owners plus legal fees and interest rates ranging from 12 to 24 percent.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2014
Through stunning advances in technology, guns are becoming more accurate and deadlier. They are also becoming safer. Crazy as it might seem, gun-rights activists are excited about the former, but opposed to the latter. The gun-obsessed might admire computerized, laser-based rifle scopes that turn amateurs into master snipers at 1,200 yards, but offer them "smart gun" technology that limits a firearm's use to its rightful owner and they get surly. Apparently, gun lovers think such a safety feature might become mandatory and, as we all know, anything mandatory constitutes a threat to their absolute Second Amendment rights to bear whatever guns they wish, public safety be damned.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 1996
The Bowman Ensemble's double billing of two one-act plays, Eugene Ionesco's 1950 classic "The Bald Soprano" and a brand new play by Bowman artistic director Matthew Ramsay, "Mr. Positive," makes for an evening devoted to the theater of the absurd.It also might seem absurdly bold for a young Baltimore playwright to link himself so directly with Ionesco. The surprise of the night is that while it's easy enough to make some negative observations about "Mr. Positive," Ramsay does deliver plenty of laughs in his surreal comedy of manners.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
A Baltimore County man who has been implicated by the Web site The Smoking Gun as a key informant in baseball's steroid scandal has denied any association with the federal government's investigation into illegal performance-enhancing drugs. In an exclusive interview with The Baltimore Sun yesterday, Andrew Michael "Mike" Bogdan admitted to helping the FBI in a real-estate fraud case as part of a plea agreement. But he said he did not use his close friendship with former Orioles outfielder Larry Bigbie to assist the FBI in nabbing one of baseball's primary steroid distributors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999
Flannery O'Connor 1925-1964After graduating from Georgia State College for Women, Milledgeville, O'Connor studied creative writing at the University of Iowa. Her first novel, "Wise Blood" (1952), explored, in her own words, "religious consciousness without a religion." The work combines the keen ear for common speech, caustic religious imagination and flair for the absurd -- all traits that were to characterize her subsequent novel and collections of short stories. She is regarded as a master of the short story and one collection in particular, "A Good Man is Hard to Find," is a classic.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 16, 2008
A lot of past medical practices strike us as instantly absurd -- all that nasty bloodletting, for a start. But time was when otherwise sensible professionals didn't think twice about applying cures that flew in the face of logic, not to mention common sense or common decency. One of the most egregious of treatments, prescribed for women who didn't seem themselves after childbirth, became the subject of an influential short story in the 1890s -- The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gillman.
NEWS
By R. Richard Banks | January 3, 1991
PARANOIA often blurs the boundary between the rational and the absurd.When a U.S. Department of Education official recently observed that universities cannot sponsor race-exclusive scholarships, the ensuing uproar forced the administration to recant.After the blizzard of criticism, Michael Williams, the Education Department official, declared that his view had been "legally correct" but "politically naive." Not only was his view legally correct; it made sense.In the swirl of America's racial maelstrom, common sense and logical reasoning are early casualties.
NEWS
June 5, 2005
What's absurd is tolerance for acts of torture President Bush's response to Amnesty International's report criticizing U.S. treatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay was to characterize it as "absurd" ("`Gulag' charge absurd, Bush says," June 1). What is absurd is this administration's penchant for flouting the international rule of law, detaining individuals without charges, trial or access to due process. What is patently absurd is the U.S. interrogation and detention policies and practices that condone torture and mistreatment of detainees.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 29, 2014
"But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep. " -- Robert Frost Sen. Richard Russell called it a work of "manifold evils. " Sen. Barry Goldwater called it a "threat to the very essence" of America. Rep. Howard Smith called it a "monstrous instrument of oppression. " It was the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and its "oppression," "threat" and "evil," at least in the eyes of those conservative men, were that it outlawed racial discrimination in public places.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
I really do try to think the best of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake - as, for instance, when I voted for her in the 2012 election. Her periodic walks through Baltimore's streets ( "Mayor strolls to show safe streets," June 5) make that so difficult. The very fact that Ms. Rawlings-Blake's walk is newsworthy is itself important: Why is it news that a mayor chooses to stroll through the streets of Baltimore? Is this not what William Donald Schaefer did every day of his working life?
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
First, there was a lawsuit about concussions. Now, more than 500 retired NFL players have filed a lawsuit claiming teams provided them with illegal drugs , including narcotics and pain killers, that caused medical complications down the road. The suit alleges that the league " has intentionally, recklessly and negligently created and maintained a culture of drug misuse, substituting players' health for profit. " To me, this appears to be a bunch of former players who keep wanting to tap into the seemingly endless amount of money the NFL is making these days.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
What supreme irony that a spokesperson for a group called Women Speak for Themselves has written a letter to the editor supporting a position that allows women's employers to speak for them instead ("Women oppose contraception mandate," March 31). This is just one more example of absurd religious thinking. Kenneth Hoffman, Annapolis - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
As a businessman I read The Sun to be informed and educated, not for snide and misinformed comments such as those in commentator Matt Patterson's piece on the nomination of Thomas Perez as labor secretary ("Why do we need a labor department?" March 22). It was difficult to determine whether the author meant to be taken seriously. To suggest that we don't need an agency to look out for the interests of workers, when their jobs have so often been shipped overseas and their salaries are stagnant at a time of record corporate profits that primarily benefit shareholders, is simply foolish.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
"Love, Sex and the IRS" is a 1970s farce by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore that has more going for it than its intriguing title. Bowie Community Theatre's cast and crew transform what might seem dated into nostalgic sitcom gold, coaxing giggles from the audience at the improbable plot. Ensconced in an apartment building that does not permit unmarried couples to rent units are a pair of male roommates — Jon and Leslie. Unknown to Leslie, they are listed as a married couple on their joint tax returns filed by Jon. Having saved money for four years, Jon learns that an IRS auditor will visit, forcing Leslie to pose as Jon's wife, complete with high heels and tight dresses.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 28, 1991
Just when you think you've seen it all, along come something new and fresh to reaffirm your faith in human mediocrity."Robot Jox," now at the Westview, is just such an inanity, a live-action Saturday Morning Cartoon. It takes the bad acting, ludicrous plotting, and absurd conceits of those crummy little half-hour shows and gives them flesh and spirit and vividness. Now on the big screen, for millions of bucks: the bad, the ludicrous and the absurd.Gary Graham, who looks a little like Mick Jagger, plays a tough old "robot athlete" who sits in the head of a 50-foot metal man and engineers slo-mo mechanized-karate against another such creature with a nasty Russky in the cockpit, as a way of settling international disputes without nuclear war.The movie, sadly directed by the great horror film maker Stuart Gordon, responsible for the artful atrocity called "Re-Animator," is strictly a case of high kitsch and low budget but it lacks the dangerous edge of "Re-Animator."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 24, 2002
When We Can't See the Forest for the Bushes, by Pat Oliphant (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 128 pages, $14.95). Pat Oliphant, a native Australian, has stood firmly among the top three or four cartoonists in the U.S. since he began at the Denver Post in 1964. Now syndicated in more than 300 newspapers, his pen has never been sharper. In this collection of cartoons from October 2000 till a year later, he gives absolutely no quarter to anyone. Perhaps the closest thing to a lovable image in this collection is the enormous bear that represents the economy, which is alternatively tweaked, goaded, wrestled and ridden by a tiny, obdurate and over-spectacled Alan Greenspan.
NEWS
May 25, 2012
The greatest commencement address ever is now more than three decades old. And it's safe to say it will never be surpassed or even equaled. It belongs to the ages. In 1979, its author summed up the condition of modern man by noting that, quote, more than at any other time in history, humanity is at the crossroads: One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness; the other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly. Unquote. Bang. That's all she wrote.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 1, 2012
Among those who offered testimony in opposition to the legalization of same-sex marriage in Maryland was Peter Sprigg, senior fellow with the conservative Family Research Council, resident of Montgomery County and the "Sprigg" in this exchange with Chris Matthews onMSNBC's "Hardball" in 2010: Matthews: Do you think we should outlaw gay behavior? Sprigg: Well, I think certainly - Matthews: I'm just asking you, should we outlaw gay behavior? Sprigg: I think that the Supreme Court decision in Lawrence v. Texas, which overturned the sodomy laws in this country, was wrongly decided.
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