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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Over the past 30 years, lasers have become a familiar and versatile tool, beaming minute particles of light known as photons to perform eye surgery, etch computer circuits and read postal bar codes.Now, after years of effort, a research team will announce today that it has created the first atom laser -- a device that shoots out a tight beam of atoms instead of photons, making possible even more precise operations.Such a laser could conceivably perform near-miracles, such as depositing single atoms onto computer chips, tracing much finer patterns than now possible and greatly increasing the chips' speed and capacity.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Scientists announced yesterday that a chilly cloud of gas the width of a strand of hair created for a tenth of a second in a Colorado lab is a new type of matter - one that could lead to levitated trains, faster computers and cheaper electric bills. The researchers say they produced the world's first fermionic condensate by chilling potassium atoms and applying a magnetic field, a process that forced the atoms to form pairs in the same way that electrons pair off when they produce superconductivity.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 14, 1995
In a discovery that experts are calling "breathtaking" and "beautiful" -- and of "Nobel Prize caliber" -- physicists at the University of Colorado at Boulder have created an entirely new state of matter. It exists only in the coldest spot in the universe, currently a carrot-sized tube in the laboratory of physicists Carl Weiman and Eric Cornell.Albert Einstein predicted more than 70 years ago that atoms chilled to sufficiently frigid temperatures should "freeze" into this new state, just as liquid water freezes into solid ice. More compact even than a solid, the new state of matter contains several thousand atoms all merged into one."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 28, 2004
The low-carbohydrate bandwagon rolled onto York Road some weeks ago, hauling pasta, chips, candy bars, ice cream, pancake and bread mixes. The merchandise costs more than enough, but consider the promise, the new beginning, the new you. Marketeers refer to the low-carb "lifestyle," which seems mostly to be a thing demanding accessorizing. The new La Vida Lo-Carb store stands ready to provide the stuff tossed ashore by this latest dieting tsunami. Mark the low-carbohydrate spaghetti at $3.29 for an 8-ounce box, nearly three times the price of the standard brand.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | July 14, 1995
In a lab in Colorado, inside a jar cooled to the lowest temperature ever reached on Earth or anywhere else, scientists have created a form of matter that has never existed before anywhere in the universe -- something they have dubbed a "superatom."In their creation, Carl Weiman and Eric Cornell of the University of Colorado at Boulder cooled a few thousand atoms of rubidium gas to a temperature so low that they lost their individual identities and acted as if they were a single atom."It's a spectacular discovery," said Daniel Kleppner, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who had been trying for years to create this new form of matter, technically called a Bose-Einstein condensate.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Scientists announced yesterday that a chilly cloud of gas the width of a strand of hair created for a tenth of a second in a Colorado lab is a new type of matter - one that could lead to levitated trains, faster computers and cheaper electric bills. The researchers say they produced the world's first fermionic condensate by chilling potassium atoms and applying a magnetic field, a process that forced the atoms to form pairs in the same way that electrons pair off when they produce superconductivity.
NEWS
By Sherri Kimmel Diegel and Sherri Kimmel Diegel,Special to The Carroll County Sun | November 3, 1991
Many authors appear self-importantly sexy on their book jackets.Not Western Maryland College's Ed Regis.On his latest book, he's stealing a sidelong glance into the beady eyes of a chicken -- a great big, wooly-feathered Carroll County white Cochin chicken.How serious can this book be? Such a dust jacket and such a title: "Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge."Such premises: People are frozen on death to be reactivated in the future. People someday will havetheir brains "downloaded" into a computer, escaping their inefficient and mortal bodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jody Jaffe and By Jody Jaffe,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
I love it when writers up the ante. Last year, Brigitte Aubert two-upped Jeff Deaver's quadriplegic sleuth, Lincoln Rhyme, by making her quadriplegic protagonist blind and mute. Now along comes Chuck Logan, a dazzling thriller writer ripe for best sellerdom, who bests the both of them in Absolute Zero (HarperCollins, 382 pages, $24.95). Hank Sommers is not only paralyzed, but in a coma. And he still solves murders! As if that weren't a colossal enough raise, what catapults the stakes to the moon is that the murder Sommers is solving will be his own. Sommers has help from Phil Broker, the troubled ex-cop hero of Logan's previous two books.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 28, 2004
The low-carbohydrate bandwagon rolled onto York Road some weeks ago, hauling pasta, chips, candy bars, ice cream, pancake and bread mixes. The merchandise costs more than enough, but consider the promise, the new beginning, the new you. Marketeers refer to the low-carb "lifestyle," which seems mostly to be a thing demanding accessorizing. The new La Vida Lo-Carb store stands ready to provide the stuff tossed ashore by this latest dieting tsunami. Mark the low-carbohydrate spaghetti at $3.29 for an 8-ounce box, nearly three times the price of the standard brand.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
In a seemingly odd move, Anne Arundel County deeded about 13 acres last year to a posh South County country club attended by County Executive Janet S. Owens and partly owned by her lifelong friend and adviser, William F. Chaney. County officials and Chaney say that switching the land's ownership simply corrected a bookkeeping error made by the county 10 years ago when the Old South Country Club in Lothian was being built. The error inadvertently gave the county possession of the land, they say. "It's so stupid," said Chaney, who sits on the club's board and owns 1/200th of it. "It's totally nothing, absolutely zero.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jody Jaffe and By Jody Jaffe,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
I love it when writers up the ante. Last year, Brigitte Aubert two-upped Jeff Deaver's quadriplegic sleuth, Lincoln Rhyme, by making her quadriplegic protagonist blind and mute. Now along comes Chuck Logan, a dazzling thriller writer ripe for best sellerdom, who bests the both of them in Absolute Zero (HarperCollins, 382 pages, $24.95). Hank Sommers is not only paralyzed, but in a coma. And he still solves murders! As if that weren't a colossal enough raise, what catapults the stakes to the moon is that the murder Sommers is solving will be his own. Sommers has help from Phil Broker, the troubled ex-cop hero of Logan's previous two books.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
In a seemingly odd move, Anne Arundel County deeded about 13 acres last year to a posh South County country club attended by County Executive Janet S. Owens and partly owned by her lifelong friend and adviser, William F. Chaney. County officials and Chaney say that switching the land's ownership simply corrected a bookkeeping error made by the county 10 years ago when the Old South Country Club in Lothian was being built. The error inadvertently gave the county possession of the land, they say. "It's so stupid," said Chaney, who sits on the club's board and owns 1/200th of it. "It's totally nothing, absolutely zero.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Over the past 30 years, lasers have become a familiar and versatile tool, beaming minute particles of light known as photons to perform eye surgery, etch computer circuits and read postal bar codes.Now, after years of effort, a research team will announce today that it has created the first atom laser -- a device that shoots out a tight beam of atoms instead of photons, making possible even more precise operations.Such a laser could conceivably perform near-miracles, such as depositing single atoms onto computer chips, tracing much finer patterns than now possible and greatly increasing the chips' speed and capacity.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 14, 1995
In a discovery that experts are calling "breathtaking" and "beautiful" -- and of "Nobel Prize caliber" -- physicists at the University of Colorado at Boulder have created an entirely new state of matter. It exists only in the coldest spot in the universe, currently a carrot-sized tube in the laboratory of physicists Carl Weiman and Eric Cornell.Albert Einstein predicted more than 70 years ago that atoms chilled to sufficiently frigid temperatures should "freeze" into this new state, just as liquid water freezes into solid ice. More compact even than a solid, the new state of matter contains several thousand atoms all merged into one."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | July 14, 1995
In a lab in Colorado, inside a jar cooled to the lowest temperature ever reached on Earth or anywhere else, scientists have created a form of matter that has never existed before anywhere in the universe -- something they have dubbed a "superatom."In their creation, Carl Weiman and Eric Cornell of the University of Colorado at Boulder cooled a few thousand atoms of rubidium gas to a temperature so low that they lost their individual identities and acted as if they were a single atom."It's a spectacular discovery," said Daniel Kleppner, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who had been trying for years to create this new form of matter, technically called a Bose-Einstein condensate.
NEWS
By Sherri Kimmel Diegel and Sherri Kimmel Diegel,Special to The Carroll County Sun | November 3, 1991
Many authors appear self-importantly sexy on their book jackets.Not Western Maryland College's Ed Regis.On his latest book, he's stealing a sidelong glance into the beady eyes of a chicken -- a great big, wooly-feathered Carroll County white Cochin chicken.How serious can this book be? Such a dust jacket and such a title: "Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge."Such premises: People are frozen on death to be reactivated in the future. People someday will havetheir brains "downloaded" into a computer, escaping their inefficient and mortal bodies.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 14, 1995
There is, indeed, something new under the sun. By chilling a cloud of atoms down to the coldest temperatures ever achieved, physicists have created a form of matter that never before existed in nature.At a temperature just a small fraction of a degree above absolute zero, the atoms lost their individual identities, condensing to form a coherent, wave-like structure that acts like a single huge atom.This coherence gives the new form of matter "completely different properties" from other materials, said one of its discoverers, Carl Weiman of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
NEWS
June 9, 1993
Stigma of LabelsThe timely and otherwise well written article by Michael Ollove in The Sun May 30 on mental health benefits, stigma and discrimination of people with mental illnesses, had three glaring flaws in it.While the majority of the article accurately described the current and historical denigrating, stigmatizing and ignoring of mental illness as a disease, Mr. Ollove was guilty of just such stigmatizing himself.He first referred to Mr. Crane as "a schizophrenic," then he referred to Ms. Hlatky as "a 49 year-old Dundalk woman diagnosed as manic-depressive," and lastly, referred to Ms. Kadis, "a 39 year-old manic-depressive."
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