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Absolute Power

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NEWS
July 30, 2012
Thanks for your editorial about the lack of wisdom of Governor O'Malley's decision to call a special session of the legislature ("A special mistake," July 26). It has often been stated that "power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely," and this is what the governor appears to have succumbed to. Mr. O'Malley apparently now thinks he is so powerful that he doesn't have to listen to reason and that no matter how far out on a limb he goes, he will always get what he wants.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | September 25, 2012
Presidents get the praise or blame for everything that happens on their watch, but, as Barack Obama has learned, the things the commander-in-chief can actually command are limited in number, thanks to James Madison and Newt Gingrich. Madison and his brilliant colleagues who invented the American system of government disagreed about many things, but they fervently agreed about one big thing: The coercive power of government needed to be held in check. They accomplished this by spreading the power around between the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government.
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NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 5, 1996
Here's your chance to be a star. If you're at least 21 and interested in appearing as an extra in two movies to be filmed in Baltimore this summer, come to an open call from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday at Bohager's, 515 S. Eden St. in Fells Point.Bring a snapshot.Filming for "Absolute Power," starring Clint Eastwood, and "Washington Square," starring Albert Finney and Jennifer Jason Leigh, is to begin in June and July.If you look like a lawyer, a lobbyist, a senator, a secret-service agent or white-collar government worker, you have a shot at "Absolute Power."
NEWS
July 30, 2012
Thanks for your editorial about the lack of wisdom of Governor O'Malley's decision to call a special session of the legislature ("A special mistake," July 26). It has often been stated that "power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely," and this is what the governor appears to have succumbed to. Mr. O'Malley apparently now thinks he is so powerful that he doesn't have to listen to reason and that no matter how far out on a limb he goes, he will always get what he wants.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
Clint Eastwood could make their day.Or, he could leave them on the cutting room floor. But even the chance of appearing in two movies to be shot in Baltimore this summer was enough to attract about 2,500 people to Bohager's restaurant and club last night to enlist as extras."
NEWS
March 28, 1996
OPPONENTS OF A Senate bill that would give the county executive, instead of the governor, authority to appoint school board members in Anne Arundel County are paranoically afraid the measure would upset the balance of power between the executive and school system.The problem with their argument is that, at present, there is no balance of power. The current rules and laws make school boards free agents. Unlike any other department, the board can defy the executive and County Council's directions on how money should be spent.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 1997
TEHRAN, Iran -- When Iranians took to the streets last month in a frenzied wave of joy, Sholeh Sharif watched in awe. Women defied Islamic conventions -- and state security forces -- to celebrate the national soccer team's entry in the World Cup: They danced with men in the street."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 17, 2004
THERE'S A SAYING among members of certain American Indian tribes that to have one's picture taken is like having your soul stolen. The saying obviously pertains to still pictures, but it's not too far a stretch to think that the soul of high school athletics is up for grabs with the increasing presence of television. In the last week, two potential deals involving high school football and basketball telecasts have come to light, hopefully raising warning flags about what comes next. In one deal, the nation's top-ranked football team, South- lake-Carroll of Texas, will play the No. 17 team, Denton-Ryan, on Oct. 14 on either ESPN or ESPN2, according to the Dallas Morning News.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Through March 25, Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia is offering a stunning production of "The King and I," which tells the story of an English widow and the king of Siam finding mutual respect and affection despite their different cultures. The message of tolerance is masterfully told through the poetry of lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II set to the enduring melodies of Richard Rodgers. The 60-year-old musical remains relevant today, and its message must have been groundbreaking when it premiered on Broadway in 1951.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 18, 1997
How far we've come from the days when the president appeared in movies as the great white father, usually a presence so powerful and religious in meaning that, like Christ's, not even his face could be shown. In "Yankee Doodle Dandy," James Cagney's George M. Cohan stood as at Lourdes before the unseen radiance of FDR.Thus, while "Murder at 1600" is a little bit this side of OK as a movie, it is completely fascinating as a cultural artifact. That benevolent, theocratic force known as the commander-in-chief has been deconstructed by our impolite age to a whining, pitiful loser, frozen in the headlight-glare of onrushing catastrophe, indecisive, fretting and sniffling.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Through March 25, Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia is offering a stunning production of "The King and I," which tells the story of an English widow and the king of Siam finding mutual respect and affection despite their different cultures. The message of tolerance is masterfully told through the poetry of lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II set to the enduring melodies of Richard Rodgers. The 60-year-old musical remains relevant today, and its message must have been groundbreaking when it premiered on Broadway in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2005
With the Triple Crown season making the break last Saturday, some 370 local folks had a little help getting into the horseracing frame of mind that night, courtesy of the Jemicy School. About the time the ponies left the gate in the Kentucky Derby, the school, which works with dyslexic students, was kicking off its "Triple Crown Auction" at the Baltimore Convention Center. Wendi Meisel, who co-chaired the party with fellow Jemicy parent Locke Harvey, says the committee went all out with its theme.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 17, 2004
THERE'S A SAYING among members of certain American Indian tribes that to have one's picture taken is like having your soul stolen. The saying obviously pertains to still pictures, but it's not too far a stretch to think that the soul of high school athletics is up for grabs with the increasing presence of television. In the last week, two potential deals involving high school football and basketball telecasts have come to light, hopefully raising warning flags about what comes next. In one deal, the nation's top-ranked football team, South- lake-Carroll of Texas, will play the No. 17 team, Denton-Ryan, on Oct. 14 on either ESPN or ESPN2, according to the Dallas Morning News.
NEWS
June 19, 2002
Democrats' grab for total power rightly rejected Every Marylander who respects fairness and integrity should applaud the Court of Appeals for rejecting the Glendening administration's redistricting plan, which would have splintered communities across Maryland for raw partisan gain ("Court of Appeals rejects state redistricting map," June 12). Not content to control two-thirds of the state legislature, Democratic leaders tried to twist and turn their way to absolute power in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | March 4, 2001
GOOD BILL, bad year." That's how one senator described the defeat last week of a bill that would have given Maryland's distorted state budgeting process some much-needed equilibrium. Budgeting, Maryland-style, remains a one-man show. When he submitted this year's $21 billion state spending plan, Gov. Parris N. Glendening became the most powerful state executive in the nation. That's because no other governor has the muscle given to Maryland's chief executive by our state constitution.
NEWS
February 16, 2001
NORMALLY, no investigation of a presidential pardon makes sense. But the three proceeding against President Clinton's last-minute pardons of Marc Rich and Pincus Green are in order. The presidential pardon is a grave responsibility. Presidents have relied by choice -- not law -- on a pardon office in the Justice Department for advice. Before leaving office, President Clinton granted no more pardons and commutations than his predecessors, but did act without Justice Department advice on quite a few. None was as controversial as President Nixon's clemency for Jimmy Hoffa, President Ford's pardon of President Nixon or President George H. W. Bush's pardon of former Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger.
NEWS
June 19, 2002
Democrats' grab for total power rightly rejected Every Marylander who respects fairness and integrity should applaud the Court of Appeals for rejecting the Glendening administration's redistricting plan, which would have splintered communities across Maryland for raw partisan gain ("Court of Appeals rejects state redistricting map," June 12). Not content to control two-thirds of the state legislature, Democratic leaders tried to twist and turn their way to absolute power in Annapolis.
NEWS
March 21, 1997
Police powers should be scrutinized closelyJudge John Carroll Byrnes and the prosecutors and jurors who are sending Stephen Pagotto to prison have done the right thing.Because of the extraordinary powers the police are given, their actions must be subject to even more scrutiny than those of other citizens. Police officers must realize that they face review, criticism and even criminal prosecution for the way they exercise their power.To affirm that the police are in the right, no matter what they have done, is to give them absolute power -- a very dangerous notion.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 1997
TEHRAN, Iran -- When Iranians took to the streets last month in a frenzied wave of joy, Sholeh Sharif watched in awe. Women defied Islamic conventions -- and state security forces -- to celebrate the national soccer team's entry in the World Cup: They danced with men in the street."
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